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Old May 12, 2003, 12:39 PM   #1
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Default Sunlight / Cloudy Photos Help!

Hi Everyone,
I'm going to be taking photos of a graduation this weekend. I am wondering if it is a sunny day out, I probably should set the camera to 50 ISO and White Balance SUNNY. Right?

Then the question is If I am taking photos of the people in groups, do I have the sun on their faces with my back to the sun? Should I try to get them in shade? If they are in shade do I raise the ISO or use flash?

What about camera settings and positioning the subjects on a cloudy overcast day? Higher ISO? White Balance CLOUDY ? What about where they should pose and I should stand?


Thank you all for your assistance, I'm not an official photographer, but my friends are all relying on me to do my best.

BTW I am shooting with a Canon S400

Thanks,
Matt
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Old May 12, 2003, 12:48 PM   #2
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Quote:
to 50 ISO and White Balance SUNNY. Right?
Always keep the ISO as low as pos to minimise noise.

Sun to there backs or they'll all squint and it casts shadows under there eyes and noses - not very flattering.

The sun should be quite high (better than low). Make sure you expose for the people and not the bright sky behind or use fill-in flash if in range.

Try it both ways if you like or as you suggest get to a shady area.

Do use a lens hood if you have one to help prevent lens flare.

Use bracketting to ensure the correct exposure - digital costs nothing so take loads of shots.

Take some shots when they're not expecting it to avoid cheesy grins like onother one straight after the first when they're more relaxed.

That would be my approach but I'm no expert with portrait type work - good luck.
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Old May 12, 2003, 7:13 PM   #3
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Sun to their backs??? that looks awful 'cos the camera overcompensates and underexposes.
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Old May 12, 2003, 7:34 PM   #4
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Well the sun has to be somewhere? I'm assuming that Steve was stating that you use spot metering on the people or something like that so that the sunlight is compensated for?

Anyone?



Thanks Steve6 & Alfisti
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Old May 12, 2003, 8:08 PM   #5
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Does your camera have RAW capability? If so, use it. It lets you set the white balance after taking the pictures. Canon RAW (CRAW) is worthwhile...

Use the "P" mode to maximize your options...
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Old May 12, 2003, 11:22 PM   #6
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Nope. No Raw setting on my camera, but thanks.
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Old May 13, 2003, 1:15 PM   #7
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Sun to their backs??? that looks awful 'cos the camera overcompensates and underexposes.
Assuming you decide to have the sun to their backs this is where the photographer should know what they are doing.

For a big family and friends pic where the faces are small and distant then it might be ok to have the sun in their faces but for close-ups, as far as I'm concerned, keep it to their backs.

Once again, if in doubt do it both ways or pray for a dull day.
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