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Old Aug 21, 2009, 12:18 PM   #1
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Default Interesting Combination: D-40 & 18-105 lens

I was able to purchase a Nikon 18-105mm lens and put it on my D-40 as an experiment. The results are excellent and the resolution amazing I am really pleased.

Here is a 100% crop to give you an idea of the fine detail.

Have a wonderful weekend.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 22, 2009, 1:47 PM   #2
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That's one of the lenses I am considering to replace/augment the 18-55 that came on my (and everybody else's) D40. I bought the 70-300VR for my second AF-S lens, and I want to cover the gap between the two. Interested in how you like it as you use it more.
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Old Aug 22, 2009, 2:38 PM   #3
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KDKarlson-

I have only had the Nikon 18-105mm lens for 5 days now. However, I can share with you that it is a MUCH BETTER walk around lens option than the Nikon 18-55mm lens. I can tell that already. I also own the Nikon 70-300mmVR lens, so the new lens is a much nicer transition between the two lenses.

I will keep you advised via this thread on how things work out as I get on with the new lens.

Have a wonderful weekend.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Aug 30, 2009, 7:47 AM   #4
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Sarah,
Anything more to share? I'm heading home this weekend, and this lens is on my short list of gear to look at.

Thank you
Kurt
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D90, D40x, D40, 18-55VR, 18-70, 18-105VR, 35f/1.8G, 50f/1.4G, 60 AF-S Micro, 70-300VR, Tamron 10-24, SB600
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Old Aug 30, 2009, 8:29 PM   #5
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I have the lens also; at widest angle, picture distortion is apparent, otherwise things look great.
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Old Feb 3, 2010, 9:16 AM   #6
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Hi everyone. I'm still new to the Dx format (and photography in general). Could someone compare the 18-105 lens to an optical zoom number... such as 8x or 10x ?

Would the X zoom number be the same whether it's on a D40 or a D90 ?

Thanks.
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Old Feb 3, 2010, 10:39 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Logo10heli View Post
Hi everyone. I'm still new to the Dx format (and photography in general). Could someone compare the 18-105 lens to an optical zoom number... such as 8x or 10x ?

Would the X zoom number be the same whether it's on a D40 or a D90 ?

Thanks.
The "X zoom number" you refer to is simply the ratio of the shortest focal length to the longest. For the 18-105, that would be 105 divided by 18, or 5.833X. That ratio is independant of the body the lens is attached to.

But that ratio doesn't mean much on a camera that uses interchangeable lenses. On a P&S camera, there's just the one lens, and the "X zoom number" represents all that camera is capable of. For a dSLR, the "X zoom number" doesn't tell the whole story. For instance, that 18-105 lens is ~6X, and a 70-300 is ~4X, but the 70-300 has more reach than the 18-105.

For P&S digicams, the range of the zoom lens is represented by that ratio, but for dSLRs the range of a particular lens is described in absolute terms, by using the actual focal length of the lens.
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Old Jan 15, 2011, 10:36 AM   #8
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Default Nikon 18-105 VR

mtclimber,

Any more insight or comments regarding your new 18-105 VR ?
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Old Jan 15, 2011, 10:55 AM   #9
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Also keep in mind that the D40 is using a 6MP sensor with larger photosites for each pixel compared to newer Nikon dSLR models with higher resolution sensors.

As a result, less demand is placed on the lens quality needed for best results (since a lens doesn't need to resolve as many line pairs per millimeter to hit the larger photosites).

So, you can sometimes get great per pixel sharpness on a lower resolution sensor as compared to a higher resolution sensor of the same size when using the same lens.

That's not to take anything away from the 18-105mm, as it's a well liked lens. But, when paired with a sensor like the D40 uses with larger photosites for each pixel, I can imagine that combo works nicely, since less demand is placed on the lens quality needed to take full advantage of the sensor's resolution.

You often seen limitations with lenses when going to the latest high resolution sensors (where you may not see any increase in detail with a higher resolution sensor after a certain point, because the lens just can't resolve well enough to take advantage of a denser sensor).

In other words, because the pixels are smaller and packed much closer together on an APS-C size sensor as you increase the megapixel count, the lens resolving power needs to be greater to take full advantage of the sensor's resolution.

For example, the original Konica Minolta 18-70mm kit lens (carried over with a Sony brand name later), was "good enough" for a 6MP sensor.

But, when higher resolution models came along, there became a point when the 18-70mm lens simply couldn't resolve well enough so that the higher resolution sensor offered any benefit with it (as in comparing images from a model like the 10MP Sony A300 versus the 14MP Sony A350 when wearing that lens), due to higher pixel density.

So, if you wanted better results with the higher density sensor, you needed a better lens than the 18-70mm kit lens Sony was shipping with it (and Sony did redesign the kit lenses used on later cameras, switching to a newer 18-55mm design that's much sharper). Here's a review page showing a good example of that problem:

http://www.cameralabs.com/reviews/So..._results.shtml
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