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Old Aug 20, 2007, 7:38 PM   #1
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I have the D80. The battery charger that came with it is multivoltage (100-250V). However, the power cord that connects to the charger is 125V I'm going to be in a 240V country. I have been given mixed info, some say charging my batteries will be a problem and will burn out my charger. Others say, it won't be a problem at all. I just want to be sure that my equipment won't be damaged. Hope you can help me.

Incidentally, my Epson and my Konica-Minolta chargers have the same discrepancy between the voltage on the charger and the voltage indicated on the cord. I find this very strange. More importantly, I want to feel that it's safe using these items.

Thanks.
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Old Aug 20, 2007, 10:20 PM   #2
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See my detailed reply to your other post. Just get the adapter plugs from WalMart or RadioShack. They convert the standard American plug to fit all sorts of foreign plugs.
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Old Aug 21, 2007, 6:00 AM   #3
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fotogal...

I too own a D80 and I just this very second looked down on the floor at my charger which is an MH-18a (standard D80 charger),, and on the back it reads AC100-240V...

Here's my best guess...

These chargers have virtually no weight and they will be what is known as a switching-mode power supply. The usualtype power supply (which is the heart of a charger) consists of a transformer which simply steps down voltage to the desired voltage via a ratio of the primary windings to the secondary windings within the transformer. What does that mean??? It means that if you plug a transformer made for 120v powermains into a 240v mains, you will get double the output voltage and will fry whatever it is you wish to run it on, inyour case, charging a battery...

BUT,,

As I said, that was for a transformer type charger. You can tell simply by the weight of the MH-18a that it has not got a transformer inside it and it is a switching-mode supply which can most likely run on the stated voltage on the back of the charger, from 100v to 240v... Having made a few similar charging systems for myself, I know that some power supplies can have a very wide input operating voltage range. They simply limit the voltage coming out regardless of the voltage going in... You may needa newcordwith the correct plug on the end for the country you are visitingbut I believe you "should" be able to operate the charger itself on 240v...

That's MY opinion based on what is stated on the charger - "AC100-240v"...If you want absolute proof,a telephone call to the supplying agent will do miracles...
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Old Aug 21, 2007, 10:40 AM   #4
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I now understand that the charger unit will be all right while traveling abroad to countries with voltage up to 240. My concern is the voltage on the power cord that came with the charger.

If anyone used this Nikon charger with the power cord while traveling abroad, please, please let me know. I'm going to China in two weeks and am very concerned about this cord!!

Incidentally, I have the appropriate adapters to plug the unit in while abroad. So, for me, the issue is not the adapter, but the power cord that came with the charger.
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Old Aug 21, 2007, 10:55 AM   #5
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I have and not 8 months ago my daughter did.

Remember, cords designed for 120 volts will need wires twice as thick as cords designed for 240 to carry the same load. In effect, your cord will, therefore, be twice as safe on 240 than it is on 120. Have no fear. Again, all you need is the plug adapter.
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Old Aug 21, 2007, 11:13 AM   #6
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Thank you so much.

Hope the techs at Nikon read your reply. I called them three times and spoke to three different technicians. They all told me the cord could not be used there and if I did use it, I ran the risk of overheating and fire. Can you see why I was so nervous??
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Old Aug 21, 2007, 11:39 AM   #7
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Not that he needs it, but I'll validate what Henry said both in regards to the charger being able to handle 240v as well as the 120v cord having twice the load carrying capacity at 240v.

Amperage (current draw) is what will melt a cord. Since Watts = Amps x Volts, and the Wattage ALWAYS stays the same (watts = the amount of work being done), doubling Voltage halves Amperage. This is the reason that high draw appliances like electric stoves and water heaters run on 240v.
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Old Aug 21, 2007, 11:42 AM   #8
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Yes ... however the techs at Nikon, because of our litigatious society where all "eye"s must be dotted and "tee"s crossed and can bring lawsuits by the million, are not allowed to state that all you need is a plug adapter.

If you check other forums you will find that Nikon's tech replies have been the same, but the majority of us world travelers have gone ahead (as I and my daughter have) and used the stock USA cord with the adapter plugs with no problems. And, too, paying a lot for a simple cord which is almost impossible to get adds some profit to the coffers. Again, thecharger/wall wartmust be rated for 100-240 or therabouts.

Now, I might be concerned if it was a 240v cord being used on 110 as the 240v cord gauge MIGHT be smaller. The formula Watts=Volts*Amps is all a tech needs to know. If your charger draws 2 amps at 100 volts (200 watts), it will draw 1 amp at 200 volts (200 watts).


on Edit: thanks dwaldman ... I was typing my reply and you posted first! Good example! Can you imagine what whould happen if our electric ranges ran on 120vac ... our power cords would be as thick as my wrist! One of the reason much of the rest of the world uses 240vac or similar is because it saves resources ... wires can be half as thick, motors weigh half, they all use half the copper or thereabouts. And they regularly use 440vac for heavier motors where we use 240 for the same reasons of resource conservation.
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Old Aug 21, 2007, 12:00 PM   #9
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hgernhardtjr wrote:
Quote:
...And they regularly use 440vac for heavier motors where we use 240 for the same reasons of resource conservation.
and why all the motors in our shop (from the little 5HP all the way up to 50 or more) are 440v as well. As it is, the feed from the transformer on the pole runs one wire in each 2" conduit....
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Old Aug 21, 2007, 1:56 PM   #10
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Wow.....this is getting way above my unscientific head.

As long as the Nikon charger and power cord will do what it's suppose to do in China without burning down the hotel, as admonished by the Nikon reps, then I'm a happy traveler!!
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