Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Oct 28, 2006, 10:23 AM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 44
Default

A friend of mine just bought the Nikon 70s. She is use to looking at the LCD prior to taking a picture. Now, she has to look through the viewfinder, take the picture and then review it. Is there anyway of setting the camera so that the LCD is on all the time? I tried researching it on the internet and had no luck in finding out anything.

Thanks! :-)
Sunny is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Oct 28, 2006, 6:53 PM   #2
Senior Member
 
Bob Nichol's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: Eastern Ontario Canada
Posts: 822
Default

The LCD on the D70s, not to mention any other DSLR except one, only works in review mode after the picture it taken. There are many posts on this topic but it comes down to the fact that the sensor only works while a photo is being taken primarily because the mirror is in the way when viewing and secondly because the DSLR sensors don't support live feed to an LCD. Even the one exception, an Olympus, uses an auxilliary sensor for limited live feed to the LCD.
Bob Nichol is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Oct 28, 2006, 7:52 PM   #3
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

Even if you could frame using the LCD, the size and weight of a DSLR would make it very difficult to get sharp pictures due to camera shake. It would be almost impossible to keep you're hands steady enough to achieve acceptable results.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 1, 2006, 1:47 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 44
Default

Thank you both for replying. I did find one article and forwarded it to my friend along with both of your responses.She wanted to thank you both for your help. This is her first digital DSLR and seems to really enjoy it. As for her husband - he will eventually get use to it as it is all very new to him.

Thanks again!:-)
Sunny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 2, 2006, 6:56 AM   #5
Senior Member
 
BenjaminXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 788
Default

Code:
Even if you could frame using the LCD, the size and weight of a DSLR would make it very difficult to get sharp pictures due to camera shake. It would be almost impossible to keep you're hands steady enough to achieve acceptable results.
Actually I disagree with that rjseeney,

I have been shooting with my compact digital camera with live preview 3.0" LCD. Personally, the large LCD doesn't give me any significant advantages...the camera is also rather small and lightweight in relative to pro-sumers, and especially dSLR cameras!My compact digital camera is really pron-ed to handshake! You need to shoot with it to know how it feels like! I have used larger digital cameras before, and what a world of difference! Less handshake, movements, and vibrations!! I have also been shooting with the old Minolta pro-sumer, and I certainly find it a lot steadier than my compact! On top of all that, I have still managed to capture many clearlow light shots with that compact digital camera of mine!! I have also managed to capture many clean shots with it in general! (Besides it being more pron-ed to handshake!!)

So I have to disagree that larger & heavier cameras (with live previews) would be difficult to get clear pictures because of camera shake. I also have to totally disagree that it would be almost impossible to keep my hand(s) steady enough to achieve acceptable results! (Especially on such a camera!) Because? I have got many many results even with my compact camera! (That is more pron-ed to handshake!)
BenjaminXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 2, 2006, 8:09 AM   #6
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

Ben,

Perhaps you just have rock steady hands!! I would agree that it may be possible at shorter focal lengths to get ok results especially in bright light with faster shutter speeds. But at moderate tele, I know from experience it would be very difficult. Read any basic photography book, and it will describe proper shooting technique and why its important. It's tough enough to get consistent results at longer focal lengths even using proper technique (remember the 1/focal length rule)because of the narrow field of view. that's why most, if not allpros use a tripod at tele lengths. Do a test for yourself and see using your p&s. Zoom all the way in take5-10 pics of a detailed object handheld...a brick wall will do. Then take the same pictures using a tripod. When you compare, I guarentee you'll get more keepers with the tripod than handheld. Do the same test framing and shooting with your arms extended and you'll get less keepers. Sure you may be able to get a couple decent shots, but some shots you only get one or two chances at. I wouldn't risk losing those shots by using poor technique.

