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Old Oct 30, 2007, 7:49 PM   #1
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Could someone help me with a few things, please? I've read the manual several times, but I still can't figure a few things out.

First, I'm trying to take photos of my cat so that his eyes are open. I shoot in Auto mode, but the flash keeps popping up and firing, resulting in squinty-eyed photos; I tried switching to Program mode, but that slows the shutter speed down dramatically, resulting in blurred photos.

Second, how do I set the camera to burst mode, with or without the flash going off? I tried the AF-C, but the camera still took photos one at a time, at 1/60 of a second.

Third, in trying to accomplish the above two objectives, I now see a second folder, 101ND70S, in addition to the original folder, 100ND70S. The first folder has 136 photos, numbered 1 to 148. How do I get back to having just the 100ND70S folder and continue with photo 149? :angry:

Thank you for any and all assistance.

EDIT: I apologize. I see (now that I've posted this) that it should have been posted in the dSLR forum.
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Old Oct 31, 2007, 8:14 AM   #2
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I moved it for you.

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Old Oct 31, 2007, 8:40 AM   #3
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D70s_Owl wrote:
Quote:
First, I'm trying to take photos of my cat so that his eyes are open. I shoot in Auto mode, but the flash keeps popping up and firing, resulting in squinty-eyed photos
The problem with squinting eyes is due to your camera's preflash.

Because of the CCD (camera's sensor) reflectivity, digital cameras don't use the same flash metering technique we saw with OTF (Off the film) metering.

Instead, flash systems on digital cameras use a very short preflash to help judge the length of the main flash burst needed. This preflash occurs just before the mirror flips out of the way, approximately 100ms before the main flash.

Most people don't notice it (although a small percentage of the population will blink with a preflash and you'll get photos with closed or partially closed eyes). Some animals tend to be impacted more.

There are some ways around it. With the camera's built in flash, you can use manual power settings. This will probably require you to use manual exposure on the camera and use test shots to get the exposure right for a given subject distance. You can choose between multiple power levels (full, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16) in the flash mode menu.

Flash mode - TTL auto, Manual output (full, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16) and no monitor preflash is emitted for slave flash operation or Commander mode to control SB-800 or SB-600 speedlights in wireless mode

Another way is to use a flash that has a built in sensor with an Auto mode that doesn't rely on a preflash to judge exposure. These types of flash systems measure the reflected light via a built in sensor during the flash exposure and terminate the flash output when they see enough light for the selected ISO speed and aperture. So, they don't need a preflash.

You can use an inexpensive non-dedicated Auto Thryistor type flash with this type of Auto mode (reliant on built in sensor) if you don't mind using manual exposure on the camera and setting the flash and camera to match for aperture and iso speed. A Sunpak 383 Super is one example.

Or, there are dedicated flash systems with an auto mode like that (for example, a Metz 54MZ4i with the correct foot for Nikon DSLR models), so that you don't need to use manual exposure on the camera.

Quote:
I tried switching to Program mode, but that slows the shutter speed down dramatically, resulting in blurred photos.
The reason you get blurry photos without the flash is because the camera has to keep the shutter open longer to expose the image. If it tried to use a faster shutter speed without a flash, you'd end up with an underexposed (too dark) image. Indoor lighting is much dimmer to a camera than it appears to the human eye.

What lens are you using? Stay on the wider end (least apparent magnification) with most zooms indoors without a flash (if you zoom in much, most lenses lose a lot of light).

A brighter lens (larger available apertures, represented by smaller f/stop numbers) is better for indoors without a flash. I'd pick up a Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AF lens for that purpose if you don't want to use an external flash. The 50mm f/1.8 AF lens is a prime (fixed focal length versua zoom) lens. You can pick one up for $100 or less at most dealers. It's much brighter than most zoom lenses, allowing faster shutter speeds for the same lighting and ISO speed.

But, in some lighting, you may find a flash to be a better solution.

Also increase your ISO speed to get faster shutter speeds. Each time you double your ISO speed, you can use shutter speeds twice as fast for the same aperture and lighting. This will increase noise (that grainy look you get). But, sometimes noise is better than motion blur.

Quote:
Second, how do I set the camera to burst mode, with or without the flash going off? I tried the AF-C, but the camera still took photos one at a time, at 1/60 of a second.
AF-C is a focus mode (continuous focus). Change your Drive Mode (a.k.a., Shooting Mode) to Continuous.

While looking at the back of the camera, if you press the button (just to the right of the BKT button), that changes your shooting/drive mode (single frame, continuous, self timer, etc.).

Quote:
Third, in trying to accomplish the above two objectives, I now see a second folder, 101ND70S, in addition to the original folder, 100ND70S. The first folder has 136 photos, numbered 1 to 148. How do I get back to having just the 100ND70S folder and continue with photo 149? :angry:
I don't know. Perhaps one of our Nikon shooters can comment. I think you can probably select how it handles the folders via a custom setting though.

I see a Folders choice in the Setup menu that probably allows you to select the desired folder.

  • Folders - Select, Create, Rename or Delete image folders
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Old Oct 31, 2007, 11:06 AM   #4
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JimC wrote:
Quote:
D70s_Owl wrote:
Quote:
First, I'm trying to take photos of my cat so that his eyes are open. I shoot in Auto mode, but the flash keeps popping up and firing, resulting in squinty-eyed photos
<quote> The problem with squinting eyes is due to your camera's preflash.

Because of the CCD (camera's sensor) reflectivity, digital cameras don't use the same flash metering technique we saw with OTF (Off the film) metering.

Instead, flash systems on digital cameras use a very short preflash to help judge the length of the main flash burst needed. This preflash occurs just before the mirror flips out of the way, approximately 100ms before the main flash.

