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Old Nov 15, 2008, 3:19 AM   #11
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Hello,

If the camera suits you well or not depends on how you use it. And if the lenses that come with focus motors build inside will suite your style. learning manual focus can be handy as well... some dark lit places don't auto focus well...or fast enough..then manual focus is way faster.

There are a few lensesThat will be used quiet often:

Something like 10-20 mm (if you like really wide pictures or like to make close encounter full body shots of people / buildings.

17-55 or24-70 These 2 lenses are used quiet often: both medium wide angle view till a bit zoom.

70-200 to have a bit more zoom...for portait uses most times. or animals that are close and not too camera shy. effectively this lens became a 105-300 mmbecause you D60 has a crop factor. Your camera sensor is smaller then a full frame camera...that makes your camera zoom in more then a full frame...which makes your camera great for distance shots. 200 mm becomes 300 mmstandard! and the diafragma stays the same!

For animal shots get a lens near 200 or even 300 or more.

Look if the lenses that you like have motors or not.... D60 is a capable camera. It mostly depends on the user. How are you going to use the equipment that you have.

Have fun with this camera or the D80!
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Old Nov 15, 2008, 3:25 AM   #12
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deadshot wrote:
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I have the D40x which was the previous model to the D60. I am certainly no expert and not as knowledgable as Jim C but as a matter of interest I have taken aquarium shots with a 18-200 vr. For whats its worth I have been very pleased with my results. Wouldn't win any prizes in a wildife mag but plenty good enough for me.

I get up as close to the glassas possible, to cut out reflections and boost the ISO according to whether the fish is slow or fast moving so that I can get the nescessary shutter speed.

Jim C thanks for your previous help regarding RAW coversion ,I am now doing fine with it.
Everyone will have good moments and shoot good pictures. If you look in magazines.. you will think or know ...he I could do that too =) Thta's supposed what we people should think --> I heard dutch people say: the glass is half full....not half empty... just look and learn..improve along the way...!
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Old Nov 20, 2008, 6:46 PM   #13
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I charged up the battery and read some of the manual but wow is all this new stuff confusing to me. I took some quick pics with it and they seem dark... I then turned on the lights and it looked a little better. I am using the stock 18-55mm lens. Is this a good lens or sohuld I be looking at the one mentioned above?



Thanks,

Luis
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Old Nov 20, 2008, 9:29 PM   #14
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Are any of these lenses any good for me? The guy is local to me..

http://tampa.craigslist.org/hil/pho/906153560.html


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Old Nov 22, 2008, 2:47 PM   #15
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The first one is the only one of the three that will work with your camera model as it has a motor built into the lens.

The second one is a very good lens but it does not have a built-in motor.

The last one I would not even consider buying for any reason.

The 60mm is a top notch lens and fastest of all the lenses being that it is 2.8.

2.8 is faster than 3.5 and 3.5 is faster than 5.6 and so on.

These numbers represent the aperture (opening) at the rear of your lens. More light when the aperture is wide open and visa versa. When shooting in lower light situations fast glass makes a huge difference in getting the shot you envision or desire.

I would go manual with a 50 1.8 though and skip all those lenses. You will save alot of money and the shots you are after can be done with it.

I see that too many times people are totally dependent on autofocus lenses and never venture or try to learn to shoot manually. The challenge/reward to me is reason enough to give it a go.
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Old Nov 24, 2008, 4:50 PM   #16
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vIZnquest wrote:
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The first one is the only one of the three that will work with your camera model as it has a motor built into the lens.

The second one is a very good lens but it does not have a built-in motor.

The last one I would not even consider buying for any reason.

The 60mm is a top notch lens and fastest of all the lenses being that it is 2.8.

2.8 is faster than 3.5 and 3.5 is faster than 5.6 and so on.

These numbers represent the aperture (opening) at the rear of your lens. More light when the aperture is wide open and visa versa. When shooting in lower light situations fast glass makes a huge difference in getting the shot you envision or desire.

I would go manual with a 50 1.8 though and skip all those lenses. You will save alot of money and the shots you are after can be done with it.

I see that too many times people are totally dependent on autofocus lenses and never venture or try to learn to shoot manually. The challenge/reward to me is reason enough to give it a go.




Thanks for everyone's input. I picked upo a mint lens on ebay for 70.00 shipped. We will see when it gets here ....
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Old Nov 30, 2008, 9:10 PM   #17
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Received my lens and set the camera to manual and wow the pics are blurry. Can anyone assist me with some quick settings for manual mode?