A large camera does provide an advantage especially when using larger lenses, but only when using proper technique. But try framing pictures with your arms extended for an all day shooting session, or even a few hours. Fatigue will set in, and your results will get worse and worse. Think about, could you hold a 1 pound weight steadier using an extended arm for 2 hours, or a 5 pound weight. Using your theory, we could just make cameras bigger and bigger and virtually eliminate camera shake. We could completely forego IS or VR and just make bigger cameras.




rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 2, 2006, 8:45 AM   #7
Senior Member
 
BenjaminXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 788
Default

Iwas not trying to say that we must all make bigger cameras to get more steady shots...I only said that a bigger camera from experience is generally more steadier compared to an ultra compact! (I have both types of camera)

I really do not know about other people's hands...but I know that I can keep even my compact camera steady and get normal shootouts in normal lighting conditions; a larger camera was certainly a level more steady from my experience (In the same lighting conditions).

As lighting situations gets dimmer and you don't have a tripod...I generally found out that my compact camera gets terribly hard to keep steady; I found out that my largercamera was a levelmore steady to handle. (I can see easilyhow steady or shaky my hands are with the live preview LCD)

I noticed that cameras withgood grips areeven better! (Imagine my flat and smooth compact camera!!) Regardless of the "very pron-ed to handshake" factor of my compact, I had stillmanaged to get inplenty of great & non blurred outshots with it!

I ofcouse agree with you that zooming in encourages handshake!! However, I have gotten many non blurred out shots with a mega-zoom at full 10X optical zoom before! Ofcouse, there are always blurred out shots, but there were fantastic nevertheless bringing into the fact that I more or less ALWAYS get in blurred out shots just at 3X optical zoom; with my compact camera!!! Obviously,I find thatmy dad's ultra zoom (Non IS model) can more easily be kept steady at those optical zoom values below the max 10X. (Compared to my damn shaky compact, that already gets uncomfortably shaky at it's max 3X optical zoom!!!)
BenjaminXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 2, 2006, 9:02 AM   #8
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

Using proper technique is just as important as camera size. You could further minimize camera shake in smaller P&S cameras by using the optical viewfinder (if one is available). I'm convinced many of "non sharp", "blurry" pic problems you see mentioned in other forums are a result of using the LCD with the camera held away from the face to frame rather than the optical viewfinder. There's no denying placing the camera up to your face provides another imprtant steadying point. There are some situations where it is nice to use the lcd to frame (macro shots come to mind, but then your using a tripod to steady the camera anyway), but these nice large lcds have led to the proliferation of bad technique.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 2, 2006, 9:28 AM   #9
Senior Member
 
BenjaminXYZ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 788
Default

I don't believe that a tripod can be set up during most macro sessions. Most of the macros that I have ever achieved in the past will be almost impossible to set up a tripod with...most haveinvolved awkward positioning of the camera, required me to hold the camera at awkward angles, and sometimes pointing directly up sky wards with tons of thorns below...no tripod could have been set up during those moments.

I do not know what is good or bad techniques, but when I frame with my compact's large 3.0" LCD, I will always make sure that I can keep steady and get in a clean shot (Based on the situation). Iwill just keep my mindconcerned about the final photograph, and how it should look like. Obviously, I don't thinkthat I would evenbe able to reach those stages yet if I don't even have the ability to hold the camera properly in the first place! :lol:


BenjaminXYZ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Nov 2, 2006, 9:44 AM   #10
Senior Member
 
rjseeney's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Taylor Mill, Kentucky
Posts: 2,398
Default

Tripods are important for macros because DOF becomes so shallow at close focusing distances...we're talking fractions of an inch (millimeters for those using the metric system), and even just breathing will change the focal point. Without a tripod, it's extremely difficult to maintain focus whre you want it. Sure occassionally you may want to try different frames or perspective that may make using a tripod difficult, but unfortunately your wrong when you say tripods cannot be used for most macro work. Most working pros and serious amateurs would consider them a requirement. Ask around in the forums, and you will find this to be the prevailing thought.
rjseeney is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:13 AM.