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Old Mar 27, 2007, 11:19 AM   #11
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Thanks a lot! Your hint and the article you linked to have been extremely useful to me.

I just bought a Nikon D50 and was going to ask around about whether the EN-EL3s suffer from the memory effect and such, but your post explained everything. Thanks again.

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Old Mar 29, 2007, 5:08 AM   #12
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tommysdad wrote:
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Read what Ken Rockwell has to say about charging Lithium Ion Batteries

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/battery-life.htm

I have a battery grip on my D200, I charge the depleted battery after a days shoot (not fully discharged) and swap the batteries around so as to get even useage.

TD
I have a grip on my D80 which has the 2 batteries in it. Of course it uses only one battery at a time -most likely just like your D200... Now, if I take out the used battery and charge it, the D80 automatically swaps over to the other battery and starts using it, even after I put the freshly charged battery back in. Only when I take out the second battery and charge it, will the D80 again start using the remaining battery... There is no need to swap batteries around in the grip, as it is done automatically, well at least it is in the D80... Go into the menu and check your battery status after you charge any one of your batteries. It MIGHT give battery 1 and 2 (or A and B) charge status and you may find it also swaps them over for you, just like mine AND if you are swapping them around manually, you may end up using the same battery all the time - see what I mean..!!!
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Old Mar 29, 2007, 6:11 AM   #13
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Quote:
I have a grip on my D80 which has the 2 batteries in it. Of course it uses only one battery at a time - most likely just like your D200... Now, if I take out the used battery and charge it, the D80 automatically swaps over to the other battery and starts using it, even after I put the freshly charged battery back in. Only when I take out the second battery and charge it, will the D80 again start using the remaining battery... There is no need to swap batteries around in the grip, as it is done automatically, well at least it is in the D80... Go into the menu and check your battery status after you charge any one of your batteries. It MIGHT give battery 1 and 2 (or A and B) charge status and you may find it also swaps them over for you, just like mine AND if you are swapping them around manually, you may end up using the same battery all the time - see what I mean..!!!

I use the manually swapping method for my own peace of mind that both batteries are being used evenly.I do understand what you are saying though.


TD
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Old Mar 29, 2007, 7:54 AM   #14
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MisterNeil,

I asked some questions about rechargeable batteries in theBatteries and Power Packsforum and got a lot of informative responses. The thread can be reached hear

http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/v...mp;forum_id=51
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Old Mar 30, 2007, 1:56 AM   #15
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I haven't yet viewed that thread but I have been using rechargeables - NiCd,, NiMH and Lith Ion, well, since they each appeared, and it appears that many "experts" are self appointed experts. Although I can't say I have ever found the optimum way to charge any of them, you kind of end up finding the way(s) NOT to charge them. I have had NiCd's come back from the dead after they refused to holda usable charge for more than a quarter of the original time and after they have been left for years on end without touching them. I once VERY briefly connected a handful of them across a 12 volt car battery by JUST touching the wires on the car battery terminals causing a few sparks but after thatthey charged up and held their charge for almost as good as when they were new... Remember that cute 600maH that used to be the only one you could get... Hahaha..!!!

I never really got to know any particular NiMH's because as soon as once capacity came out, another higher capacity appeared and when things finally settled on about 2500ah, I had quite a few corroding and leaking on me but the best ones I ever had were both 1800 and 2500maH Energizers which were only sold with a charger at a local supermarket at the time. Now they are everywhere and dirt cheap. Both sizes last foreverin my Finepix S6000 and there's no real noticable difference in performance or life between them, even though one is more than 35% larger capacitythan the other. These guys seem to take whatever charge I throw at them as well,, slow (14hrs), fast (5hrs), lightning fast (2-3hrs), makes no difference, they appear to be great batteries,, so it may be 'quality vs quantity'where make/capacity/brand are important,, ratherthan purely just the capacity. VERY versatile batteries indeed...

With Lithium Ion batteries the only thing I have heard about them is that they don't need to be run down before charging and indeed, you shouldn't actually flatten them at all. Charge them whenever you feel like it BUT they appear to perform to their optimum when cycled at least once a month. What is a "cycle"?? It doesn't mean used until flat in one hit.. It means you can use them a little here, a little there, as long as you use it to what would be equal to a level where you could have said they would be flat... Once again, charge them however many time in this "cycling" you feel like... USE a charger designed for them though...!!!
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Old Apr 2, 2007, 5:47 AM   #16
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Darrell1 wrote:
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LI batteries do not have the memory problem, and you can normally charge them when ever you like (the first few cycles, it is a good idea to run them down).

HOWEVER, the charger that comes with the D70 is not very good. It does not monitor the charge to the battery - it only works as a timer. Therefor, that charger can fry your battery because it is treating your battery as if it were fully depleted.

Darrell
Not true, the Nikon D70 battery charger senses battery voltage, and charge current. If you want to verify this, fully charge a battery (light stops blinking), remove it, and place it back into the charger to see how long the light blinks again.....
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