Thanks,



luis
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Old Dec 7, 2008, 7:01 PM   #18
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The focusing must be done by the user. The focus ring on the lens will show the subject to become either clearer or blurrier.
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Old Dec 7, 2008, 7:38 PM   #19
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There are no quick settings for manual mode. When in manual, you have to set aperture, shutter speed and Iso on your own based on the conditions to get the correct exposure. Also, the settings will depend on what effects your are trying to achieve or your own creative vision. Try using the camera in program mode to get an idea of what the settings the camera will use to get the proper exposure in a given situation.Once you understand how exposure works, you'll have a baseline on choosing your own settings.

For what it's worth, I almost never shoot in full manual mode. I'll typically shoot in aperture priority, unless the conditions are difficult and i can't get reliable exposures from the camera.
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Old Dec 8, 2008, 10:16 AM   #20
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To follow up on what rjseeney said:


Exposure is controlled by 3 variables:
1.Aperture – how much light gets to the image sensor
2.Shutter speed – how long the sensor is exposed to the light
3.ISO – how sensitive the sensor is to that light

Aperture – how wide the iris in the lens opens to let light in. Measured in f-stops. The f-stop is a ratio of the opening to the physical focal length of the lens. Because it's a ratio, if the focal length stays the same, and the opening gets wider, the ratio (or f-stop) gets smaller.

What you need to know off the bat is – the smaller the f-stop the wider the opening and thus the more light that gets in. There is another resulting affect – depth of field. The wider the aperture for a given focal length, the less of the image will be in focus. The narrower the aperture for a given focal length (i.e. the larger the f-stop) the more of the image will be in focus.

Read here to get an understanding of depth of field:
http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tu...ries/dof.shtml

F-stops are measured in FULL STOP or PARTIAL STOPS (usually 1/3 stop).
Full stop values: F1.0, f1.4, f2.0, f2.8, f4.0, f5.6, f8.0, f11, f16, f22, f32
(there's a pattern that makes it easy to remember – every other stop is a doubling f1 – f2 – f4 – f8 – f16 vs. f1.4 – f2.8 – f5.6 – f11 – f22)

Shutter speed – how long the shutter stays open and light hits the sensor. It is measured in seconds. In most cases the shutter is open far less than a second – so the notation is typically 1/x. Shutter speed is also often referred to in STOPS. Full stop values are typically 1/15, 1/30, 1/60, 1/125, 1/250, 1/500, 1/1000, 1/2000, 1/4000, 1/8000. Notice every STOP is a doubling. The camera is usually capable of changing shutter speeds in 1/3 stop increments though.

ISO – how sensitive the camera's sensor is to light. Also measured in full and 1/3 stops. Full stop values are 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200. Notice again every stop is a doubling of value. ISO 200 is twice as sensitive to light as ISO 100. The negative affect of higher ISO though is you get a lot of digital noise in the images.

Now for the fun part – how they all work together.

Think of proper exposure as the image looking good – not too dark, not too light. Let's say you take a photo that is properly exposed.
Let's say the 3 variables for that photo are: ISO 200, f8.0 and 1/250.
Now, those exact settings aren't essential for the proper exposure – what is essential is their RELATIVE value to each other.

You can change the sensitivity of the sensor (ISO) up or down. If you change it up without changing the other two values, the image will be too bright. If you change it down without changing the other two values the image will be too dark.
The same holds true if you change only aperture (fstop) or change only shutter speed.

BUT, if you change ISO UP and one or both of the other two variables DOWN you'll get the same exposure.
SO, original shot was ISO 200, f8.0 and 1/250
If you move ISO up 1 stop to 400, to get the exact same exposure you need to move one or both of the other 2 variables DOWN by a total of 1 stop.

So ISO 200, f8.0 and 1/250 has same exposure as ISO 400 f16 1/250 has the same exposure as ISO 400 f8.0 1/500

Similarly if I bump ISO up from 200 to 1600 (3 stops), I can change the other 2 values by a total of 3 stops. So I could gain 3 stops of shutter speed –
ISO 200 f8.0 1/250 has same exposure as ISO 1600 f8.0 1/2000


So, how do you decide which combination of these 3 variables you want?

Ah hah, that's what photography is all about.




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