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Old Oct 11, 2006, 8:12 PM   #1
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I was just curious when I see that Olympus and Pentax offers all weather P&S cameras under $200. Why can't Nikon offer this cheap technology on all their dSLR cameras, after all dSLRs must have upper hand than P&S cameras. These weather sealed dSLRs may start a new race like Image Stabilization and Automatic Dust Removal.
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Old Oct 12, 2006, 1:25 PM   #2
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A nice thought but you should put more thought into your questioning! "Weather proof" is like talking about "water resistant" watches in that they will not be ruined by a couple of drops of water but can't be subjected to severe weather. Now "waterproof watches" are different and have the depth markings on them if they are a decent make (my Breitling is 3,000 ft resistant but I don't get that deep in the shower these days!)

A DSLR, unlike a watch, has removable bits called lenses and so the seal around this is always going to be subject to a possibility of water ingress unless you go the lengths of a Nikonos housing which is watertight. The upper range of Nikon DSLR's are for pro/semi pro usage and so must expect rough and tough treatment whereas the lower range (D80/50 for example) are consumer range cameras built down to a price and not up to a standard, hence the difference in the manufacture and the description at point of sale. Particularly the latter since in this litigiousworld no doubt someone would try immersing their "watertight" camera in a barrel of water for days and then sue Nikon if it let a drop in!

You need only to look at a few of my camera bodies to know exactly what they have been through over the years including my current D2X. They go everywhere, are expected to perform whatever the conditions and I have to say that I have never ever had a Nikon break down on me whatever the weather or usage they have been subjected to. That goes for my lenses too which despite having been (in some cases) dropped, banged, and subjected to no matter what weather perform immaculately without ever having had a problem and that over a 25 year period of Nikon and Nikkor usage.

So, if you want a camera that is "watertight" go up range but I have to say that no matter what my Nikons have never caused me one moments worry despite their apparent lack of sealing. Anyway, what's wrong with putting a clear plastic bag over the body with a hole cut out for the lens?
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Old Oct 12, 2006, 4:20 PM   #3
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And some of us are smart enough to know when to come in out of the rain :blah:


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Old Oct 12, 2006, 8:22 PM   #4
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steve wrote:
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And some of us are smart enough to know when to come in out of the rain :blah:


Funny Cartoon for sure.
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Old Oct 12, 2006, 8:26 PM   #5
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Thanks for your comments cameranserai.

I was thinking if D50 and D80 can bear a little of water splashes why can't Nikon add it in their marketing ploys. I know some people who take their D50 in light rain and are happy with their performance. Just how Olympus and Pentax do it with thier cheap P&S cameras, which are effective to splashes of water only and not intended to use underwater.

What is your experience with dust in deserts or beaches.
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Old Oct 13, 2006, 2:51 AM   #6
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Once again you are entering dangerous ground. Nikon cannot advertise "splash resistant" because what constitutes a splash? A couple of drops or a tsunami? They would leave themselves open to law suits everywhere so, like all things these days, it is best to make a good product and leave things to people's common sense if they still have any.

As regards my own Nikons, the F90X went round the world through sea and sand with never a problem, the F70 did the same but I had a lot of dust problems; my own fault I'd say since changing lenses in arid conditions is not to be advised where possible. However, getting back to your original theme, the D2X has not as yet (touch wood) had a dust problem in over a year so far and it has been around a bit too. Perhaps it was changing the lenses or worse sealing on the D70, I don't know but knowing Nikons as I do I prefer to think it was me.

Several weeks back I was at a motor racing meeting in pouring rain and the D2X worked fine without a problem even though I had no shelter and the camera got very wet. This weekend I shall be trackside for the german DTM series cars. I expect, as always, that my Nikons will perform faultlessly.
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Old Oct 13, 2006, 3:38 AM   #7
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There are international standards for defining resistance to ingress of water and dust (IPxxx ratings) so I don't think a definition would be a problem. Olympus claim IPX1 for the E1.

Keith.

cameranserai wrote:
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Once again you are entering dangerous ground. Nikon cannot advertise "splash resistant" because what constitutes a splash? A couple of drops or a tsunami? They would leave themselves open to law suits everywhere so, like all things these days, it is best to make a good product and leave things to people's common sense if they still have any.
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Old Oct 13, 2006, 3:41 AM   #8
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Old Oct 15, 2006, 11:27 AM   #9
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asim24 wrote:
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I was just curious when I see that Olympus and Pentax offers all weather P&S cameras under $200. Why can't Nikon offer this cheap technology on all their dSLR cameras, after all dSLRs must have upper hand than P&S cameras. These weather sealed dSLRs may start a new race like Image Stabilization and Automatic Dust Removal.
Nikon does offer more weather proof DSLR's....the higher end pro bodies. Even those aren't waterproof. As was mentioned the removable lens makes it nearly impossible to seal out all water. Those who really need waterproof, will get the very expensive underwater housings. Extra seals and gaskets add considerably to the cost, and price is as much a feature in lower end cameras.
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