Steve's Digicams Forums

Steve's Digicams Forums (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/)
-   Nikon dSLR (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/nikon-dslr-57/)
-   -   First photos (https://forums.steves-digicams.com/nikon-dslr-57/first-photos-157703/)

sueg Jul 23, 2009 6:22 PM

First photos
 
I tried out my D90 today using Auto mode. I think they're OK,but I don't really see as much improvement over my Powershot as I was expecting. These 2 pics were taken outside,& there's a discoloration around Hannahs mouth area that isn't really there & it's not there when I use my Powershot either. Any suggestions? Is there a setting I need to change? Keep in mind,I'm not yet ready for the advanced settings. Just feeling my way around & getting use to the camera. The last photo was taken with my Canon Powershot about 3 weeks ago.

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e1...presized-1.jpg

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e1...cropresize.jpg

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e1...554thflare.jpg

mtclimber Jul 23, 2009 7:50 PM

Sue-

The photos look great for starter photos. My guess about the discoloration around Hannah's mouth is that in the newer photos you were shooting downward. In the last photo you were at eye level with Hannah.

One other item that could be checked is the WB setting. My suggestion is that rather than using the full Auto Mode, that you use the "P" for Programed Auto Mode. That works just like auto, but also allows you to make changes such as ISO speed, WB, Exposure Compensation, Flash Compensation etc

Sarah Joyce

vIZnquest Jul 23, 2009 7:57 PM

Well you show two different settings to show a difference. Well I don't think it is conclusive as you have stated as such. The color off the facial area of your dog is the actual color of the green background reflecting off the dog. Why just the face I am not sure but I can pretty much say that this is what it is.

Try shooting again the same setting as your last shot.

sueg Jul 23, 2009 8:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mtclimber (Post 986602)
Sue-

The photos look grat for starter photos. My guess about the discoloration around Hannah's mouth is that in the newer photos you were shooting downward. In the last photo you were at eye level with Hannah.

One other item that could be checked is the WB setting. My suggestion is that rather than using the full Auto Mode, that you use the "P" for Programed Auto Mode. That works just like auto, but also allows you to make changes such as ISO speed, WB, Exposure Compensation, Flash Compensation etc

Sarah Joyce

Thanks Sarah. I'll try the Program mode next & check the WB. You're right, looks like I wasn't quite at eye level like I thought I was:o. I'll try that same scene again & see if I can do better. Thanks for the suggestions. I've photographed clouds today & flowers also,still have to check those out.

sueg Jul 23, 2009 8:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vIZnquest (Post 986604)
Well you show two different settings to show a difference. Well I don't think it is conclusive as you have stated as such. The color off the facial area of your dog is the actual color of the green background reflecting off the dog. Why just the face I am not sure but I can pretty much say that this is what it is.

Try shooting again the same setting as your last shot.

I only wanted to show that her face was not discolored as the 1st 2 photos make it seem. Sorry,I should have made that clear. I've never had a reflection problem before,but I'll except that as a possible cause. Thanks for your opinion.

ride16 Jul 23, 2009 10:19 PM

I definately think the green in the first two pictures is a color cast from the blanket. To get a good comparison, try taking the same shot in the same place with both cameras. I just got my D90, too (a couple of months ago) and it really does take amazing pictures. I thougt nothing could replace my beloved Panasonic FZ20, which took GREAT pictures, but the D90 blows it out of the water. :D

mtclimber Jul 23, 2009 10:46 PM

Know Where Your DSLR Camera is Focusing
 
1 Attachment(s)
Sue-

I also think that the possibility of a green cast from the blanket could have been a cause of the problem. You will only know for sure when you repose the scene and duplicate the camera angle.

I have an SLR Seminar to do during the next contract, so I was shooting some photos tonight to illustrate how important really knowing where is focusing can make or break a photo.

I kept the Bell Pepper tops when I made the salad tonight. Here is photo #1 it was taken with the Nikon D-40X equipped with the Nikon SB-800 flash. I just let the camera do its thing and purposely set up the Bell Pepper tops behind each other.

Because I gave the camera no specific direction it went ahead and focused on the stem of the Yellow Bell Pepper top. But look what happened to the Red Bell Pepper top. It fell out of focus.

