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Old Jun 12, 2006, 6:46 PM   #1
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Okay, I'm buying a camera that supports RAW, Jpeg and TIFF.

I was wondering which type I should save my photo's as, the camera is 5.1MP (Kodak P850) and I will be using a standard speed SD card with 1GB of space... if somebody could lay out the pro's and con's of each card, that would be great.
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Old Jun 12, 2006, 8:44 PM   #2
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Some good reading here, http://www.photo.net/learn/raw/

Basically if you want immediate access to your photos and want to print them with little in the way of post processing then go for the highest quality jpeg, as typically you camera will be faster taking jpegs only plus your card will be able to hold a lot more.

A jpeg can be read by practically any computer in the world and displayed in firefox, internet explorer etc by default, a raw file cannot.

If you are semi professional or better and can spend time processing each picture then raw is the way to go , you don't have access to your prints immediately they need converting to tiff orjpeg, but you get the most pure "data" in the files.

You can play with contrast , white balance , sharpness etc as you like and are not relying on inbuilt camera settings that you may not agree with ie the way a camera sharpens or applies contrast is set by a technician thousands of miles away as a general best , raw allows you to set and play with everything yourself.

Then again while you are busy processing the RAW files into something you canactually print, the person who took jpegs has already printed the first 100 out and is showing them round their friends !




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Old Jun 12, 2006, 9:04 PM   #3
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Thank you very much! I think I will go with Jpegs for the time being as I'm a new photographer and I don't have any image editing software (unless you count Paint... and even I know thats a crummy image editor). But I will rest easy knowing that if the need presents itself, my camera supports RAW, thanks again.
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Old Jun 12, 2006, 9:47 PM   #4
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No problems!

If you are really, really serious about photography then the only realistic program to get for editing photosis the hyper expensive Adobe Photoshop.

However the cut down version Photoshop Elements has 80% of what Photoshop has at a reasonable price.

You could also try Paint Shop Pro.

You could always look for a "cheap" version (cough) of Photoshop on ebay...
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Old Jun 12, 2006, 10:12 PM   #5
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I think that as I get better at it, I might want to invest in one of the cheaper versions of photoshop... my local Future Shop has some older versions for about $130... and I'm told that they work fine for all but the most advanced photo-editing.
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Old Jun 15, 2006, 4:01 AM   #6
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No need to spend a penny or wait! Get the Gimp for free, download at:

http://www.gimp.org/windows/

Or PhotoPlus 6 at:

http://www.freeserifsoftware.com/



Either will serve your needs for some time, I would recommend the Gimp, it takes a while to learn, but is a powerful editor and after you have gained some experience you will know what extra features you need if you need something more.

Max



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Old Jun 21, 2006, 12:45 PM   #7
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Another freebie is Picasa. It's a decent photo organizer/viewer with some neat basic editing functions built in. Good for quick and dirty editing when you don't want to spend a lot of time at the computer. Plus, you have to love an editor that has a "I'm feeling lucky" button!
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Old Jun 21, 2006, 3:12 PM   #8
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Morag2,

I'll also second the notion of Photoshop Elements. The real benefit to Photoshop and Photoshop Elements is that there are a lot of people using them and there are a lot of books published for them. So, when you want to accomplish a specific thing, it is easier to research HOW to accomplish the feat in those software products.

I had Paintshop Pro for about a year and it was a great piece of software but I couldn't find as much information about how to do things. When I moved to the photoshop camp there are tons of books on how-to using this software and plenty of users. Other software packages may be just as good or even better, but that broader pool of resources has been a big help to me.

Just another way of looking at it.
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Old Jun 22, 2006, 10:25 PM   #9
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Thanks John, well I'm in the process of learning Serif Photoplus, I might upgrade to Elements when I have the money (right now I'm spending all my extra cash on a high-speed memory card and a cleaning kit)
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