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Old Feb 5, 2008, 12:00 AM   #1
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Yes indeed.

Ea0lier this evening I journeyed to the closest camera store - that had the D300 in stock - and bought it. I got it with the 18-200 lens, as well as the 70-300 (not the 2.8). I know that I will want that 50/1.4, for it, and maybe have enough left over to get something for that really wide low end. I have played with this camera for a little while, and can see that there is SO MUCH to learn about it, but that I will have immense fun while growing into the knowledge & use of it. Boy, that is (compared to my Pentax K10D) a loud shutter :-). I am not complaining - just remarking.

There is something that I hope a member, here, might shed some light on, for me:

1). Instant Review.

After taking a picture, I find that the review stays on the screen until such time as I depress the arrow/preview button, or lightly press on the dhutter button. What I would like to know is this: is there a possible way to set it up so that a captured image will display just briefly on the screen (like, maybe, 3-5 secconds) before shutting itself off? My K10D features that, and I just wanted to know if the D300 could be set up that way also.

2) Shutter Lag?

I inserted a "?" above, because of not knowing, for a certainty, if what I am experiencing might be due to "Shutter Lag". When I take any pictures, I find that there is too long a period of time between when the shutter button is depressed - and when the picture is actually taken. I mean, it is worse than our little P&S compact digital camera. It must be something that the camera had been previously set on (I bought a display/demo unit), because - even with the built-in flash being in the resting position, there is a light which emanates from the front of the camera body. I thought I was losing it (my mnd :-)) when I saw a light bursting forth - when it was so plain to see that the flash was in the 'down' position. So, I am wondering if that might have something to do with the 'Shutter Lagging' experience that I am having. Please let me know.

3). Curved Lines.

I will try to post some pictures on this, tomorrow, but I am noticing how straight surfaces, somehow, come out with a slightly 'curved' look on the LCD screen. Some are more pronounced than others, but these are in areas that I know are physically straight - yet come out not so on the screen.

4). Picture Quality.

Once again, let me say that I am not registering a complaint - because this (as well as all of the above) could - and quite possibly so - be attributed to my not having proper knowledge of the camera, and its functions. But I have noticed (other than the curvatures mentioned) how super nice my photos look on the screen. On the first couple that I shot, I couldn't WAIT to get them into the computer. Once there, I was knocked down some, by the difference in picture quality. In no way did they look anywhere like they did on the camera's screen. They were so vibrant, and so sharp - on the LCD. But, in the computer, they looked totally different. The vibrancy was no longer there, and neither was the sharpness. I have never seen worthier candidates for some LightRoom adjustments. In all honesty, I don't mind going to the computer, for some PP, on photos that weren't captured as 'rightly' as I would have hoped. But I really hadn't expected the computer's rendering to be so far away from what was revealed on the D300's screen. It isn't a monitor issue, because there was never a problem, such as this, with my K10D's files. Whatever I saw on its screen was, pretty much, what I got on the monitor. At least it was a great deal closer than what I am now getting.

I just got my camera today, and promise that I will do some real reading of the manual, tomorrow. I just hoped that someone might have some quick & reassuring answers for me, on these issues. This D300 is going to work out nicely for me - and I know this. I just have to get used to it.

But I thank you, in advance, for any help in these concerned matters.

Blessings,
Nathan
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Old Feb 5, 2008, 3:29 AM   #2
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I just wanted to say that item#2 (in the above post) is no longer an issue. I did a full reset, and this seemed to correct that problem.
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Old Feb 5, 2008, 5:23 AM   #3
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1. Instant review time is a setting in the custom functions. I'm not sure which one (as I don't own a D300) and Nikon tends to change their CSM settings with every camera.

3. Expect some linear distortion if your using the 18-200, especially if your shooting on the extreme wide end. Curved lines are a function of the lens, and have nothing to do with the camera. All wide angle lenses suffer from this problem to some extent, and it is correctable in post processing.

4. The LCD gains up, brightening your image artificailly. Also, unless your monitor at home is calibrated, expect images to appear differently. If you shoot RAW the differences will be even more prominent.