Sarah Joyce

mtclimber Jul 23, 2009 10:48 PM

100% Crop of the Above Posted Photo
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hi Sue-

Here is a 100% crop of the above posted photo. It proves that the Yellow Bell Pepper top was the focus point.

Sarah Joyce

mtclimber Jul 23, 2009 10:52 PM

A 100% Crop of the stem of the Red bell Pepper
 
1 Attachment(s)
OK, Sue-

Here is a 100% crop showing what happened to the Red Bell Pepper top. It is not in focus.

Sarah Joyce

mtclimber Jul 23, 2009 10:58 PM

A Different Result
 
1 Attachment(s)
Ok, another photo for you, Sue-

This photo was taken with the Pentax K-2000 camera equipped with the Pentax AF-360 Flash. In this photo I took the time to position the plate so that the two Bell pepper tops were parallel to each other, so that they would both be in focus.

On purpose, I specifically focused on the stem of the Yellow Bell Pepper. Now please notice how the result is better in this photo than the last photo.

Sarah Joyce

mtclimber Jul 23, 2009 11:00 PM

100% crop of the Yellow Bell Pepper Top
 
1 Attachment(s)
OK, Sue-

Here is a 100% crop of the Yellow Bell Pepper top showing its focus in detail.

Sarah Joyce

mtclimber Jul 23, 2009 11:09 PM

100% Crop of the Red Pepper top
 
1 Attachment(s)
OK, Sue-

Here is the 100% crop of the Red pepper top showing you that because the Bell Pepper tops were set up parallel to each other, the Red bell Pepper top is also now reasonably in focus.

So there are two issues here to learn: (1) how you set up the photo can affect the photo's visual outcome. (2) knowing where your DSLR is focusing is more critical on a DSLR camera than on a point and shoot digicam. The digicam due to it much, much small imager has a lot of depth of field that is inherent to the design of the digcam. On a DSLR camera we have to be a bit more precise.

I hope that might be of help as you start working with your new Nikon D-90 camera.

Sarah Joyce

sueg Jul 24, 2009 12:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ride16 (Post 986639)
I definately think the green in the first two pictures is a color cast from the blanket. To get a good comparison, try taking the same shot in the same place with both cameras. I just got my D90, too (a couple of months ago) and it really does take amazing pictures. I thougt nothing could replace my beloved Panasonic FZ20, which took GREAT pictures, but the D90 blows it out of the water. :D

I'm glad you're loving your D90. I'm probably going through an adjustment period. The simplicity of a P&S & knowing how to get the best out of it is quite different from the learning curve of a DSLR.

Quote:

Originally Posted by mtclimber (Post 986663)
OK, Sue-

Here is the 100% crop of the Red pepper top showing you that because the Bell Pepper tops were set up parallel to each other, the Red bell Pepper top is also now reasonably in focus.

So there are two issues here to learn: (1) how you set up the photo can affect the photo's visual outcome. (2) knowing where your DSLR is focusing is more critical on a DSLR camera than on a point and shoot digicam. The digicam due to it much, much small imager has a lot of depth of field that is inherent to the design of the digcam. On a DSLR camera we have to be a bit more precise.

I hope that might be of help as you start working with your new Nikon D-90 camera.

Sarah Joyce

Thanks for the informative tutorial Sarah. Good to know I need to pay more attention on focus & layout of subject. I will try again tomorrow with that in mind & make a few changes,maybe try the flash,if Hannah will allow it.I'm having to operate the camera one-handed when photographing my dogs. One hand has to keep their attention so they will look in the direction I need.This camera is a bit heavy & it's possible I may be letting it slant downward a bit when I press the shutter. My cloud pictures turned out great & the non-posed photos I took of Hannah without the green backdrop didn't have the discoloration. Thanks for all your help Sarah,I really appreciate it.Hopefully I'll come back after a few days of practice with some better photos. Maybe I will even take a digital photography course.

mtclimber Jul 24, 2009 12:54 AM

Digicam Photo Sample
 
1 Attachment(s)
Last one for the evening Sue-

This photo was taken with the Kodak Z-1012 using the camera's built-in flash. Notice the greater depth of field that puts everything nicely into focus.

