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-   -   dxo sensor tests are in for the D7000 (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/nikon-dslr-57/dxo-sensor-tests-d7000-179750/)

JohnG Nov 8, 2010 9:43 AM

dxo sensor tests are in for the D7000
 
I started a similar thread last week in Pentax forum as the K-5 sensor test was published. The D7000 sensor test has now been published. Now, plenty of people don't like dxo tests (usually when it says their camera isn't the best imaging device in every category :) ) - but it's one of the few sources that at least attempts to quantify sensor performance for high iso, color depth and dynamic range. The good news is - performance from these new APS-c sensors really does look amazing. Glad to see an emphasis on quality. This is even great news if you're a full-frame shooter as it really pushes manufacturers to make quality gains in full-frame sensor design. And heck, it's great news for those of us who own Canon. So hats off to Sony (who is believed to have made the sensor) and to Nikon for their implementation.

dlpin Nov 8, 2010 12:29 PM

One thing that is striking when comparing the k-5 and d7k results is how consistent they are. People always try to fault DxO methodology in different ways, either mentioning sample variation or something else, and yet they show remarkable stability. This also applies to all the marketing claims made by different manufacturers discussing how they've "optimized" a given sensor, as these tests show that in the end same sensor=same result if you shoot raw.

tclune Nov 8, 2010 12:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dlpin (Post 1164082)
One thing that is striking when comparing the k-5 and d7k results is how consistent they are. People always try to fault DxO methodology in different ways, either mentioning sample variation or something else, and yet they show remarkable stability. This also applies to all the marketing claims made by different manufacturers discussing how they've "optimized" a given sensor, as these tests show that in the end same sensor=same result if you shoot raw.

That is not at all clear to me. My understanding is that the D90 and the D5000 have the same sensor, but the D90 results for dynamic range are better than the D5000 at ISO 3200 and 6400. I have not seen anything that explains the test conditions for DXO enough to be able to make sense of that result. Have you?

dlpin Nov 8, 2010 1:03 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tclune (Post 1164089)
That is not at all clear to me. My understanding is that the D90 and the D5000 have the same sensor, but the D90 results for dynamic range are better than the D5000 at ISO 3200 and 6400. I have not seen anything that explains the test conditions for DXO enough to be able to make sense of that result. Have you?


I wouldn't say those are significant differences. Maybe some undetected smoothing going on, but differences of 1/2 a stop and 3/4s of a stop at extreme ISOs aren't significant enough, especially given the different measure ISOs. Statistical noise is bound to be higher in those levels anyways, and I am not claiming that DxO is accurate at those levels of precision.

But overall, I've yet to see significant differences between the basic measures from the same sensors in different cameras.

Wizzard0003 Nov 8, 2010 3:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JohnG (Post 1164021)
Now, plenty of people don't like dxo tests (usually when it says their camera isn't the best imaging device in every category :) )

HAAA...! Ain't that the truth...! :p

I'd already planned on a D7k sometime early next year (finances permitting)... I've already made up my mind
on a Nikon (of some model) so the DXO scores simply help me feel more comfortable with my choice... ;)

Franko170 Nov 9, 2010 5:11 PM

Ken Rockwell is updating his review on the D7000 today (Tuesday) as this is posted.

http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/d7000.htm


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