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Old Jan 10, 2008, 5:22 AM   #1
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Hi Guys,

I'm now in receipt of my new D300 and boy am I chuffed to bits1

After upgrading my camera I now looking to get a good quality prime lens for portait work, to do my camera justice!

Ideally I would plump for Nikon glass but at the moment it's out of my price range.
After doing a bit of research i've discovered this Sigma lens:

Sigma 150mm f2.8 APO Macro DG EX HSM

It's appears to have very good reviews and I'm assuming it could also double for portraits.

Does anyone have any experience with this lens or could they reccomend an alternative?

Many thanks!
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Old Jan 10, 2008, 7:57 AM   #2
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Hi longside 1,

I have purchased Sigma 100 mm lens for my D-70 cam. few month back for Macro photography.... And I double it up as a portriat lens too.... It is a very nice lens, Images are sharp and full of details.....

I am posting my Macro images taken in Sigma 100 mm lens ( Hope If it helps you)


A.





B.




Can't post the portrait, As my subject is not allowing me...


Liu



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Old Jan 10, 2008, 9:11 AM   #3
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150mm seems a little long for portaits to me. But that depends on your syle I guess
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Old Jan 10, 2008, 11:43 AM   #4
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tjsnaps wrote:
Quote:
150mm seems a little long for portaits to me. But that depends on your syle I guess
I have this lens. It is an excellent macro lens, bright, fast, sharp. But, I have to agree with tjsnaps that it might be a bit long for straight portrait shots. With the 1.5 crop factor on the D300 (which, BTW, I have been using since Nov.) you would be using a 225mm (35mm equivilent) for your portrait work. I think that that's just little too long. But, I love this lens.
Best of luck,
Steve
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Old Jan 10, 2008, 12:07 PM   #5
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Thanks for all the helpfull feedback folks, much appreciated!

After taking on all your advice I've still decided to stick with Sigma but instead of the 150mm I've plumped for the Sigma 70mm F2.8 EX DG macro.

Like the 150mm the 70mm seems to be a good quality lens for what i want so now i cant waitto get it hooked up to my D300!

Thanks again!
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Old Jan 11, 2008, 8:09 PM   #6
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I have to disagree with the masses. 150mm isn't too long for portraits. Click on the link below, it's a Shutterbug review of the Sigma 150mm. The first few sentences sums it, I agree 100%. The compression makes a wonderful portrait. I have the Nikon 85mm, 105mm VR, and 135mm DC I use for portraits. And I have to say the 85mm gets used far less than the other two. Compression is a wonderful thing. I have found that a longer working distance keeps clients relaxed. I shoot about 40 weddings a year, and have shot a ton of portraits even with the 80-200mm 2.8 @200mm. I can shoot natural, candid portraits of my couple from a distance that allows them the privacy to be themselves.
I don't believe there's a right or wrong in photography, it's whatever you want. I wouldn't rule the 150mm out, using a long focal length for portraits will set you apart from most shooters. There are quite a few photographers using the Nikon 200mm f2 for portraits, a great piece of glass.

Good Luck!
stephen

http://shutterbug.com/equipmentrevie...ses/1206sigma/
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Old Jan 11, 2008, 10:24 PM   #7
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I tend to agree with photoguy66:
http://forums.steves-digicams.com/fo...mp;forum_id=65

-> Indoor portrait might be an issue, but outdoor you want a longer lens - Heck I even use a 300 f/2.8 for portrait since it compresses and defocus the whole background from the subject which you can't achieve with a shorter lens!
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Old Jan 12, 2008, 1:34 PM   #8
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Some of my best candids and portrait style shots were in the 200mm to 300mm range. It really comes down to what you like as far as results. I am sure there is no absolute right way and I have seen some portrait style shots taken with the 10-20mm Sigma lens and Pentax K10D.

The lens you are looking at can serve your purpose (indoors would be limited to what kind of distance you can have between you and your subject)and other purposes as well. Good choice.

Tom

P.S. I am looking forward to your shots with your new D300.

Last edited by vIZnquest; May 7, 2009 at 7:53 PM.
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Old Jan 12, 2008, 4:03 PM   #9
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You can take good people photos with any lens you choose. It's all in how you use it. But the word portrait sagest something a little more formal to me. It sagest you are going to interacting with and directing your subject. You may even walk up and comb their heir for them. The medium telephoto was established as the standard portrait lens. As much because of working distance as lens properties. Much longer and you subject is too far away to take direction. Much shorter and they will feel uncomfortable with you sticking the camera in their face. But as I said in my first post, it depends on your style.
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Old May 7, 2009, 9:15 AM   #10
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Default Portrait lens

Just thought I'd chime in. ---I would think a 150 mm lens for portrait work outdoors could be an acceptable choice, since you will probably have the ability of moving closer or further away from your subject. However, those lenses are usually 2.8 or even 3.5 depending on the quality, and of course cost of the lens. Therefor, I would always prefer a 1.4 or 1.8 opening so I can have complete control over the background. This would especially be true indoors. So a good quality 85 mm or 100 mm, 1.4 or 1.8 would be my first choice.

Last edited by gobs22; May 7, 2009 at 9:19 AM.
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