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Old Apr 13, 2009, 10:44 PM   #1
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Hello Fellow enthusiasts,

As stated above, the skin tones on my D80 are not consistent in (P) with matrix metering.
I hate to say it, but my old F717 has more consistent exposures, colors and skin tones.
Also, auto white balance is not consistent in unchanged conditions. I am beginning to think I should have gotten a Canon?
Please say its user error!!!

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Old Apr 13, 2009, 10:44 PM   #2
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Old Apr 13, 2009, 10:52 PM   #3
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Old Apr 13, 2009, 10:55 PM   #4
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Sony just gets it right 90% of the time..
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Old Apr 14, 2009, 12:55 PM   #5
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Angel,

WB is definitely tricky. Of the shots you posted, the last one with the sony is the easiest to 'get right' by any camera.

Your second shot, the WB looks very good - but the shot is underexposed. Adjust that in post processing and the skin tones should look much better.

Shot 3 can be a tough one as well - any time you have a lot of reflected colored light in a shot there's a higher likelihood the camera will botch the white balance.

Shot 1 doesn't have very good skin tones and that was from the SOny.

Here's the thing about photography - there is no magic camera - it doesn't exist. I shoot with a canon 1dmkIII - a pro body. I don't expect my camera to get exposure correct in all circumstances (that's why they invented manual exposure or Exposure compensation) and I don't expect (nor does it give) correct WB in all situations. The key is to learn your gear and learn where it will have difficulty. For example - the shot in the pool - lots of reflected blue light and nothing 'white' in the image for the camera to guess what white should look like - lots of cameras will get that WB wrong. The take away for you as a photographer? Shoot RAW in those instances. The other shot is fine with a correct exposure.

I just got done yesterday processing my vacation photos taken with my mkIII. Guess what? It screwed up the WB in a number of instances where I left it on 'auto' and shot jpeg.
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