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Old Aug 13, 2006, 12:33 PM   #1
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I know what cropping is per say, but can someone please elaborte on it in terms of digital pictures? Do this mean that you can enlarge the picture you took and crop the area that you want to keep? This is what makes a higher megapixel camera gibe a better image? Please correct or add on to what I said.

Thanks- Ken


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Old Aug 13, 2006, 1:57 PM   #2
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In general, you are correct. Cropping is taking a section of the image and making that section the complete picture - i.e. cutting it out, discarding the rest and possibly (although not necessarily) enlarging the result.

But each photographic image has only so many pixels in it. Whenever you crop and resize you spread those pixels farther apart. At some point, you start to see a breakdown of the image when you view it closely.

But, don't be mislead by the whole more megapixels is better marketing junk. It's the quality of the pixels that count and the pixel density. For instance a 6mp DSLR like the Canon 350 or Nikon D50 will create a better image file than an 8 or 10 megapixel digicam - because the DSLRs have a larger sensor the quality of each pixel gets better. There are more tech-savvy people than I that can better explain WHY this is the case.

There are also other down sides to more megapixels. For instance the Nikon D200 10 mp camera has worse noise performance than the Nikon D50 at 6mp - say it isn't so?!!!! More megapixels isn't always better?!!!!! That is correct - more is not necessarily better. Sometimes it is but you have to look at the whole camera and how it performs in the conditions you will be using it in.
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Old Aug 13, 2006, 2:28 PM   #3
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Hi John,

Thanks again for your comments. I think I owe you a beer or bottle of wine or seomething.

The reaon I posted that quesion as because I am narrowing down my choices of dslr's. I decided againest the Nikon D200 and the frontrunner is the Canon D30. I of the pluses of the Nikon but I feel I would be happier with the Canon.

I am also contemplating the Canon 5D full frame.Full frame sounds interesting. I understand from this camera that upon cropping, the pics would be better than the 30D. On the other hand, I thinkI read that maybe the pics would not be as good on non cropping with 8x10's and smaller. Something to do with pixel size and density? Would you be able to elaborate on this, or dispute it? Also since I will not be taking portraits and like sporta dn scenary pics, is the 30D better becaise of better depth of field? I am not sure if this is a correct statement or if I misinterpreted it.

Thanks- Ken
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Old Aug 13, 2006, 11:59 PM   #4
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Quote:
I think I read that maybe the pics would not be as good on non cropping with 8x10's and smaller. Something to do with pixel size and density?
I don't think that is true. Density on the 5D is in line with the best current DSLRs and is lower (better) than the 30D. Pixels are theoretically infinitely small. "Pixel pitch" is a measure of density and it probably what you are referring to. The lower density is going to give you less noise with all other things being equal. There is no disadvantage of the camera at smaller print sizes.

Quote:
Also since I will not be taking portraits and like sporta dn scenary pics, is the 30D better becaise of better depth of field? I am not sure if this is a correct statement or if I misinterpreted it.
That is correct. For a given angle of view your DOF will be smaller. Most photographers consider that an advantage in many situations where you want to deemphasize the background by blurring it. But if you want maximum DOF the smaller sensor would be better. For indoor sports the downside of the smaller sensor is you don't do as well at higher ISO.


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