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Old Jan 31, 2007, 11:23 AM   #11
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Exposure compensation and metering concerns have been around forever. I have seen people complain in various forums about metering for nearly every camera out there. Most of these concerns are voiced very early until the photographers begin to adjust. The D80 caused such a stir because it was a departure from how previous DSLRs metered. The D50 and D200 casued less of a stir because they exposed similiarily to the D70. As I said before the d70 caused many complaints as well, because it was different from most had experienced with previous SLR camera. The D80 is much closer to what I experienced with nikon SLR cameras (the n80 and F100). I think you'll find these concerns and criticisms will decrease over time, and disappear once a new camera is released. Then everyone will focus on percieved problems and wonder why nikon didn't do it like they did with the d80.
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Old Jan 31, 2007, 12:09 PM   #12
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rjseeney wrote:
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Exposure compensation and metering concerns have been around forever. I have seen people complain in various forums about metering for nearly every camera out there. Most of these concerns are voiced very early until the photographers begin to adjust. The D80 caused such a stir because it was a departure from how previous DSLRs metered. The D50 and D200 casued less of a stir because they exposed similiarily to the D70. As I said before the d70 caused many complaints as well, because it was different from most had experienced with previous SLR camera. The D80 is much closer to what I experienced with nikon SLR cameras (the n80 and F100). I think you'll find these concerns and criticisms will decrease over time, and disappear once a new camera is released. Then everyone will focus on percieved problems and wonder why nikon didn't do it like they did with the d80.
Perhaps you're right and that certain photographers just need to "adjust" (shrugs). But obviously there are those few that do feel that this is a "problem" more than something they need to get used to. Are they wrong in believing so? Shrug...

Other threads do say that you only see this under high contrast situations. That this doesn't happen often. And to just dial in a little EV compensation when needed.

I suppose this just just the nature of the game. Will I still consider the D80? Will I end up with the D200? Jump ship? Stay tuned... :-)

Thanks. On to other things...


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Old Jan 31, 2007, 1:39 PM   #13
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I agree with rjseeney, each camera does have their own quirks that user have to deal with. I have the D50, and I shoot usually landscapes, so I use Aperture Priority about 85% of the time, and my camera is always set to at "least" +.3 compensation. This is because the D50 tend to under expose. In sunny days, here in California, I would go as high as +.7 or +1.0 as a *starting point*. There is nothing wrong with using compensation, in fact, I'd go as far as saying it's the reason why people buy SLR and DSLR.

I guess the reason people were surprised with the D80's metering is because it's different from other Nikon DSLRs. But that's a behavior you see early on, when you first use the camera, and then you know what to do afterwards. I really don't see what the big deal is.

DarkDTSHD, I know you're doing your research. But when you get your DSLR, I hope you don't expect the camera to get the right shots for you without you compensating for the shots.

Regarding the "eagle shot". I don't know what time of day it was taken, but it does look over exposed. But I'm thiking that even if it's not, it looks like there is a very big contrast difference between the white head area, and the darker brown body, that you'll lose detail on one or the other. The best eagle shots I've seen are usually taken during the "golden hour" when the white part of the eagle's head has a warmer color and the contrast difference between the whitish head and the brown body are not as wide. Also, the shot looks un-naturally saturated and sharpened too much.




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Old Jan 31, 2007, 9:10 PM   #14
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Thanks for the comments about my eagle pic.I probably didn't choose the best one to post, but it is an example of how a camera like this can frustrate someone like me. With my Coolpix 8800, I've never bothered much shooting in any other mode than full auto. It's provided me with some excellent shots for 2 years...especially close ups of flowers. WhenI got the D80, several people urged me to ignore the preset shooting modes and try P, S and A. I've changed settings many times and now my pics have turned out, as was pointed out, over sharpened and too vivid. I know some folks enjoy all the ISO, bokeh (?) etc stuff, but I just want a decent shot. I know there is a learning curve, but when I'm out, half frozen, with my dogs barking up at an eagle in a tree,I don't want to pause to think whether the exposure will highlight the head feathers. Years ago this was addressed by film latitude. I started developing B and W in 1969, went to a Photo Arts school after high school and developed colour prints and slides in what seems like dinosaur times now. I'm just not sure these new cameras are glitch free when released. Maybe I expect too much, but I understand the basic physics, but don't want a thousand menus to get a good shot.

Comments invited, but hold off on The Nasties. I've been burned by saying how I feel in the past. I enjoy advice and enjoy seeing other's pictures and hearing of problems....and how to resolve them.

Regards, Steve
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Old Jan 31, 2007, 10:02 PM   #15
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Steve,

Sorry if my comment sounded too negative. I didn't mean it that way. What I was trying to say is that in general it is hard to capture an eagle like this because the contrast between the light-colored head and the darker body is just hard for the camera to capture. It is more about the limitation of the dynamic range of the camera than anything else. I found that eagles that were shot around the "magic-hour" tend to have less contrast between the lighter color and the darker color, and therefore tend to come our better.

Regarding the saturation. I find that it's best to do selective saturation and selective sharpening. What I normally do is I select the skies in photoshop, since they are usually the same color, and then I reverse the selection so that the foreground subjects are selected. I then add saturation and sharpness to it, or whatever adjustment is needed. That way, the sky is not affected. Another thing I do, since my monitors are not calibrated, is I make sure the room where I'm editing my pics is a little dark, so that my eyes are not fooled into thinking that the pics need more saturation.

thanks.
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Old Feb 1, 2007, 2:23 PM   #16
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Hi rey ! I actually really appreciated your thoughts. My frustration only applies to the camera. I obviously need some help andvalue your time spent enlightening me. I tried for some more eagle shots this morning, but the winter sun is very white and bright and, as usual, any plummage that'slight appears as just a white mass. I shot a blue heron that now has a whitish head ! I see your point about the afternoon light. I do wonder what shutter and aperture I'd end up with in even lower light than I have in the morning. I bought the 70-300 VR lens hoping to be tripod free, but perhaps I was foolish. I'm also not quite sure the lens is very sharp at 300mm, so there's another thing that frustrates me a bit. My wife bought me a memory card reader for the D80 and it only has the one port. I now find out my Coolpix 8800 has a different card, although my P4 has the same !

I'm just not sure how to set the camera up, so any thoughts are welcome.

Thanks, Steve
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Old Feb 6, 2007, 10:50 PM   #17
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Scubbler, while you learn to use the camera and all of it's settings, try using the auto mode. The D80 will act as a point and shoot. For wildlife shots in very strong light situations you might want to use the Sport setting.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"Or for a nice blurred background, use the Portrait mode.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"This will build up your confidence level with the camera, and you'll feel muchbetter and leave the experimenting for later.

And BTW, the 70-300VR is an excellent lens. Just have to understand how the VR works. Normally, if you want to shoot handheld at 300mm, you'd have use a high shutter speed. If light is not that good, you just can't go that high, so this is where the VR comes in, it will let you shoot at a lower shutter speed (up to 3 stops lower) without the tripod.

style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #000000"
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