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Old Jan 5, 2008, 2:34 AM   #1
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I have a d40 and aquired a new af-s Nikkor 70-300mm 1:4.5-5.6 G lense for Christmas. I was shooting pics inside of people and notice 99% of them had red eye bad. Previous to this, I was using the stock 18-55mm lense. It took wonderful pics of anything, especially people. No red eye ever!

Any thought?:?
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 8:24 AM   #2
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Assuming the subjects faces are about the same size composition with both lenses the 70-300 will have a far more direct line to the back of the eye and cause your problem. Since the 18-55 has the subject much closer to you the path the the retina is not as direct and thus has less reflection. To get rid of it you will have to move the flash away from the camera. Red-eye is caused by reflected light from the back of the eye, red in us, greenfor dogs and cats.
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 10:27 AM   #3
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Thanks, that is great words of wizdom. So...should I be in the market for an SB-800? Or is this not far away enough?:?
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 1:38 PM   #4
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Either the SB-600 or the SB-800 will work for you. You want to use bounce flash. Here is a sample photo.

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Old Jan 5, 2008, 9:37 PM   #5
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I have not heard the term bounce flash. Will you explain in detail for me?
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 10:14 PM   #6
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The term really describes itself. Most advanced flashes allow you to tilt the head up in various degrees up to 90 degrees (straight up). When the flash fires it "bounces" off the ceiling (which is hopefully white, otherwise you'll get a color cast). This softens the effect of the flash, and causes the shadows to fall at a lower angle behind the subject, rather than directly behind it. Bouncing your flash does lessen the output and reduce the range, so it takes a bit of practice to get correct exposure. Bounce flash cannot be used with really high or colored ceilings.
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Old Jan 5, 2008, 11:26 PM   #7
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Ah Ha! Duh! Now that you put it that way, makes total sense. Learning quickly here! Thank you for input. :-)
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