Most people don't notice it (although a small percentage of the population will blink with a preflash and you'll get photos with closed or partially closed eyes). Some animals tend to be impacted more.

There are some ways around it. With the camera's built in flash, you can use manual power settings. This will probably require you to use manual exposure on the camera and use test shots to get the exposure right for a given subject distance. You can choose between multiple power levels (full, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16) in the flash mode menu.

Flash mode - TTL auto, Manual output (full, 1/2, 1/4, 1/8, 1/16) and no monitor preflash is emitted for slave flash operation or Commander mode to control SB-800 or SB-600 speedlights in wireless mode

Another way is to use a flash that has a built in sensor with an Auto mode that doesn't rely on a preflash to judge exposure. These types of flash systems measure the reflected light via a built in sensor during the flash exposure and terminate the flash output when they see enough light for the selected ISO speed and aperture. So, they don't need a preflash.

You can use an inexpensive non-dedicated Auto Thryistor type flash with this type of Auto mode (reliant on built in sensor) if you don't mind using manual exposure on the camera and setting the flash and camera to match for aperture and iso speed. A Sunpak 383 Super is one example.

Or, there are dedicated flash systems with an auto mode like that (for example, a Metz 54MZ4i with the correct foot for Nikon DSLR models), so that you don't need to use manual exposure on the camera. </quote>

OK, I just set the camera to AF-C (because I want the camera to auto-focus continuously); Continuous Shooting Mode (for multiple frames per second); and I bumped the ISO to 400 from 200

Quote:
I tried switching to Program mode, but that slows the shutter speed down dramatically, resulting in blurred photos.
<quote>The reason you get blurry photos without the flash is because the camera has to keep the shutter open longer to expose the image. If it tried to use a faster shutter speed without a flash, you'd end up with an underexposed (too dark) image. Indoor lighting is much dimmer to a camera than it appears to the human eye.

What lens are you using? Stay on the wider end (least apparent magnification) with most zooms indoors without a flash (if you zoom in much, most lenses lose a lot of light).

A brighter lens (larger available apertures, represented by smaller f/stop numbers) is better for indoors without a flash. I'd pick up a Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 AF lens for that purpose if you don't want to use an external flash. The 50mm f/1.8 AF lens is a prime (fixed focal length versua zoom) lens. You can pick one up for $100 or less at most dealers. It's much brighter than most zoom lenses, allowing faster shutter speeds for the same lighting and ISO speed.

But, in some lighting, you may find a flash to be a better solution.

Also increase your ISO speed to get faster shutter speeds. Each time you double your ISO speed, you can use shutter speeds twice as fast for the same aperture and lighting. This will increase noise (that grainy look you get). But, sometimes noise is better than motion blur.</quote>

I'm using Nikon's 18-70mm zoom lens at the moment.

Quote:
Second, how do I set the camera to burst mode, with or without the flash going off? I tried the AF-C, but the camera still took photos one at a time, at 1/60 of a second.
AF-C is a focus mode (continuous focus). Change your Drive Mode (a.k.a., Shooting Mode) to Continuous.

While looking at the back of the camera, if you press the button (just to the right of the BKT button), that changes your shooting/drive mode (single frame, continuous, self timer, etc.).

Quote:
Third, in trying to accomplish the above two objectives, I now see a second folder, 101ND70S, in addition to the original folder, 100ND70S. The first folder has 136 photos, numbered 1 to 148. How do I get back to having just the 100ND70S folder and continue with photo 149? :angry:
<quote>I don't know. Perhaps one of our Nikon shooters can comment. I think you can probably select how it handles the folders via a custom setting though.

I see a Folders choice in the Setup menu that probably allows you to select the desired folder.

  • Folders - Select, Create, Rename or Delete image folders </quote>
I'll cross my fingers and, as you say, hope that 'one of our Nikon shooters can comment.' Meanwhile, I'll re-visit my post here with the results of the changes I made, mentioned above.
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Old Nov 1, 2007, 1:29 PM   #5
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After playing around in Fully Manual mode last night, I think that's the only way I'm going to be able to use my D70s's Continuous Shooting Mode. With my Nikon 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 lens, it'll also require a relatively large/wide aperture and slow shutter speed in order to shoot without the built-in flash.

As for why a second folder shows up when I plug my camera into my Mac and the photos in that second folder start the photo numbering sequence over at 1, 2, 3, etc., I think I'll have to take my D70s to a camera shop to fix that. :?
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Old Nov 4, 2007, 5:05 AM   #6
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The D70 has a trick to get around this, and still let you use the wonderful TTL matrix metering!
Go to the menu (custom setting) 15 - AE/AF lock.
This enables the exposure lock buttoin (to the right of the viewfinder)
Select FV lock

Compose the photo. When you have the right compostiion (especially subject distance) press the AE-L button. A pre-flash will be fired to set metering for the flash.
Subsequent shots will use the same flash exposure. So long as your cat doesn';t move about too much the exposue will be spot on and no further pre-flash will be fired.
Keep the shutter speed fairly high to avoid blur from ambient light.


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Old Nov 5, 2007, 4:08 PM   #7
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Mickey, your cat is GORGEOUS!


Does the trick you mention work with the D70s in full-manual mode?

Thanks for your assistance.
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Old Nov 6, 2007, 2:41 PM   #8
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Yes, FV lock works in all modes.
The only downside is that if you forget it, when outdoors in sunlight you think you're locking exposure and in the meantime just setting off flashes!
You should remember that with this technique of pre-setting the flash you need to have a similar subject in view when you lock the exposure.
I found it works very well for my cats!
The kitten is Chanthra now 5 months old.
She had a touch of the flu at the time I took the photo but is OK now.

I used the flash off camera with remote flash. (I'm using a Sigma 500 Super)

Mike
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