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Old Nov 5, 2009, 6:30 PM   #11
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davidos-

VR means Vibration Reduction and that is Nikon's name for IS. As you might recall, neither Canon nor Nikon offer IS built into the camera body as Sony, Pentax, and Olympus do. Instead Canon and Nikon prefer to sell you lens that have IS built into those lenses. I some cases, thise IS lenses cost more.

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Old Nov 5, 2009, 7:55 PM   #12
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... Instead Canon and Nikon prefer to sell you lens that have IS built into those lenses. ...
That's because Canon and Nikon still sell 35mm film SLRs, and there are still a lot of older Canon and Nikon film SLRs in use. By putting the image stabilization in the lens, those lenses can be used on film SLRs as well as digital SLRs.
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Old Nov 5, 2009, 7:58 PM   #13
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another reason is that IS in lenses works better than IS in-camera, especially once you get at longer focal lengths. also, it not only stabilizes the image of the photo, but also stabilizes the image you see in the viewfinder.
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Old Nov 6, 2009, 12:16 PM   #14
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Ended up waiting too long to get the last camera. Everything i've read points me to the d40, but the better dust protection and AF and screen size on the D3000 are nice, but i take a lot of low light pics and the D40 is about one stop better on high ISO...

So it seems like the best choice.
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Old Nov 6, 2009, 12:46 PM   #15
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davidos-

VR means Vibration Reduction and that is Nikon's name for IS. As you might recall, neither Canon nor Nikon offer IS built into the camera body as Sony, Pentax, and Olympus do. Instead Canon and Nikon prefer to sell you lens that have IS built into those lenses. I some cases, thise IS lenses cost more.

Sarah Joyce
Of course everything is a trade-off. For consumer grade zooms there's virtually no price difference between the various manufacturer's lenses. The only real edge goes to Olympus in my book - not because of anti-shake but because of quality at the lowest price points.

As you move up the chain toward professional grade lenses you'll see some interesting trends:

1. Available lens choices suddenly dramatically favor Canon & Nikon
2. Sony which has in-body IS and some excellent pro grade lenses suddenly get more expensive.

In truth, there are 2 areas involving anti-shake where systems with in-body anti-shake have an advantage.
1) short prime lenses. Below 100mm there just aren't IS/VR lenses in the canon lineup. As I mentioned above though - I don't see this as a really strong decision point. The benefit in short focall lengths of anti-shake is very limited. And as you move up the photography food chain towards advanced enthusiast - which is usually the group that is using prime lenses - you start to realize this. It's a nice-to-have but not a big decision point.

2) adds anti-shake to less expensive third party lenses. Here's where we start to see some actual real world benefit. Suddenly the Sigma 70-200 2.8 at $800 has anti-shake. Now you've got a usable wedding lens at < $1000. That can be a big benefit.

But, when you're down in consumer lens territory Canon and NIkon are simply NOT more expensive to get anti-shake. Just look at all the kit lenses and superzoom lenses from Canon/Nikon - they all have IS/VR and the price points are pretty much right on vs. the competition.
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Old Nov 7, 2009, 1:24 PM   #16
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Kriss,
What did you end up getting and where is the deal? I am in the same boat... D40 or D3000... What is VR?
VR is Vibration Reduction. This feature has been especially useful for times when a tripod is not feasible or allowed and those who no longer have the steady hands they once had.

Whether it is an over rated feature or not is entirely up to the one who is using it and what benefits as stated above it can give.

I use the D40 and it is not long in the tooth by far. It is maybe in digital camera life years so to speak but not in what it can do. Still better than most in its category. It has also lasted longer on the market than the D40x and D60 for good reason. It is a very good camera for the price. The 1/500th flash sync becomes especially handy for outdoor shots to blow out those dreaded shadows and "racoon eyes".

The 35mm 1.8 is AF-S and the Sigma 30mm 1.4 is HSM and can be used with the non-motor models (D40, D40x, D60, D5000 and D3000). Sigma has performed well if a good copy is acquired.
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