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Old Apr 12, 2003, 9:24 PM   #1
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Default My Photos are all dark :(

I purchased a Toshiba PDR-M71 about a year and a half ago. It seems that all my photos are dark except up cloase shots. I have been at several events where several people took pics. Mine always seem dark and theirs look great.

I figured maybe it was just a bum camera, so I purchased a Nikon 3100. I brought it home tonight and took a ton of pics. 90% of them seem dark. I am taking indoor pics at various range and lighting.

Now, I assume it must be me. The Nikon is returnable, so I am trying to get some imput before I make a final decision.

Any help would be really appreciated!!

Thanks!!
Gary
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Old Apr 13, 2003, 7:32 AM   #2
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Gary,

According to Steve's reviews, the maximum range of the built-in flash on both your cameras is 9.8 feet.

I suspect you're expecting too much of these little flashes. If your outdoor shots are OK and indoor close ups are also correctly exposed, then all you need to do is know the limitations of your equipment and work within them.

fenlander
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Old Apr 13, 2003, 2:48 PM   #3
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You could also try a higher iso rating, slower shutter speed and larger aperature size.
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Old Apr 14, 2003, 12:07 PM   #4
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built in flashes are pretty wimpy. Also, make sure you are not holding the camera in such a way that you are blocking the flash. This is a very common user error when it comes to little point an shoot cameras.
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Old Apr 20, 2003, 8:31 PM   #5
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Without any pics to examine, we can only speculate. Here's one tip that may be helpful:

Is there anything white or bright in the foreground that would reflect the camera's flash and tell the camera the picture is properly exposed? If so, be sure no bright objects are in the foreground of your shots.
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Old Apr 20, 2003, 9:13 PM   #6
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heres a good tip
get closer.
All flashes have a limited range, and most only work well in the middle of their range.

heres a couple of examples of flash range and uses:


I this one, my GF took a pic, flash fired, and you see the result.
I was out of range of the flash, so the pic was dark.



Here I used the flash to 'fill in' the shadow at the base of the wall.
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Old Apr 22, 2003, 8:02 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macleod76
heres a good tip
get closer.
All flashes have a limited range, and most only work well in the middle of their range.

heres a couple of examples of flash range and uses:


I this one, my GF took a pic, flash fired, and you see the result.
I was out of range of the flash, so the pic was dark.
well, the mountain dew box came out OK. This is a case where something in the foreground reflected the light back the camera and "tricked" it into thinking that the subject received enough light.
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Old Apr 23, 2003, 6:21 PM   #8
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Quote:
well, the mountain dew box came out OK. This is a case where something in the foreground reflected the light back the camera and "tricked" it into thinking that the subject received enough light.

I see that. :lol:
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Old Apr 23, 2003, 6:49 PM   #9
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Quote:
This is a case where something in the foreground reflected the light back the camera and "tricked" it into thinking that the subject received enough light.
But then if you'd used the flash on a manual setting, the foreground would have been flared/over-exposed/white clipped, and you'd have discovered digicams don't have as much latitude (range of brightness) as film, and slave flash units or bounce flash is really useful!

If it's external, Block the camera flash sensor temporarily and see how much light you can get out of the flash. You will also see how the foreground can be very overexposed, but at least it gives an idea of the 'range' you might get. With internal flash you sometimes have to accept the rapid fall off in light and bring it back a bit in editing with brightness and contrast tools.
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