Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digicam Help > Newbie Help

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Jul 24, 2006, 7:35 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2
Default

Hi, I have always enjoyed photography, but with one of my many point and shoot cameras. I just bought my first SLR. I bought the Olympus Evolt E-500 with the 2 lens kit. I also bought a photography for dummies book that I need to have time to read. I know almost nothing about shutter speed, apeture etc. I need more zoom...the lens that came in kit goes to 150mm...I want more! Do I have to buy the 300 mm lens or is there any kind of adapter, whatever to make objects far away closer? Also are zoom and telephoto the same? Thanks! Tam
Ozzlil is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Jul 24, 2006, 7:51 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 41
Default

Ozzlil an adaptor will get you from 150-300 but at a loss of quality and less light getting through the lens which may mean you can't autofocus I am afraid I don't know in the case of your particular camera.

It will always be better to get alonger lens in terms of quality.

On your camera atelephoto is any lens which is longer than about 35mm, or if you preferany which makes objects seem closer than they are.A zoom is a lens with variable focal lengths like both of the kit lenses you describe.

I know you want a longer reach, we all do, but if I were you I'd read the book, look on these forumsand take lots and lotsof pictures with the lenses you have to get used to things, sometimes it's more fun to have to get closer or look at things in a different way.

What kind of things do you like to photograph?

VinnyP! is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 25, 2006, 8:07 AM   #3
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

Great advice from VinnyP.

Learn photography first and start to refine your abilities before diving in and spending yet more money. There are two important reasons I would vote against buying another lens so early:

1. You're just starting out and not sure what the requirements are besides "more reach" - there is no one size fits all lens - there are many lenses available that have 300mm but they're not all the same. You need to refine what your needs are before determining which longer lens is right for your needs.

2. The paper weight syndrome. This happens to people that feel they need another lens just for a specific focal length - they end up with 5 or 6 lenses and only use 1 or 2 of them. You just bought 2 lenses with your camera which you admit you have yet to learn (and that's ok - we all have to start some where) and your rushing to buy a third.

I agree with Vinny - take your time and work with the equipment you have. You'd be surprised what can open up to you when you use your feet instead of your zoom.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 25, 2006, 8:07 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 851
Default

VinnyP! wrote:
Quote:
On your camera a¬*telephoto is any lens which is longer than about 35mm, or if you prefer¬*any which makes objects seem closer than they are.¬*A zoom is a lens with variable focal lengths like both of the kit lenses you describe.¬*
On a 35mm camera, anything longer than around 45-60mm is considered telephoto, and anything shorter than that is considered wide angle. So 35mm would be considered wide angle.

I suppose with digital SLR's and the so called crop factor, 'technically' that may have changed.

You can get a tele-extender lens that fits between your camera body and the lens to extend the focal length. As stated, this will also make the effective aperature of the lens slower, thus making things like AF more difficult.

Although there are some good quality tele-extenders out there, generally you are better off buying a dedicated lens.

Telephoto refers to any focal length longer than about 60mm, while zoom refers to a lens than has a variable focal length. Zooms can be wide angle, telephoto, or both. For example a wide zoom would be 12-24mm, a telephoto zoom would be 70-300mm and one that covered both would be 24-120mm.
amazingthailand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 25, 2006, 1:51 PM   #5
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 2
Default

Thanks for all the help, I just starting reading my book, so much to learn! I take alot of pictures in my yard- flowers, pets. I was asking about a 300 mm lens becuase I am also a Nascar fan and like to take pictures at the track from the stand. Just for my info...the 150 mm lens I have...you'd that "zoom in" less or more then the 12x optical zoom on my point and shoot?
Ozzlil is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 25, 2006, 5:28 PM   #6
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 851
Default

On dSLR's the magnification 'x' factor is not really used, mainly because it is misleading. It really only tells you the range between the wide and the telephoto end of the focal length.

for example: a 24-120mm lens is 5x (120/24=5x)
a 70-200mm lens is 2.8x (200/70=2.8x)

Yet the 200mm will yeild a closer image than the 120mm.

You p&s 12x camera, somewhere, should have it's 35mm equivalent focal length listed. That, you can compare to your 150mm lens. I suspect it is somewhat longer, probably between 300 to 400mm.
amazingthailand is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 25, 2006, 9:42 PM   #7
rey
Senior Member
 
rey's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 949
Default

Ozzlil,
Here's a couple of good photog website:

http://www.morguefile.com/archive/classroom.php
http://www.canon.co.jp/Imaging/enjoydslr/index.html



rey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Jul 28, 2006, 6:11 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 183
Default

Let's forget the "12X" digcam stuff for a moment and look at the post from amazingthailand. Most camera companies use the standard of a 35mm film camera to measure the field of view for their lenses, with a 50mm lens being consideredthe "normal eyesight" perspective. Anything less is wide angle: more is telephoto. As most (not all) digital SLR's have a sensor smaller than a frame of 35mm film, there is a "crop", or magnification factor applied by the lens. In the case of your E-500 it's 2x, or twice the lenses stated range. Your 14-45 becomes a 28-90 and the 40-150 becomes an 80-300. The kit lenses are designed to cover a range from wide to tele for general purpose shooting. Yes, you can add the Olympus telextender and increase by another 1.4X (300 x 1.4 = 420) but at the loss of light/quality and I believe autofocus (on your particular lenses) mentioned elsewhere. Not to mention the @ $350 US additional cost.Be sitting down when you price the 300mm lens from Olympus! I know that Sigma makes a 50-200 (i.e 100-400) lens for the Olympus mount for around $150 US. Not the same quality or sharpness, especially at the edges from what I've read (photozone.de) but it's a less expensive alternative to more "zoom-zoom" (sorry Mazda).
stowaway7 is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 2:26 AM.