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Old Aug 10, 2009, 7:37 AM   #1
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Default Nikon 3000 - Looks pretty good

In looking at the D3000, I wanted to bring out some of the differences between it and the D60. It seems that if you were struggling between the D60 and D5000, the features and the savings with the 3000 make the 3000 more appealing compared to the extra cost of the 5000.

In some reviews there was some complaint on the sensor of the D60 cramming more pixels on the same sensor size as the D40 by having smaller pixels. The 3000 has a larger sensor so the pixels should be larger than those on the D60. It also has the 11 focus sensor that the D5000 has compared to the D60 3 focus sensor, plus the TLM Cam 1000 auto focus compared to the older CAM 530 auto focus of the D60. In addtiion, it also has a larger LCD screen. So it appears that the 3000 offers some nice improvements from the D60 to make the consumer camera more appealing.

What it lacks is the fair video capability of the 5000, flip screen, and live mode on the LCD screen. If those are important to you, then the 5000 would still be a good option.

Last edited by Blueberry; Aug 10, 2009 at 7:40 AM.
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Old Aug 10, 2009, 8:03 AM   #2
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Blueberry-

We will only know the final answers about the D-3000, when we see the first professional review. However, it does look better, based on the specifications data. For those that want high ISO capability, the D-5000, appears to be the answer.

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Old Aug 10, 2009, 8:07 AM   #3
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The D3000 uses a Sony 10MP CCD Sensor (as does the D40x and D60). It's still missing some features that may or may not be desirable to you (for example, exposure bracketing) that you find on higher end models.

The D5000 uses a better Sony 12MP CMOS Sensor that will have better detail retention at higher ISO speeds for a given amount of noise reduction.

But, like the D40, D40x, and D60; the D3000 and D5000 do not have a focus motor built into the camera body. So, if Autofocus compatibility with more lenses is desirable, then you'd need to move up to a D90 (since the entry level models without a focus motor in the camera body require lenses with focus motors built in if you want Autofocus with them). The number of new lenses with focus motors built in is growing though (Nikkor AF-S lenses, Sigma HSM lenses, more Tamron lenses with built in motors). But, if you want to use some of the brighter primes (for example, a Nikkor 50mm f/1.8 or 85mm f/1.8), you wouldn't have Autofocus with the Nikon entry level models. Ditto for many other Nikon and third party zooms. If you plan on sticking with newer lenses with focus motors built in, then that may not be a big consideration.
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Old Aug 10, 2009, 11:18 AM   #4
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Hi JimC-

I have been working with the Nikon D-40, D-40X, and D-5000, and I have quite honestly, have not felt "shut out" as far as lens choices go at all. There are still more than 45 lens available for those cameras.

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Old Aug 10, 2009, 11:30 AM   #5
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Most users wouldn't care. Personally, I tend to use brighter primes or brighter zooms, and would hate to pay the prices that Nikon wants for something like their 24-70mm f/2.8 AF-S lens versus the non AF-S version of a Sigma 24-70mm instead. Ditto for brighter (f2 or wider aperture) primes for portrait use (or use for indoor sports) in the 85mm range (none exist for these entry level models unless you want to use manual focus).

I'd also hate to lose AF compatibility with less expensive longer zooms (like the non AF-S versions of the Nikkor 80-200mm f/2.8 zooms).

If you are only using dimmer lenses (or don't mind spending a lot of money to get f/2.8 lenses with focus motors built in), then it's probably not a big deal. But, if you do want to use those types of lenses (brighter primes, brighter zooms), then you'd probably end up spending more money on AF-S type lenses, compared to buying a body with a focus motor built in that could use lenses without a focus motor, and in some focal lengths, you wouldn't have any good alternatives.
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Old Aug 10, 2009, 3:52 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
Hi JimC-

I have been working with the Nikon D-40, D-40X, and D-5000, and I have quite honestly, have not felt "shut out" as far as lens choices go at all. There are still more than 45 lens available for those cameras.

Sarah Joyce
Sarah (I love that name by the way) what difference have you found when working with the D-40 compared to the D5000? Have you found the viewfinder, the colors or work flow of one better than the other? Do you find yourself using flip out LCD of the 5000 and is one LCD screen better than the other? (Yes I am aware the 5000 has more features like bracketing)

Thanks
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