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Old Sep 23, 2006, 4:02 PM   #1
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I have a question. What should I set my D50 to to get the best shot? I'm shooting pictures of a pastor inside aworship centerwith low lighting. I'm shooting without flash because I don't want people getting mad at me for using the flash during the service. Whenever I take a picture in the worship center, (without flash) they come outkind of yellow and blurry. What should my D50 be set to to get the best picture? By the way, below is a picture that I took in the worship center. It is terrible.

-TheCartoonist
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Old Sep 23, 2006, 4:36 PM   #2
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Looking at the handle of the guitar, at the Pastor's pants leg just above his shoe, & at several other things in the picture, I think that the camera moved during the exposure - I take it that it was not held absolutely still as it would be if it had been mounted it on a good, strong tripod. Also, the camera probably shot the picture at a rather slow shutter speed and at a low ISO setting (which make hand-held camera shots even more difficult.

I can't judge what caused the unsatisfactory color of the picture, but my guess is that the camera was used at a setting for outdoor daylight and not warm, tungsten indoor lighting.
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Old Sep 23, 2006, 10:19 PM   #3
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Ok, pic was shot at f/4, 1/5", 55mm and ISO 800.

There is obvious camera shake on this. Basically, there was not enough light to shoot this. ISO was bumped (assuming auto-ISO) and shutter speed was slowed. A tripod (or toher support) would certainly fix the non-moving subjects, but if the speaker is moving too fast, he still wouldn't be sharply focused.

The ISO could also be bump to 1600, but again, that's not a guarantee that the speaker will be sharply focused. The only way to get the speaker sharp is to bump shutter speed, but that would make everything darker. Maybe for this situation, there just wasn't enough light.

The light looks a little warm, but that's what I would expect. When shots are exposed longer, the lighting tends to come out warmer.

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Old Sep 23, 2006, 11:47 PM   #4
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As rey mentioned, your shutter speeds are too slow. That's where the blur is coming from (blur from camera shake and subject movement).

Is the lighting pretty constant, or is is dimmed and brightened during the service?

If constant, you may want to consider going manual exposure and seeing what you get at around 1/20 second, f/4 and ISO 1600 (using your histogram as a guide to how your settings are working).

That would put your exposure at a stop under (darker) compared to where you were at for that shot, and it would increase noise levels. But, judging from what I see, that would probably work much better (some areas of that photo look overexposed to me, with the color cast from the WB settings masking it some). Something about the scene is probably fooling your metering some.

Shutter speeds would still be pretty slow shooting at 1/20 second. But, you'd have a much better percentage of keepers with less blur at 1/20 second versus 1/5 or 1/10 second.

A tripod would be a good idea to help with blur from camera shake. You'll still get a bit of blur from subject movement at 1/20 second. Take more photos to increase your number of keepers and be careful about smoothly squeezing the shutter button. Taking photos in bursts can help, too.

I'd probably go incandescent (tungsten) with the White Balance (or use a custom white balance instead).

If you've got memory card space, shoot in raw. Raw will give you a bit more leeway for post processing (especially if your exposure and white balance are off). Then, use noise reduction tools if necessary (depending on viewing sizes needed).

If you've got a spare $100, you may want to get yourself a brighter 50mm f/1.8 AF lens for low light shots like this.

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Old Sep 24, 2006, 12:45 AM   #5
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"If you've got a spare $100, you may want to get yourself a brighter 50mm f/1.8 AF lens for low light shots like this."


SIGNED, If you really want decent shutter speeds in low lighting like this, you need a wider apperature, the Kit lens isn't very good for that.

plus the 50mm f1.8 is an awesome lens for dirt cheap, so its worth picking up almost regardless
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Old Sep 24, 2006, 11:35 PM   #6
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Hey guys,

Just a quick update...when I shot that picture, I was in "AUTO" mode, (Not "A" mode). Though,I tried shooting some pictures again today in the service.I took everyone's advice.They came out nice. Much much clearer. (I used a tri-pod too. No more blurry pictures.)I will post some of the pictures on here and the stats of the pictures in a little bit. God bless!

-TheCartoonist
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Old Sep 25, 2006, 1:39 PM   #7
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Before...


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Old Sep 25, 2006, 1:40 PM   #8
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Old Sep 25, 2006, 2:09 PM   #9
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No after, huh?

You'll probably need to downsize it to something a bit smaller if you're trying to use the browse button at the bottom of the post entry screen to attach an image to your post. The only reason the first one got through at that size is that is was so blurry that it compressed well and was under 200KB. ;-)

See the Annoucment Post From Steve titled How to post your photos (second "Sticky" post in the threads list for the General Q&A Forum)

I'd probably resize it around 700 pixels wide. That seems to work fine on most monitor resolutions without a viewer needing to scroll right and left to see text in the posts.

Then, make sure the jpeg quality isn't too high (around 85% towards the high end of a jpeg quality slider is usually a good compromise at that image size).

You'll want the posted file size to be around 200KB or smaller (no more than about 240KB or the forums software won't allow it).

If you need something to resize it with, try Irfanview (free). I'd download the free plugins, too. You can resize it using Image>Resize/Resample.

After resizing to around 700 pixels wide, just use the File>Save as option to save it, giving it a new name (leaving the check boxes checked for leaving the EXIF info in the image), and moviing the JPEG Quality slider to around 80 or 85 to keep the file size within forum software limits for an image of that size.

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Old Sep 25, 2006, 9:57 PM   #10
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....I'm trying to resize it...
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