Sarah Joyce

mtclimber Jul 24, 2009 12:56 AM

100% Crop of the Above Posted Photo
 
1 Attachment(s)
Sue-

Here is the 100% crop of the above posted photo. All nice and sharp.

sarah Joyce

deadshot Jul 24, 2009 2:51 PM

It's interesting Sarah you saying about the shallower DOF with DSLRs.
If you look at the snails photo that I took on the thread that Sueg started.
" The complete package D5000 " page 4, as Jim Cs version is an improvement on my original. What suprised me was that the heads the snails are eating are out of focus but the shells are not.Allowing for the fact that full out my 18-200 only opens up to F5.6.I was amazed! I was about 2-3ft from the Snails I couldn't get closer so used LV as they were high up.

sueg Jul 24, 2009 3:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mtclimber (Post 986693)
Last one for the evening Sue-

This photo was taken with the Kodak Z-1012 using the camera's built-in flash. Notice the greater depth of field that puts everything nicely into focus.

Sarah Joyce

I think I understand your point Sarah. Now I just have to remember it when I'm setting up for my shot. It was easier with my little P&S. I'm thinking I will eventually get the superb quality of photos,but not by doing it the P&S way I'm accustomed to. I did some experimenting today with the same settup. The discoloration is indeed the reflection from the green backdrop. It wasn't as bad with my P&S,but it was there.The shots I took without the green backdrop had no discoloration. I couldn't get the flash to work outside in the bright light,no matter what I tried.None of my outdoor shots today were good quality. So I moved my setting inside,near a natural light source & turned on the redeye reduction. The photos showed a great improvement & no green reflection. I'm going to assume I need to purchase an external flash to use outside. Here's one of the photos I took today,same backdrop,but indoors with flash.

http://i36.photobucket.com/albums/e1...ah3495crop.jpg

mtclimber Jul 24, 2009 3:27 PM

Deadshot-

The very selective focus of a DSLR equipped with a lens like the Nikon 18-200mm VR lens is something that is overlooked by more than a few DSLR users.

Sarah Joyce

mtclimber Jul 24, 2009 3:32 PM

Hi Sue-

You got a much improved photo from today's shooting of Hannah. The the focus was right where you wanted it.

I think you hit on the primary point of my examples: you are going to have to modify some of your shooting and photo techniques when you move from a point and shoot camera to a DSLR camera. They are decidedly different camera types.

Yes, at least for my style of shooting, I consider an external flash is a must. I own the SB-400, the SB-600, and the SB-800 flashes. With the high ISO capability of your D-90, you could probably get by with the little SB-400. It does not swivel, but it does have full tilt capability. The SB-400 is small and very handy. I like it a lot and use it often. That would let you get into an external flash at the $(US) 110.00 price range. The SB-600 will be more than twice that price. The SB-600 is the midsize flash in the group and a very good flash.

Sarah Joyce

smac Jul 24, 2009 4:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deadshot (Post 986827)
It's interesting Sarah you saying about the shallower DOF with DSLRs.
If you look at the snails photo that I took on the thread that Sueg started.
" The complete package D5000 " page 4, as Jim Cs version is an improvement on my original. What suprised me was that the heads the snails are eating are out of focus but the shells are not.Allowing for the fact that full out my 18-200 only opens up to F5.6.I was amazed! I was about 2-3ft from the Snails I couldn't get closer so used LV as they were high up.


Your shot looks really good.

As for your flash problem. Were you still in Auto Mode? I have had the same problem until I realized that I was shooting in Auto mode (Which I almost never do anymore) As soon as you which to P (program) A(Aperture) S(shutter) or M(manual) you should have full control of your flash.
I just went outside in full blazing sun and fired off two shots of my hand. One with the flash popped up in P mode and one with the flash down in P mode. I was trying to eliminate the shadows in my hand. The flash fired and mission accomplished.
Try your outdoor shots in any mode other than Auto and the flash should fire. The shots below were taken with a D40 but it works exactly the same for my D80 and D300 too.
Cheers,
Steve

Here are the two shots. 1st, P mode Flash extended.

http://scienceguy.smugmug.com/photos...20_GYXrZ-M.jpg

2nd P mode flash down.

http://scienceguy.smugmug.com/photos...26_omMfJ-M.jpg

sueg Jul 24, 2009 6:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mtclimber (Post 986834)
Hi Sue-

You got a much improved photo from today's shooting of Hannah. The the focus was right where you wanted it.

