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Old May 14, 2006, 4:15 PM   #1
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For no apparent reason, every picture I now take with my Sony DSC-F717 is way overexposed - almost pure white. I've tried "resetting" everything back to original settings (reset button near battery), to no avail.

Is this something I need to take to a dealer to get fixed, or is there something that I'm missing?

Any input would be appreciated.

Thanks
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Old May 14, 2006, 5:09 PM   #2
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If you really did reset the camera to factory defaults and you are still getting this problem, that sounds like cause for concern.

Check out your menu and see whether you have the exposure compensation function activated. If it is, and it's set to a positive value, that could cause consistent overexposure.

Grant
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Old May 14, 2006, 6:48 PM   #3
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getting there. I checked exposure compensation as you suggested - bracket step for taken 3 shot burst. I shoot the 3 shot burst, and the images come ou great. When I go back to single shot, still over exposed. Am going to play with it more, but if you all have any other ideas, let me know.
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Old May 16, 2006, 12:50 AM   #4
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bdemarko, are you sure that you checked out the exposure compensation setting and not the exposure bracketing setting?

When you talk about the three shot burst, and refer to it as "bracketing," it sounds to me like you were using the exposure bracketing feature. This usually works by taking at least three shots -- one at the camera-recommended exosure, one at increased exposure from the recommended and one at decreased exposure. This feature has no effect on single exposures. What I'm referring to is an "exposure compensation" feature. This does affect single exposures and works by either increasing or decreasing the cameras recommended exposure of every shot you take. Your camera will do this up to +/- 2EV. If this feature is active and set to a high positive value, most of your shots will be overexposed.

I see that the F717 has a "NightShot" mode. I don't have this camera, so I don't know the effect this would have if you used it in normal lighting conditions, but check to see if that mode is enabled.

I hope that one of these is the case, because otherwise, I got nothin'!

Grant
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Old May 16, 2006, 2:11 AM   #5
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There is no exposure compensation function that I can see on my F717.

The LCD does tend to show the photos as over-exposed, but it is fine when viewed on computer.

The bracket step is not relevant to the exposure rating - try reducing the exposure value option in the menu to smaller increments.




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Old May 16, 2006, 6:26 AM   #6
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ELDDJOC wrote:
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There is no exposure compensation function that I can see on my F717.
That little button next to shutter release...

http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/sonydscf717/page5.asp

Exposure compensation happens to be one of the most important adjustments so I wonder how you haven't found it.
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Old May 17, 2006, 1:24 PM   #7
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ET is right the 717 as well as the 707 have exposure compensation -2/+2.
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Old May 17, 2006, 7:29 PM   #8
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Thank you all for your suggestions.

I adjusted the exposure compensation setting ("that little button next to the shutter release") - stepping it thru the entire range from +2.0ev to -2.0ev)and taking shots - to no avail.

Also checked the Night Shot setting - no go there either.

Guess I'll see what the folks at the camera shop have to say.
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Old May 18, 2006, 5:30 AM   #9
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Oops - I get it now - by the Exposure Compensation - you mean the EVF ?


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Old May 18, 2006, 6:33 AM   #10
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ELDDJOC wrote:
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Oops - I get it now - by the Exposure Compensation - you mean the EVF ?


Exposure Compensation lets you alter the way a camera is exposinganimage (brighten or darken it compared to the way the camera meteredthe scene). It's one of my most frequently used settings on most cameras.

A +EV value gives you a brighter exposure. The camera uses a slower shutter speed and/or larger aperture to get a brighter exposure, compared to what the camera's autoexposure algorithms would have selected.

A -EV value gives you a darker exposure. The camera uses a faster shutter speed and/or smaller aperture to get a darker exposure, compared to what the camera's autoexposure algorithms would have selected.

Correct Exposure comes down to the amount of light, the ISO speed, and the aperture. A variety of combinations will produce identical exposure. You only need to use Exposure Compensation if you want a brighter or darker image compared to what the camera's autoexposure would normally give you in the same conditions.

An example of when you may want to use a +EV setting is for a backlit subject, where the subject would normally be much darker than the rest of the image. Since the camera has a limited dynamic range, it doesn't know that you want the dark subject exposed properly (at the expense of the rest of the image). If you brighten the exposure for one part, the rest may be overexposed.

If your subject is much brighter than the rest of the image, you may want to use a -EV setting for Exposure Compensation so that your subject is not overexposed (making the rest of the image darker, too).

The camera has a limited range of bright to dark that it can capture. So, it makes choices so that most of the iimage is correctly exposed, depending on your metering mode. Sometimes that may not be what you want. That's where exposure compensation comes in.


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