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Old Aug 22, 2007, 3:03 PM   #1
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It shocks me literally!

If i have it plugged in the pc with the USB cable i get shocks from touching the hot-shoe, the thens (all metal) and even the tripod it sits on.

This is kind of worrying. I don't want my camera to get damaged because of this, and i don't want to get shocked all the time.

Does anybody experience this as well? Or does anybody know a possible solution?

Thanks,

A shocked D50 user.
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Old Aug 22, 2007, 4:13 PM   #2
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For a kick-off, keep you camera UNPLUGGED from that PC, at least until you do find out what its origins are...

Even though I don't get a shock from my camera being plugged into my PC, I DO get shocks off my PC, mainly from the audio plug outlets. I can't trace it easily as my PC is inter-connected through my AV system. I have it connected to a seperate ampflifier to listen to mp3's and also connected to my DvD recorder which is connected toanother home theatre amp, the LCD display and alsothrough the wall to the TV room with its satellite TV box. Now anywhere I touch any audio/video plug, in my room or in the other, I get a shock. I measured the voltage and it is about 70-75 Volts AC, so it's not enough to deep fry me but it's enough to give me a decent buzz. It's been like this for years now andit hasn't done any damage and I haven't been able to trace its source. I have unplugged every single component one at a time and measured any residual voltage and it always seems to be there, even on the TV antenna on the roof, so I have simply given up and let it be... I only get a shock when I touch a centre pin of any plug and then earth out myself on something like the PC or DvD recorder chassis. If I don't actually get a shock, I certainly feel a humming on my finger. It's a very strange sensation...

Look,, if you have been doing this for quite a while, there maybe little or no "actual" danger to any component, or it should have shown up in a puff ofsmoke by now... On the other hand, if you know anyone who can trace this voltage, employ his/her services and put yourself at ease. I would still get it checked out... I have accepted my fate and simply live with it as I am satisfied that it will not do any damage and is merely a residual voltage somewhere. I have been messing around with electricity for over 35 years now and even though I am stumped by its origin, I am at ease with its presence... I personally feel yoursmay bea similar residual voltage but I can't comment on the effect it may have...

Get It Checked Out....
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Old Aug 22, 2007, 10:52 PM   #3
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1. Check the power-cord of your PC, to see if it's 3-wire, and that the Earth-pin (the apex of any triangular plugs) is in good condition, to prevent any leakage.

2. Replace the USB cable

3. I am not sure, but the flash voltage could be very high (even under normal situations). Your contact with the hot-shoe but not other parts of the D50 may make you exposed to higher voltage.
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Old Aug 23, 2007, 1:53 AM   #4
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Thanks for the comments guys.

I tried replacing the USB cable but still got the problem, so i'm going to retrace the shock like you suggested.
In Holland not every power outlet has an earth pin, so i'll install my pc in another room and let you guys know if it made any difference.
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Old Aug 23, 2007, 7:13 PM   #5
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4. Test the leakage of the PC itself - Detach any USB and the D50 from your PC. Dry you hands. Slide a finger gently & slightly over the surface of the PC case. If you feel some electrostatic, then the PC has had leakage already. Anything connected to it will simply relay the leakage.
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Old Aug 24, 2007, 12:55 AM   #6
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Do like I do with mine

Never plug it in to the PC

I have never plugged a camera into the pc since the first one I got years ago and I hated the software that was used to transfer pics to my pc. SoI got a Card reader and removed my card from the camera and nowI bypass all the stupid camera software and go straight to the folder and drive that I want my pics to be in.

You can get a cheap little card read from http://www.newegg.com for about $5 and that way you will never have to worry about blowing up your loved D50

once you use it like that you will probably love doing it like that

I knowI do


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Old Aug 24, 2007, 10:07 AM   #7
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So far it seams that its the internal circuits of the pc that leads the current, the case doesn't display any signs of electrostatic behavior.
When i connect the camera to a laptop I don't get shocked, so it's not an issue with the camera.
I hope the ground connection from the next room also runs through this room so i can just change the outlet and be alright.

TexasHillBilly thanks for the suggestion. Unfortunately my workflow forces me to connect my camera to my pc during a studio shoot. But for home use i'll go and fetch one of those little card readers
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Old Aug 25, 2007, 4:39 AM   #8
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I am totally lost in how your work flow forces you to connect the camera to the PC

Seems to me it would always be better and easier to remove card insert card insert new card and keep shooting. then insert card in pc transfer and do what you need to do and then remove card and insert in camera when needed and always reformat card before each use.

Do you print from the camera?

That is the only reason I can think of that you would have to connect to the pc and then Id think you would only need to connect to a printer not the pc?

I am confused please explan


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Old Aug 25, 2007, 4:39 AM   #9
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I am totally lost in how your work flow forces you to connect the camera to the PC

Seems to me it would always be better and easier to remove card insert card insert new card and keep shooting. then insert card in pc transfer and do what you need to do and then remove card and insert in camera when needed and always reformat card before each use.

Do you print from the camera?

That is the only reason I can think of that you would have to connect to the pc and then Id think you would only need to connect to a printer not the pc?

I am confused please explan


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Old Aug 25, 2007, 8:16 AM   #10
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Pretty simple.
I do some occasional studio shoots and use Nikon Camera Control pro for directly importing images and Adobe Lightroom for categorizing and full screen viewing. That way i have full color histograms and exposure control and it's way better to see photos on a big calibrated screen than on the small display of the camera.
Using my camera without a direct connection with the pc is too risky as it could mean wrong exposures and sharpness without me knowing it.

I hope it's clear enough, i'm not that good at english.
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