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Old Apr 3, 2009, 9:50 AM   #11
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I use my old MF lenses on my D50 and focusing is indeed a little trick. You can use the focus indicator in the view finder to confirm your focus, but it's a little touchy and its in a bad place (in the corner of the viewfinder) making it hard to keep you eye on the indicator and the focus area at the same time.



I installed a third party focus screen with an old fashioned split image rangefinder and microprism collar. It works well but it takes up a lot of the image area on the smaller DX viewfinders, and can get distracting. It was easy enough to install but next time I'll pay a repair shop to do it. Because even though I tried to do it in as clean of a place as I could I still ended up with a little dust inside the viewfinder.



As I mentioned in the other thread. Its easy to AI modify Your Pre- AI lenses yourself. But if you have it done (or had it done) just make sure the back of the aperture ring clears the EE tab on the camera. This tab did not exist on many film cameras and was not taken into consideration with many lens conversions, even ones done by repair shops.
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Old Apr 3, 2009, 4:57 PM   #12
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So basically, it's either:

~$2000 - D700 and all my lenses will be what they were and work well.
~$1500 - D300 everything will work pretty nicely and I'll have a DX sensor.
~$700 - D200 and 3rd party screen I'll have nice, fast, old lenses and then probably have to buy a multi-purpose/wider lens like an 18-200 or something.
~$400 - D40 and not really use the old lenses a whole lot, get a couple decent lenses, and end up spending more money than I would've anyway....

I'm interested in this, right now, as a hobby. I think I'll probably do the D200 or the D300 and the katz-eye; if I ever want to go really pro or win the lottery I'll get the full frame.

I don't think I'd afford any advantage from the 300 if I'm getting the katz-eye or other brand focusing screen so I'm looking at the D200. It sounds like those work pretty well from this thread and other places online.

The D700 is rather tempting ...


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Old Apr 3, 2009, 8:15 PM   #13
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I've had a quick look at prices, and this is what I found (differs slightly from your prices)

D700 around $2200
D300 around $1350
D200 around $750

Up to you now!!!! :-)

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Old Apr 3, 2009, 10:20 PM   #14
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Guy around here who runs a certified Nikon store is going to order a D300 and let my try my lenses with it (He usually only stocks D90s because of the people around here.) He suggested I also get a 24-135 or 24-200 VR, I think I'll go for the lower range (presuming higher quality) since my 85mm is going to be a 127mm or something.
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Old Apr 4, 2009, 9:20 AM   #15
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A zoom starting at 24mm will only get you the field of view of a 36mm lens on a full frame DSLR. Plus you already have your 24mm F2.

I would be inclined to get something starting at 18mm.
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Old Apr 15, 2009, 4:57 PM   #16
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Anyone have a link to the referenced thread about DIY AI conversions?

-------------- Bill
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Old Apr 15, 2009, 8:10 PM   #17
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http://rick_oleson.tripod.com/index-107.html


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Old Apr 15, 2009, 11:17 PM   #18
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Again I must point out that the instructions provided on the link above is not a full conversion. It does not take the EE lever into account and therefore the lens could still damage a modern camera. As well as not work properly.



The EE lever is at the lower left side of the lens mount. (If you're facing the front of the camera) The aperture ring must clear this lever to avoid damage. For Auto exposure a tab on the lens must push the lever down when the lens is set at its smallest aperture.



As someone without skill or tools I have found it best to file/grind down the rear of the aperture ring evenly all the way around so that it is even with the mount flange. Then add the AI and EE tabs. I have done this by simply super gluing a piece of wood cut from the center of a tooth pick to the aperture ring and it has worked for years. And frankly it looks better than many of the "machined" modifications I have seen.
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Old Apr 28, 2009, 2:51 PM   #19
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http://aiconversions.com/index.html

Here's a good site that does conversions. I keep hearing good things about him - unlike other places that reportedly do them.

You can also checkout
http://www.momentcorp.com/review/nik..._versions.html

and

http://www.photosynthesis.co.nz/nikon/serialno.html#135

I am just looking to get a D300 and have several manual focus lenses from 35mm days, that I want to use. Hence my "library" of useful web sites. If they have not been converted, I am told they can do some damage to the D200 or D300.

Good luck
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Old Apr 28, 2009, 3:27 PM   #20
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Dear Saxartist;

First, allow me to express my condolences for your loss. I find it admirable that you choose to keep the memory of your dad alive thru photography.

After having read all these posts, one alternative that has not been discussed, is the idea of you selling all the gear (maybe hang on to a piece for sentimental reasons) and buying the exact equipment that you want.

What I seem to be reading is a lot of information on how to make pieces work together that were not originally designed to work together. I am reading that there a bunch of stuff that isn't current.

So here's my thought... As a fairly new photographer, I need every advantage aroundso I can get good photos. I trust a autofocus more than I trust my ability to manually focus. I want pieces to fit together because they were made to fit together. Let me try it differently. I have a set of antique golf clubs made with hickory shafts. Beautiful set. But I don't play them because I'm afraid of breaking the wooden shaft. So someone tells me to re-shaft those 100 year old iron heads and go play them. Nice idea, but the advances in the iron head of golf clubs has grown astronomically since these heads were made! So keep the antique clubs as they are. Go buy a set of the best clubs you can afford, those clubs will give you the best possibility of playing well.

Last, I do mean to imply that you are a poor photographer, nor am I implying that you don't know how to handle photo equipment. I am saying it sounds like you keep trying to fit the square peg into a round hole achieving a poorer result than you might if you were using current gear that was made to work together.

Again, no offense intended, no disrespect towards you nor your father, this possibility may get shot down by the folks here who know far more than I do about photography.

Faithfully yours

FP








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