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Old Mar 27, 2010, 7:10 AM   #1
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Default Why are my pics blurry? D5000

Hi everyone,

I am new to this forum and to the DSLR world. I have had my Nikon D5000 since Xmas and while some of the photos have been great, most are OK. Yesterday I took my son to a school dance and was taking photos using the 55mm-200mm lens. The photos were looking great on my LCD display but when I got home and downloaded them, many were pretty blurry. I do not know how to shoot on manual mode yet so I was using autofocus and also using the indoor mode and sometimes the sports mode. No matter what mode I used, there was def. some blurriness in the pics. What can I do to take better pics. next time? Oh and I also was taking pics. inside earlier of his class and if someone was moving, the pics still had some blurriness. SHould I be getting out and using manual focus, will this make me a better photographer? Any help and input would be greatly appreciated.




This one was one of the better photos:
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 7:34 AM   #2
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You're shooting indoors in low light, and the shutter speeds you're getting are slow, resulting in motion blur due to subject movement. You can increase the ISO to compensate for the low light, but you'll be risking image noise.
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 8:20 AM   #3
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Quote:
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You're shooting indoors in low light, and the shutter speeds you're getting are slow, resulting in motion blur due to subject movement. You can increase the ISO to compensate for the low light, but you'll be risking image noise.

Or you could invest in a flash. Shooting in manual is not going to change the light levels you're working with.
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 8:24 AM   #4
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You're shooting indoors in low light, and the shutter speeds you're getting are slow, resulting in motion blur due to subject movement. You can increase the ISO to compensate for the low light, but you'll be risking image noise.
I don't want more noise on there, lol.. I will look into getting a flash (anyone recommend a certain type?) for the camera.

Thanks for the help.
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 8:25 AM   #5
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Or you could invest in a flash. Shooting in manual is not going to change the light levels you're working with.
Thanks for the help. Can you recommend one? I don't want to spend to much $$ but at the same time I don't want to get something that is totally useless either
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 9:28 AM   #6
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You can use a flash, but in a school gymnasium, you won't be able to bounce it off the ceiling, so you'll end up with overexposed closer subjects and underexposed further subjects, and possibly even black backgrounds. In order to get shots that are exposed like the ones you've got, but use faster shutter speeds, you'll need either higher ISOs (risking noise) or larger apertures. I presume you're using the kit lens which has a maximum aperture of f/5.6. A lens with an aperture of f/2.8 will let you use shutter speeds that are 4 times faster. A lens with a maximum aperture of f/2.0 or larger (numerically smaller) will let you use shutter speeds at least 8 times faster. That will clear up your problem with motion blur and you can use it in places where flash isn't practical or even allowed, like for indoor sporting events.
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 3:14 PM   #7
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I think you are worrying too much about noise. The camera you have produces excellent results at high ISO settings. It has those settings, why not use them? Every picture doesn't have to be completely noise free, and perfectly exposed, and perfectly everything else in order to be a good photograph. Try shooting some high ISO images. I think you will be pleasantly surprised.
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 3:24 PM   #8
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I agree 100% with jphess-

The D5K is perfectly capable of operating at high ISO numbers. Give it a try.

Sarah Joyce
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 3:46 PM   #9
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At 3200iso, you should get very good results. And if you crop in, it will still need to be 100% to notice the noise. I see these shots were taken at f4 1/60 sec at 1600iso. You should get better results at 3200is at f4 and it will give you a much faster shutter speed about 1/120 so it will prevent the blurring in the movements.

Which lens you use, I see you were about 62mm range. You can also go with a faster prime like a af-s 50mm. But that will cost 450 dollars. Before spending that money, I would really try out 3200iso, and even 6400iso. I shot at 3200iso sometimes, and really do not notice the noise, and my camera is a bit more noise then the d5000 at the higher iso.
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Old Mar 27, 2010, 4:07 PM   #10
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I also have the D5000, and can tell you that there are no problem shooting at 3200 iso.
Try the aparteur priority mode first before you try manual mode. Set it at the lowest aparteur possible, set the iso to 3200 and you should get better photos. Also try different white balance settings til youīre satisfied.
The reason that you don`t see the blur on the lcd is because it is so small, and also have low resolution. You could try to zoom in on the lcd to see a little better how the picture look.
Best regards/Daniel
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