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Old May 11, 2003, 2:25 PM   #11
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Everybody's very quiet about 16x9 (1:1.77) for the shape of new flat panel plasma panel TV's!

Perhaps we'll all just have to get used to black bands! Any thoughts from the landscape shooters? It seems there's a legacy of aspect ratios around. Is it paper print sizes driving the standards, the individual ccd makers (Kodak use 1:1.5), photographers/movie makers/current pc graphics standards?

What do the real photographers (and their clients) prefer for composition when the thing you can't easily change in any camera, is its aspect ratio?
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Old May 12, 2003, 6:39 PM   #12
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LG,

Thanks for the informative answer on the 4:3 vs 3:2 aspect ratio. I'm rather new to all this digital editing myself. On my latest batch of pictures I printed I have one picuture in particular where I want to crop out both sides a bit to get in tighter. When you are cropping, how do you know your crop is going to work with th 3:2 ratio? Can briefly describe how you do this?

thanks
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Old May 12, 2003, 9:42 PM   #13
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It depends on your photo editing tool, but @ least in Photoshop if you enter 3" and 2" (or 4" and 3"), you then just have to drag the corner of the crop tool to size and the aspect ratio will stay constant! 8) 8) 8)

Vox can try his 16" by 9" too... :lol: :lol: :lol:
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Old May 12, 2003, 11:31 PM   #14
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mdparker, I usually do it the other way around.... for most of my crops I want to ensure that they fill up the computer screen completely, or in the 4:3 ratio. Let me just explain how I do that, and you can just do the inverse:

It really helps to know the standard screen resolutions:
640x480, 800x600, 1024x768, 1280x960, 1600x1200. Since all of these are perfect 4:3 ratios, just use your crop tool to select the subject you want, and see which of these is closest to what you want to frame.

Then, resize your crop tool to the closest resolution. Try moving the crop area around to see if you can make this fit your needs. If so, then crop it! You may have to magnify or reduce your viewing area until you can see all of your selection.

If you decide you just MUST crop out that distracting object in the corner, or it needs to be enlarged just a little more, then you'll have to bring up your calculator and go to work. Set one side of your crop rectangle to the pixel size you want, and then figure out the other dimension using the ratio you need (e.g., if your frame is 1132 pixels wide, multiply it by the inverse of the ratio you want-- for 4:3, multiply 1132 by 3 and divide by 4 (0.75) to get the height you want-- 849 pixels in this case).

I hope that isn't too taxing, but that's the way I do it! For printing perfect 4"x6" prints, just keep the ratio of pixels the same (400x600, 600x900, 800x1200, etc.) to keep from having to "do the math."
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Old May 13, 2003, 12:09 PM   #15
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Thank you both for your comments. I guess I'll just have to play around a bit to get the hang of it.
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