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Old Jul 9, 2018, 9:48 AM   #1
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Default Lock up your mirror

What does 'lock up your mirror' mean?
..... john
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Old Jul 9, 2018, 3:52 PM   #2
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It refers to SLR cameras. The mirror has to move out of the way of the film or sensor in order to make an exposure, and that is automatic when you take the picture, but there is a way to manually lock the mirror in the 'up' position to be able to clean the sensor, or clean and inspect the metering sensors inside the mirror box.
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Old Jul 9, 2018, 5:47 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by Shinnen View Post
What does 'lock up your mirror' mean? ..... john
Hi John
As VT says - these days it's used mostly for sensor cleaning, but back in film camera days it was mostly used for tripod work to minimise shake, &/or with certain specialised lenses that came so deep into the camera body that they would hit the mirror if the mirror was still in its usual place
There were also times when using a motor drive and fast action [eg 10fps sort of thing], that the mirror was locked up and an external eyepiece used in the flash hot shoe for aiming purposes

Hope this helps
Phil
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Old Jul 9, 2018, 6:19 PM   #4
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Right. Well, How is this done? Can I do this with my FX-3. If so, why would I do it? This is not the bulb setting, is it?
... john

Last edited by Shinnen; Jul 9, 2018 at 6:20 PM. Reason: correct punctuation
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Old Jul 9, 2018, 8:16 PM   #5
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Only the top of the line SLRs had the Mirror-Lockup feature, so I doubt that your FX-3 has it.

BTW, you might want to take a look at this, especially the note at the end.
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Old Jul 9, 2018, 8:38 PM   #6
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The mirror lock-up was often used with the bulb setting to prevent camera shake for long exposures, as Phil mentioned. (a feature I remember using only once or twice). My Minolta has a small, slotted button on the side of the lens mount which operates the mirror so that a cable release can be used to hold open the shutter in bulb mode, and keep the shutter open as long as one likes. (don't have to hold it - there's a screw in the side which locks the cable.) It also has a mechanical self-timer on the lower part of the body, operated by a lever.
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Old Jul 9, 2018, 9:31 PM   #7
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Hi TCav,
Yes, I see the note about metering inaccuracy.(I shot a roll of 200, so we'll see how it looks.)
Thanks,
.... john

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Only the top of the line SLRs had the Mirror-Lockup feature, so I doubt that your FX-3 has it.

BTW, you might want to take a look at this, especially the note at the end.

Last edited by Shinnen; Jul 9, 2018 at 9:33 PM. Reason: additional information
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Old Jul 9, 2018, 9:49 PM   #8
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Hi Brian,
"...there's a screw in the side which locks the cable.) It also has a mechanical self-timer on the lower part of the body, operated by a lever." Yes my camera has this lever. It's about a 10 second timer. But I don't see any other indications suggesting mirror lock up capability.
... john
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Old Jul 10, 2018, 9:46 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shinnen View Post
Hi Brian,
"...there's a screw in the side which locks the cable.) It also has a mechanical self-timer on the lower part of the body, operated by a lever." Yes my camera has this lever. It's about a 10 second timer. But I don't see any other indications suggesting mirror lock up capability.
... john
Self-timers routinely raise the mirror out of the light path as soon as you press the shutter release, and then wait the 10 seconds before opening the shutter. That gives the camera time to settle down from the movement before taking the photo. Thus, for all intents and purposes, the self-timer acts as a mirror lockup.
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Old Jul 10, 2018, 11:40 AM   #10
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Hi TCav,
Yes, that appears to be what happens. When I press the shutter button (lens off) the mirror moves out of place, then about 10 seconds later the piece of paper I put in place of film, appears for about 1 second (exposure time), then disappears. I'm sure it sounds like over kill to you, but when you're not sure about what your seeing you have to resort to such methods;-)
.... john

Last edited by Shinnen; Jul 10, 2018 at 11:42 AM. Reason: name correction
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