I think you hit on the primary point of my examples: you are going to have to modify some of your shooting and photo techniques when you move from a point and shoot camera to a DSLR camera. They are decidedly different camera types.

Yes, at least for my style of shooting, I consider an external flash is a must. I own the SB-400, the SB-600, and the SB-800 flashes. With the high ISO capability of your D-90, you could probably get by with the little SB-400. It does not swivel, but it does have full tilt capability. The SB-400 is small and very handy. I like it a lot and use it often. That would let you get into an external flash at the $(US) 110.00 price range. The SB-600 will be more than twice that price. The SB-600 is the midsize flash in the group and a very good flash.

Sarah Joyce

Yes,I paid more attention this time & moved the props inward & focused in on her nose area instead of her chest area. As you said,DSLRs are different than P&S. Thanks for the info on the external Flash.I will check on them soon.

Quote:

Originally Posted by smac (Post 986843)
Your shot looks really good.

As for your flash problem. Were you still in Auto Mode? I have had the same problem until I realized that I was shooting in Auto mode (Which I almost never do anymore) As soon as you which to P (program) A(Aperture) S(shutter) or M(manual) you should have full control of your flash.
I just went outside in full blazing sun and fired off two shots of my hand. One with the flash popped up in P mode and one with the flash down in P mode. I was trying to eliminate the shadows in my hand. The flash fired and mission accomplished.
Try your outdoor shots in any mode other than Auto and the flash should fire. The shots below were taken with a D40 but it works exactly the same for my D80 and D300 too.
Cheers,
Steve

Here are the two shots. 1st, P mode Flash extended.

http://scienceguy.smugmug.com/photos...20_GYXrZ-M.jpg

2nd P mode flash down.

http://scienceguy.smugmug.com/photos...26_omMfJ-M.jpg

Thanks. Yes,I was mostly using Auto mode & Portrait mode,but I tried all of the preset modes & the flash wouldn't come on. I haven't tried the Program mode yet. I'm planning on doing that soon. Worked great for your hand,so I definitely need to experiment with that.

smac Jul 24, 2009 6:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sueg (Post 986861)
Thanks. Yes,I was mostly using Auto mode & Portrait mode,but I tried all of the preset modes & the flash wouldn't come on. I haven't tried the Program mode yet. I'm planning on doing that soon. Worked great for your hand,so I definitely need to experiment with that.


LOL, yes, I do have a photogenic hand don't I ;).

Seriously, once you set you camera on P you can easily change the f/stop by rotating the back scroll wheel and the shutter speed will automatically change to maintain the proper exposure. Then, if you feel you need it, you can pop up the flash for fill light. It's pretty cool.
Good luck and have fun discovering your new friend.
BTW, like you, I moved up from my beloved FZ20 to DSLR about 4yrs ago. What a great camera that was. You won't regret your choice.

Cheers,
Steve

RichardK Jul 26, 2009 9:21 AM

Dog
 
The Pictures are Great, did you perhaps use a Prog(photoshop) on the 3rd?? Just asking.
Richard

sueg Jul 26, 2009 1:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RichardK (Post 987218)
The Pictures are Great, did you perhaps use a Prog(photoshop) on the 3rd?? Just asking.
Richard

Thanks,I don't have Photoshop:o. I used a lightweight photo editor to frame,crop,resize & add the lens flare to the little flag twirler & remove a part of a fence from the background. No other editing was done.

sueg Jul 27, 2009 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smac (Post 986867)
LOL, yes, I do have a photogenic hand don't I ;).

Seriously, once you set you camera on P you can easily change the f/stop by rotating the back scroll wheel and the shutter speed will automatically change to maintain the proper exposure. Then, if you feel you need it, you can pop up the flash for fill light. It's pretty cool.
Good luck and have fun discovering your new friend.
BTW, like you, I moved up from my beloved FZ20 to DSLR about 4yrs ago. What a great camera that was. You won't regret your choice.

Cheers,
Steve

Just wanted to let you & Sarah know that I experimented with the program mode & flash & it worked. Same lime green backdrop outside was used as original setup & the photos looked much much better with no greenish reflection on her face. :) Thanks for helping me find an easy solution for my problem.

mtclimber Jul 27, 2009 6:24 PM

Sue-

I am delighted to hear that the latest photos of Hannah turned out just fine.

Sarah Joyce


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 7:31 PM.