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Old Apr 9, 2006, 5:42 PM   #1
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This may be a really dumb question but please bare with me as I am new to digital photography and have ALOT to learn!!

My question is: Is there a big difference in picture quality between two cameras with different MP's anda simularzoom? In other words, say you're comparing a Fuji Finepix S5200 and a Fuji Finepix S9000. One has 5 MP's and a 10X zoom and the other has 9 MP's and a 10.7X zoom. Is there alot of difference in the grain of the photo when comparing both cameras? I'm talking regular(4X6) photos. Is there a great deal of difference in an enlarged phot? Say, an 8X10?? :?

Does anyone have photos I could look at and compare? Thanks so much!! Hope my questions were not too out there!! :?


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Old Apr 9, 2006, 5:51 PM   #2
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barrelracer wrote:
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Does anyone have photos I could look at and compare?
We have samples in every review here (last page of each review), and you'll usually find some of the same subjects in each camera's samples to make them easier to compare:

http://www.steves-digicams.com/hardware_reviews.html

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Old Apr 9, 2006, 5:58 PM   #3
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Thanks Jim!

One more question..If you use the highest ISO setting on both cameras(1600), will the 9 MP's be sharper than the 5 MP's? I know that the higher the ISO the grainier the photo. Just wondering if higher MP cameras help this?
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Old Apr 9, 2006, 6:28 PM   #4
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barrelracer wrote:
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One more question..If you use the highest ISO setting on both cameras(1600), will the 9 MP's be sharper than the 5 MP's? I know that the higher the ISO the grainier the photo. Just wondering if higher MP cameras help this?
I don't think you *really* want to use ISO 1600 from these cameras (at least not at larger print sizes).

I have not compared the images in detail, which is why I didn't try to answer your original questions about it.

You could always downsize some of the samples, print them and compare the prints (we've got ISO 800 images from both cameras in the samples).

Sometimes, a higher megapixel model can have higher noise, just because of smaller photosites, all else being equal.

But, everything is never equal. The sensor designs for these cameras is very different.

From a quick glance at the ISO 800 images, I see less noise in the images from the S5200. But, I didn't try to compare detail in the images at equivalent sizes either (or check to see which model was capturing more detail at higher ISO speeds).

The lens on the S5200 is about twice as bright on the long end versus the lens on the S9000. So, that would be something to consider (you may need to use ISO 800 on the S9000 to get shutter speeds as fast as you could using the S5200 at ISO 400 if you plan on staying towards the long end of the lens more). On the wide end, the S9000 has a *very* small advantage in lens brightness (not enough to worry about).

Sometimes when you downsize an image, noise is less apparent. Also, newer models tend to use pretty sophisticated noise reduction techniques in the camera processing. This can often reduce the appearance of noise, at the expense of detail.

What kind of conditions do you plan on using a camera in?

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Old Apr 9, 2006, 6:53 PM   #5
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I would be using the cameras for taking photos at rodeos and horse shows(super fast speed and dim lighting). I have the S5200 but have not had a chance to use it yet (for the purpose I bought it)as i have not had it that long. The S9000 has a few more features so i was really curious about just how different the cameras were. I am just trying to learn all I can. I had a wonderful film camera, a Nikon N90 that had an awesome motor drive. I really miss that feature for fast action!! I hope to someday advance to a digital SLR, with hopes that I can get the same performance from one of those that i got from my Nikon. Thanks for your help!
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Old Apr 9, 2006, 7:01 PM   #6
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That would be the way to go (DSLR) for any kind of night events. Do you still have any lenses for Nikon?

If so, you can pick up a factory reconditioned Nikon D50 body for $399 at http://www.beachcamera.com (a.k.a., http://www.buydig.com )

mtclimber mentioned getting one at that price there recently.

You really need a DSLR shooting at higher ISO speeds if you plan on stopping action in dim lighting (and a well lit stadium is dim light to a camera). You'll also need a bright lens to go with one, though (which will probably cost a lot more than the camera body). A kit lens won't cut it. You'll want something much brighter.

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Old Apr 9, 2006, 7:07 PM   #7
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I do still have a couple of lenses for my Nikon. I will definitly check into the Nikon that you mentioned! Is it easy to use a digital SLR. I had learned how to use my Nikon very well. To the point where I only used it on Manual, not Auto. Pictures are just so much better and you can do so much more using the manual option. I was concerned that a Digital SLR would be difficult to use. Is it basically the same as a film SLR??
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Old Apr 9, 2006, 7:24 PM   #8
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There are more features available. But, yes, it's going to function in a similar manner. Dynamic range is a bit different with digital (you need to learn to expose for the highlights, like you would shooting transparencies).

But, you shouldn't have any problems if you've used a film SLR. The viewfinder is smaller with the DSLR compared to your N90 (so that will take some getting used to). But, I doubt you'd have a problem.

It's also got a full Auto mode if you need to use it while getting used to the camera.

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Old Apr 9, 2006, 7:41 PM   #9
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Thanks alot Jim! I really appreciate all of the help!:-)
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Old Apr 9, 2006, 8:43 PM   #10
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barrelracer wrote:
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Thanks alot Jim! I really appreciate all of the help!:-)
No problem. But, to repeat what I mentioned earlier, make sure you get a bright lens for night use in dim lighting at your shows if you go with a DSLR solution.

I'd suggest something along the lines of a 70-200mm f/2.8 (which will cost you more than the body). Sigma has one that runs around $800 (Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 EX HSM) that is well liked. A Nikkor with that focal range and brightness will cost you more.

If budget won't permit, you can find less expensive primes (versus zooms).

Or, go used. My favorite vendors for used gear:

http://www.keh.com

http://www.bhphotovideo.com

http://www.adorama.com

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