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Old Apr 1, 2006, 11:30 PM   #1
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I'd like to purchase a filter for protection of my non-removable Kodak p880 lens. I understand that I have to buy Kodak's lens adapter so that I can use 55mm lenses, but when I took a look at what was out there... #101, 0.3 (2x); #102, 0.6 (4x); Tiffen's 0.9, (ND)... what does this all mean ? And since the filter will make some sort of difference "in apeture readings" from what i've read, will the camera process it appropriately ? what should i get ? i just want to protect my lens.
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Old Apr 2, 2006, 3:15 AM   #2
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J.Sato wrote:
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I'd like to purchase a filter for protection of my non-removable Kodak p880 lens. I understand that I have to buy Kodak's lens adapter so that I can use 55mm lenses, but when I took a look at what was out there... #101, 0.3 (2x); #102, 0.6 (4x); Tiffen's 0.9, (ND)... what does this all mean ? And since the filter will make some sort of difference "in apeture readings" from what i've read, will the camera process it appropriately ? what should i get ? i just want to protect my lens.
If you just want to protect the lens, you don't want an N.D. filter. Get a "skylight" or "U.V." filter instead. N.D. (neutral density) is for cutting down light when shooting in scenes that are too bright or too high in contrast.

Also, I see that the actual filter threads are 52mm, so why buy a 55mm protection filter? When using any other filter or conversion lens, you'll want to remove the filter anyway, so I'd buy the 52mm UV/skylight filter, then buy the 52->55mm step-up ring for use with your 55mm thread lenses.

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Old Apr 2, 2006, 7:11 AM   #3
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Norm in Fujino,

I am not sure where you get your information. The adaptor for the P880 is advertised as a 55mm. I have the 6490 and it is also a 55mm. I use the 55mm uv/haze filter for lens protection. Why would you buy an additional step down ring and a 52mm filter if you don't need one. Correct me if I am wrong on this. I do agree with you on using the UV filter. I have no light loss with it as a protection filter.
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Old Apr 2, 2006, 7:31 AM   #4
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Old Jim wrote:
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Norm in Fujino,

I am not sure where you get your information. The adaptor for the P880 is advertised as a 55mm. I have the 6490 and it is also a 55mm. I use the 55mm uv/haze filter for lens protection.
Sorry if I'm wrong, but I wondered about the OP's question and so looked up some reviews. According to the DCRP review, "The lens itself has 52 mm threads for adding filters. For adding a conversion lens you'll need the optional conversion lens adapter, which bumps the thread size up to 55 mm." I honestly don't know the camera involved, so I'm not sure which is right, but I read the quote as meaning that ordinary 52mm filters can be attached, but for conversion lenses you need a step-up ring.


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Old Apr 2, 2006, 7:48 AM   #5
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LOL, I guess in a way we are both right. A 52mm filter will fit on the lens. If you are using the lens adaptor then it will accept a 55mm filter. I think in this case it would benefit the OP to buy the step up/down ring which would be less expensive than two sets of filters.Thanks for the link. In my case the adaptor is always on so I can protect my main lens with the UV filter.

Cheers!
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Old Apr 2, 2006, 8:42 AM   #6
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Old Jim wrote:
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...the step up/down ring ...
It is almost always never a good idea to get a step down adapter - is is very likely to cause vigneting at the wide end of the zoom. About the only time I can think of to use a step down is if you already have a good macro add-on lens and are going to use it only at the long end of the zoom.

You should consider a lens shade instead of a UV filter for protection. The shade will stop a lot of things (rain, snow, twigs, ...) getting to the lens. Not as complete protection, but pretty good without introducing flare - in fact the shade should reduce flare.
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Old Apr 2, 2006, 8:57 AM   #7
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Thanks BillDrew. So much to learn. I agree with you. In my case there is so much blow sand here in the desert that I am willing to make a compromise and chance the consequences. I hope the OP has benefited from our discussion.

P.S. I forgot to add that I do use a shade along with the filter.
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Old Apr 2, 2006, 2:03 PM   #8
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kodak customer support informed me that i must use their adapter be for using any other lens accessory. i'm being told that the threads on the acutal lens are not standard therefore needing to buy they're adapter ring. I'd prefer not to due to the vignetting effect. BUT there appears to be different "grades" (cost differences) btwn the skylight filters... the ND... and UV's. should I go with the most expensive, less distortion ???
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Old Apr 2, 2006, 4:55 PM   #9
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J.Sato wrote:
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kodak customer support informed me that i must use their adapter be for using any other lens accessory. i'm being told that the threads on the acutal lens are not standard therefore needing to buy they're adapter ring. I'd prefer not to due to the vignetting effect. BUT there appears to be different "grades" (cost differences) btwn the skylight filters... the ND... and UV's. should I go with the most expensive, less distortion ???
Once again, DON'T buy an N.D. filter if you're only wanting lens protection. It is not what you need. Get a UV filter of standard grade--or even better, just buy a lens hood that doesn't cause any vignetting. When my Olympus C-755 was my main camera, I had the same kind of adapter tube on it, and used a skylight or UV filter on it, but more often just a lens hood.




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Old Apr 3, 2006, 9:56 PM   #10
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thanks for the info. uv or skylight sounds good to me... and (going back to part of the original question) i guess the numbers on an ND filter means how many f stops it drops ???
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