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Old May 29, 2006, 7:17 PM   #21
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Thanks for the reply. I understand what you are saying. Though it appears the photos are just out of focus and not blurred fromcamera shake or the motion of the subject. I was shooting at 1/640, f3.7, SP mode, ISO 100 a full zoom using a x1.7 telephoto adapter...so i think that converts to a focal length of about 734mm. So maybe I should have used 1/740?? Though the photos seem unfocused as opposed to blurred.
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Old May 29, 2006, 8:11 PM   #22
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If you think it's focusing issue, I would suggest you focus on *where* you think the action would be (ie, where the players would be going) and lock it there, and take the picture when they get there. Make sure you have the camera on continuous shot mode. This worked for me on a car race I went to, but cars stay on tracks, so I know where they will be. It was just a matter of timing them, as they fly by.

Also, you can try using aperture priority and set it to f/8, that way depth of field will not be much of an issue. But lighting will affect your results, so increase the ISO, if needed. And just clean up the noise using software (I use Noiseware's free version: http://www.imagenomic.com/).

'Hope this helps.

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Old May 29, 2006, 9:35 PM   #23
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Thanx very much for your help/suggestions. I will try what you say.

Cheers :-)


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Old May 29, 2006, 11:32 PM   #24
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Sorry, I forgot to ask you what auto focus method you prefer. With the Sony H1 there are 3 auto focus modes...multi, centre and spot. I have been using either spot or centre. I was wondering though whether spot would beappropriatefor action shots from a distance. It seems tome that spot focus is very accurate and if you happen to stray off the target (which is easy to dowith kids playing football)then you'll end up with out of focus pictures. I've been tempted to use multi focus but i hear so many people saying that's its no good cos it takes too long to gain focus and is not very accurate, especially for action shots.

:|
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Old May 29, 2006, 11:47 PM   #25
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I use single area (ie the middle) all the time. The multi or dynamic focus, are only useful in sports if the action is coming towards you, like if you're behind the basketball goal post, since the players stay in your viewfinder almost the whole time, and just move a little as they get bigger, as they get closer to you. But if you're taking pictures of sport action that goes side to side from your point of view, it doesn't help much, from my experience.

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Old Jun 2, 2006, 1:49 AM   #26
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Thanx for your replys. I've come to two possible conlclusions: (1) I'm not very good at photography :?and/or (2) I'm expecting too much from my camera. But I'm still having fun so I guess that counts for something. :G

Cheers




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Old Jun 6, 2006, 4:17 PM   #27
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Great info guys!!! I'm a newbie myself (just got me a Fuji s5200) and I'm extremely excited to find all this info in just one thread.

Thank you all!
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Old May 9, 2008, 10:18 AM   #28
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I have just spent my savings on a helium balloon with remote controllable camera. (Sony DSC V3).

I have no instructions for the best settings etc to take aerial photography from a helium balloon (which moves in wind) and want to know if AP or SP will suit me best.

I want the sky to be as blue as possible which on AP with 2.8 aperture does not seem to be so good! This chooses a shutter speed of 500 - 1000 on a sunny day.

I just want to know re: depth of field and sky colours etc which settings you would recommend.








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Old May 9, 2008, 12:54 PM   #29
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PhilipSmyth

Your best bet would be to start a new thread about it in our Sony forum, so that you'd be more likely to get responses from members familiar with settings on your camera model.

But, the aperture you choose isn't going to make any difference from an exposure perspective (how bright or dark the camera is exposing the scene shooting in Aperture Priority mode. The camera is still metering it the same in Av (Aperture Value, a.k.a., Aperture Priority) Mode. ;-) So, if you pick f/2.8 and the camera decides 1/1000 second is needed versus using f/4 where the camera will decide 1/500 second for the same lighting and scene, the brightness of the resulting image (which will impact how dark/blue the sky looks) will be identical.

That's because if you choose an aperture that's only letting through half the light to the camera's sensor (an aperture of f/4 only lets in half the light that a setting of f/2.8 would), the camera is going to choose a shutter speed that's half as fast to make up for it, giving you the exact same exposure with both aperture settings using Av mode (by using a slower or faster shutter speed to give you the same exposure for a smaller or larger aperture iris opening).

As far away as you'd be from your primary subjects with this type of camera (Depth of Field should not be an issue at further focus distances), it probably wouldn't hurt to keep it set wider (around f/4), provided the shutter speed needed didn't exceed the fastest speed supported by your camera in brighter light using lower ISO speeds. If you want faster shutter speeds than you're getting, increase ISO speed (each time you double it, shutter speeds will be twice as fast for the same lighting and aperture setting).

Then, use Exposure Compensation to get a darker exposure if you want the sky to retain more color. The camera will use a faster shutter speed for a given aperture setting when you use a -EV setting with Exposure Compensation (needle in the viewfinder to the left of center), allowing you to control the camera's metering behavior if you want a darker exposure that it would take by default. A +EV setting (needle to the right of center) with Exposure Compensation will do the opposite (give you a brighter exposure than the camera's metering would choose, by using a slower shutter speed for a given aperture setting in Aperture Priority mode).

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Old Aug 9, 2008, 10:38 PM   #30
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algold wrote:
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Hi, Gina.

AP and SP are semi-automatic camera modes, i.e. you choose manually one parameter and the camera sets the corresponding parameter to get a correctly exposed image according to camera's light metering and ISO settings. Which mode to choose depends on your subject and the effect you are after. Generally speaking, aperture setting controls depth-of-field (DOF, a distance range where all subjects are in focus) and shutter speed controls movement.

For example, when you shoot a portrait you want your model's features¬*to be sharp and an out-of-focus, blurred background. So in AP mode you set aperture to low F-numbers (F2.8, F3.5) and when you half-press the shutter button your camera sets focus and the appropriate shutter speed.

In close-up and macro you want DOF as large as possible, so again in AP mode you set aperture to high F-number (F8, F11) to get as many details as possible in focus.

If you shoot a motorace and want to get a sharp picture without motion blur you set a high shutter speed (1/500, 1/1000 sec) and the camera sets the appropriate aperture.

If you want to get a dreamy silky effect when you shoot a waterfall, set your shutter to a slow speed (1/30, 0.5-3 sec). To avoid a camera shake you can use a tripod.

With image stabilization you can get sharp pics while handholding your camera with relatively slow shutter speed (~1/20 sec).

If you set one parameter (aperture or shutter speed) and the camera can't set the correct corresponding parameter, or it's out of camera's range, you usually get some kind of warning in a viewfinder or LCD.¬*

HTH,

Alex
I found your post while browsing random forums on this site and I just wanted to say thanks for your explanation and different examples. The examples gave me a decent idea of when and where I could use the different modes for similar experiences. Although I still have MUCH to learn it is the perfect start im looking for.

Thanks!
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