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Old Feb 5, 2008, 10:21 AM   #4
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Hey RJ ~ thanks man.

I will look into what I have to do for the 'calibration' of my monitor. But please answer this one other question for me:

As earlier mentioned, I purchased two zoom lenses with my camera; one is the Nikkor 18-200 VR, and the other is the Nikkor 70-300 VR. I kinda went a little crazy in that store :-) (something that is somewhat uncharacteristic of me), and now wonder if I might have handled my 'lens' matter a little differently/better. I say this because my 18-200 reaches a good bit into the range of my 70-300. Now, I know that it isn't necessary to stop the range of one lens, right at the point where the range of another begins. But I am thinking that it might have been better for me to come closer than what I did. So I was thinking about taking the 18-200 back for, maybe, the 18-70, or the 16-85. I am yet quite the novice with these matters, but my manner of thinking is that the lesser span - in the latter two mentioned lens type - might yield better renderings. Plus, I would feel that I hadn't wasted money on that portion of the 'doubled-range' coverage betwixt the two lens that I purchased.

If you (or anyone) could answer this for me - ASAP - I would most grateful. I hate to ask for expediency, with this info request, but it would be much better to take the 18-200 back - as quickly as possible (if it is determined that I should) - for an exchange.

Advanced thanks.
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Old Feb 5, 2008, 11:44 AM   #5
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NLAlston wrote:
Quote:
Hey RJ ~ thanks man.

I will look into what I have to do for the 'calibration' of my monitor. But please answer this one other question for me:
So I was thinking about taking the 18-200 back for, maybe, the 18-70, or the 16-85. I am yet quite the novice with these matters, but my manner of thinking is that the lesser span - in the latter two mentioned lens type - might yield better renderings. Plus, I would feel that I hadn't wasted money on that portion of the 'doubled-range' coverage betwixt the two lens that I purchased.

If you (or anyone) could answer this for me - ASAP - I would most grateful. I hate to ask for expediency, with this info request, but it would be much better to take the 18-200 back - as quickly as possible (if it is determined that I should) - for an exchange.

Advanced thanks.

FWIW, the 18-200 VR is a great, All-In-One' travel lens but its IQ will be a bit less than the 18-70 DX+ 70-300 VR;I'm not sure of the IQ of the 16-85, personally. What's your shooting preferences? The 70-300 VR + 18-70 DX would probably give you better IQ but you'd be in the lens changing mode on ocassions. If you want/need the extra reach, the 70-300 VR would be the one to keep.

At - http://www.photozone.de/active/survey/querylens.jsp

User reports IQ at the Wide (Wide Open/Stopped Down) + Long (Wide Open/Stopped Down)--

18-70 DX 57/73 + 60/72

18-200 VR 51/71 + 45/62

70-300 VR 85/96 + 70/83

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Old Feb 5, 2008, 11:54 AM   #6
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You have already discovered the number one affliction of Nikon camera owners...NAS (nikon acquisition syndrome). I would recommend you handle your situation this way. Keep the 18-200mm for now. Although I'm not a big fan of superzooms, it is the best in its class and is a solid, one lens solution that will work in many shooting situations. After using this lens for a few weeks, you'll have an idea of where your equipment is limiting you. If you find you often wished for extra reach, then keeping the 70-300 is a good idea. If you find you need extra width, go for the 16-85 (or 18-70) sell the 18-200 and keep the 70-300. Or pick up an ultra wide (like the sigma 10-20 or tokina 12-18). The good news is both the lenses you have are desirable, and you won't have any problem selling them should you need to. You may find you like to do macro work, in which case a dedicated macro lens would be a good idea. I would also highly recommend an SB600 or SB800 flash. It can be fired off camera and will do as much to help your photography as any lens you may purchase.


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Old Feb 5, 2008, 4:53 PM   #7
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RJ.

It's very good advice that you have given, and I have decided to put halters on the situation - and hold on to what I have. In all honesty, I do feel that I have been blessed with a very good start, and that I have enough to keep me busy - and growing in - for quite some time. I did, however, go out to pick up the SB-800. So now, I am 'flash ready' :-). In time, I will amass some more - really nice - glass. But that will be after I have learned a great deal more about this deep love interest of mine. I appreciate you, my friend - I really do.

