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Old Jul 23, 2009, 11:00 PM   #11
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Default 100% crop of the Yellow Bell Pepper Top

OK, Sue-

Here is a 100% crop of the Yellow Bell Pepper top showing its focus in detail.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 23, 2009, 11:09 PM   #12
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Default 100% Crop of the Red Pepper top

OK, Sue-

Here is the 100% crop of the Red pepper top showing you that because the Bell Pepper tops were set up parallel to each other, the Red bell Pepper top is also now reasonably in focus.

So there are two issues here to learn: (1) how you set up the photo can affect the photo's visual outcome. (2) knowing where your DSLR is focusing is more critical on a DSLR camera than on a point and shoot digicam. The digicam due to it much, much small imager has a lot of depth of field that is inherent to the design of the digcam. On a DSLR camera we have to be a bit more precise.

I hope that might be of help as you start working with your new Nikon D-90 camera.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 24, 2009, 12:09 AM   #13
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Originally Posted by ride16 View Post
I definately think the green in the first two pictures is a color cast from the blanket. To get a good comparison, try taking the same shot in the same place with both cameras. I just got my D90, too (a couple of months ago) and it really does take amazing pictures. I thougt nothing could replace my beloved Panasonic FZ20, which took GREAT pictures, but the D90 blows it out of the water.
I'm glad you're loving your D90. I'm probably going through an adjustment period. The simplicity of a P&S & knowing how to get the best out of it is quite different from the learning curve of a DSLR.

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OK, Sue-

Here is the 100% crop of the Red pepper top showing you that because the Bell Pepper tops were set up parallel to each other, the Red bell Pepper top is also now reasonably in focus.

So there are two issues here to learn: (1) how you set up the photo can affect the photo's visual outcome. (2) knowing where your DSLR is focusing is more critical on a DSLR camera than on a point and shoot digicam. The digicam due to it much, much small imager has a lot of depth of field that is inherent to the design of the digcam. On a DSLR camera we have to be a bit more precise.

I hope that might be of help as you start working with your new Nikon D-90 camera.

Sarah Joyce
Thanks for the informative tutorial Sarah. Good to know I need to pay more attention on focus & layout of subject. I will try again tomorrow with that in mind & make a few changes,maybe try the flash,if Hannah will allow it.I'm having to operate the camera one-handed when photographing my dogs. One hand has to keep their attention so they will look in the direction I need.This camera is a bit heavy & it's possible I may be letting it slant downward a bit when I press the shutter. My cloud pictures turned out great & the non-posed photos I took of Hannah without the green backdrop didn't have the discoloration. Thanks for all your help Sarah,I really appreciate it.Hopefully I'll come back after a few days of practice with some better photos. Maybe I will even take a digital photography course.
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Old Jul 24, 2009, 12:54 AM   #14
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Default Digicam Photo Sample

Last one for the evening Sue-

This photo was taken with the Kodak Z-1012 using the camera's built-in flash. Notice the greater depth of field that puts everything nicely into focus.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 24, 2009, 12:56 AM   #15
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Default 100% Crop of the Above Posted Photo

Sue-

Here is the 100% crop of the above posted photo. All nice and sharp.

sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 24, 2009, 2:51 PM   #16
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It's interesting Sarah you saying about the shallower DOF with DSLRs.
If you look at the snails photo that I took on the thread that Sueg started.
" The complete package D5000 " page 4, as Jim Cs version is an improvement on my original. What suprised me was that the heads the snails are eating are out of focus but the shells are not.Allowing for the fact that full out my 18-200 only opens up to F5.6.I was amazed! I was about 2-3ft from the Snails I couldn't get closer so used LV as they were high up.

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Old Jul 24, 2009, 3:26 PM   #17
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Last one for the evening Sue-

This photo was taken with the Kodak Z-1012 using the camera's built-in flash. Notice the greater depth of field that puts everything nicely into focus.

Sarah Joyce
I think I understand your point Sarah. Now I just have to remember it when I'm setting up for my shot. It was easier with my little P&S. I'm thinking I will eventually get the superb quality of photos,but not by doing it the P&S way I'm accustomed to. I did some experimenting today with the same settup. The discoloration is indeed the reflection from the green backdrop. It wasn't as bad with my P&S,but it was there.The shots I took without the green backdrop had no discoloration. I couldn't get the flash to work outside in the bright light,no matter what I tried.None of my outdoor shots today were good quality. So I moved my setting inside,near a natural light source & turned on the redeye reduction. The photos showed a great improvement & no green reflection. I'm going to assume I need to purchase an external flash to use outside. Here's one of the photos I took today,same backdrop,but indoors with flash.

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Old Jul 24, 2009, 3:27 PM   #18
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Deadshot-

The very selective focus of a DSLR equipped with a lens like the Nikon 18-200mm VR lens is something that is overlooked by more than a few DSLR users.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Jul 24, 2009, 3:32 PM   #19
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Hi Sue-

You got a much improved photo from today's shooting of Hannah. The the focus was right where you wanted it.

I think you hit on the primary point of my examples: you are going to have to modify some of your shooting and photo techniques when you move from a point and shoot camera to a DSLR camera. They are decidedly different camera types.

Yes, at least for my style of shooting, I consider an external flash is a must. I own the SB-400, the SB-600, and the SB-800 flashes. With the high ISO capability of your D-90, you could probably get by with the little SB-400. It does not swivel, but it does have full tilt capability. The SB-400 is small and very handy. I like it a lot and use it often. That would let you get into an external flash at the $(US) 110.00 price range. The SB-600 will be more than twice that price. The SB-600 is the midsize flash in the group and a very good flash.

Sarah Joyce

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Old Jul 24, 2009, 4:37 PM   #20
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Quote:
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It's interesting Sarah you saying about the shallower DOF with DSLRs.
If you look at the snails photo that I took on the thread that Sueg started.
" The complete package D5000 " page 4, as Jim Cs version is an improvement on my original. What suprised me was that the heads the snails are eating are out of focus but the shells are not.Allowing for the fact that full out my 18-200 only opens up to F5.6.I was amazed! I was about 2-3ft from the Snails I couldn't get closer so used LV as they were high up.

Your shot looks really good.

As for your flash problem. Were you still in Auto Mode? I have had the same problem until I realized that I was shooting in Auto mode (Which I almost never do anymore) As soon as you which to P (program) A(Aperture) S(shutter) or M(manual) you should have full control of your flash.
I just went outside in full blazing sun and fired off two shots of my hand. One with the flash popped up in P mode and one with the flash down in P mode. I was trying to eliminate the shadows in my hand. The flash fired and mission accomplished.
Try your outdoor shots in any mode other than Auto and the flash should fire. The shots below were taken with a D40 but it works exactly the same for my D80 and D300 too.
Cheers,
Steve

Here are the two shots. 1st, P mode Flash extended.



2nd P mode flash down.

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