Steve's Digicams Forums

Steve's Digicams Forums (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/)
-   Nikon dSLR (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/nikon-dslr-57/)
-   -   auto focus trouble d40x (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/nikon-dslr-57/auto-focus-trouble-d40x-140709/)

boofighter May 3, 2008 10:02 AM

high, new to this forum and have done a search but could not find the answer. the problem that i am having or am preciving to have is is with the auto focus of my camera. i would like to use it but it seems not to work. i have the switch set to the auto focus and when i click the shutter nothing happens. i puch the button to the right of the view finder and i can hear the auto focus moving and see the image bluring and then come into focus. then i can take one picture. i have to do this everytime. as soon as i move to manual focus i can take a picture. it is a bit frustrating.
any one have any thoughts or similar experiances. thanks in advance.

JimC May 3, 2008 10:16 AM

boofighter wrote:
Quote:

i puch the button to the right of the view finder and i can hear the auto focus moving and see the image bluring and then come into focus. then i can take one picture. i have to do this everytime. as soon as i move to manual focus i can take a picture. it is a bit frustrating.
You should see the same thing happen when you press the shutter button. You're probably releasing it before the camera achieves focus lock.

Try half pressing the shutter button and waiting for focus confirmation in the viewfinder, then press it the rest of the way down. If the focus can't lock, try find a higher contrast area of the scene with better light to lock on with a half press, then reframe and press the shutter button the rest of the way down.

My guess is that you're testing this in less that optimum lighting (and indoors is low light to a camera). You didn't mention the lens you're using, but most lenses lose light as you zoom in more, too. That means the Autofocus Sensors can't see as well to focus and that slows the camera down, requiring longer to achieve a focus lock in dim lighting. You'll often find a big difference in focus speed between lenses, and some are better suited to low light compared to others.

You can also use Continuous Focus and Continuous Drive modes. Continuous Focus allows the camera to stay locked on a moving subject, with Continuous Drive allowing you to continue to take photos at a rapid frame rate until the shutter is released.
.

boofighter May 3, 2008 10:49 AM

i will try that and let you know how it goes. thanks for the quick reply, and helpful comments.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 8:00 PM.