Thanks ever so much.

Blessings,
Nathan
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Old Feb 5, 2008, 10:26 PM   #8
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You soundas excited as I was one week ago today when I bought mine. I was not overly happy with the first few photos I took with my D300 but that wasbecause it was stillin "P" (Program)modewith god knows whose settings, most likelyfactory settings which were totally unsuited to the shots I was trying to take. At that stage I didn't even know how to change settings, but thenI began tinkering. In a weeks time you wont be looking back and you'll be more than happy. The D300 is one awesome camera.

Isimplycarried onusing all the lenses I had accumulated with my D80. The two most "in favour" lenses I have at the minute for the D300, are the 18-200 VR and the 70-300 VR. These are two VERY different lenses only sharing one thing - VR... Even though they have an overlap in focal lengths, they give different results and should be used in different circumstances. I also have many other lenses but these two are the two I would carry with me if I had to cover as much of my areas of photgraphy as I could with two lenses. Trying to cover everything with one lens - hey, it just wont happen. I also have a Sigma 70-200 HSM f2.8 with a 1.4 teleconverter which "should" be a great lens but as of yet I haven't tried it. I did use it on the D80 with some fantastic results but for my type of shooting, I need, or should I say want the VR lenses, as I have blood pressure and at times cannot hold a camera still for trying. VR simply spoils me and I love it. The 18-200mm is a very usable lens and can cover maybe 75% of what I need in a tight spotand is the best lens for me to have mounted for the off-the-cuff shots. Most of the time I use it from about 25 to 100mm asit seems to give best results for me in here... When you look at thephysical overlap and the usable overlap of the two lenses, you notice they become more of a matched setwith each other. They are by no means perfect but they are very usable. You could have made a slightly better choice of lenses,, you also could have made a worse choice too... For the price these two are great value...


I have tried about one-third of my lens arsenal on the D300 and it seems that the D80 gives great shots but the D300 gives slightly better with each.

Hey, you have a great camera. Hang in there and experiment. You'll have a ball in the next week or two... I'm still hyped...
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Old Feb 6, 2008, 4:25 PM   #9
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I've had my D300 about two weeks (upgrading from a D100) and I consider it the best photographic move I have made in 40 years. When the D200 came out a lot of folks said new owners would be disappointed with photos taken with the default settings. All I did on the D300 was switch it to RAW and set the D lighting to Normal and even the first shots would the "P" setting seemed outstanding to me.
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Old Feb 7, 2008, 2:15 AM   #10
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Fewpicks & Zorki1c ~ thanks.

Yes, I am extremely excited about everything, and the only thing that isn't so great is my not having the time that I'd like to give to my photography. It has been a little busy for me, lately, but (whether it's ten minutes here, or twenty minutes there) I always try to get some time in with my camera. I know that I will have to discipline myself toward spending some quality time with the manual, and I will do that. I am also awaiting the D300 Elite Videos that I ordered, last night. That 2-DVD set has gotten a lot of rave reviews, and I can't wait to get hold of them.

I am yet trying to grasp the full understanding of how ISO's, shutter speed & aperture settings affect one another. I can say that I had taken some very nice photos, with my K10D, but there was always a trial & error method about my having done so. I really want to get this 'down', and feel that those DVD's are to play a very major part in that.

I wish to be able to look at a potential capture, and have a reasonably good idea - beforehand - what settings should be considered for the shot. I know that this isn't always a sure thing - not even for those who are quite seasoned in the trade - but it shouldn't have to be the guessing game that "I" have to play :-). I'll get it, though.

I haven't tried the 70-300 on my camera yet, but that 18-200 is sweet, indeed. I know what you mean about the VR feature on these lenses, because it is making such a difference with my long-ended shots with (vs without) the VR. It is ever apparent to me that the built-in-the-lens stabilizing feature is better than the in-camera design.

All in all, it is just SO much fun.

Blessings,
Nathan
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