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Old Jun 20, 2010, 3:15 PM   #11
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Default Nikon SB-28DX speedlight for Nikon D5000

JimC

Hi back again. You gave me some great advice about my speedlight as with everyone who replied, the settings you said to try was virtually spot on, I took some photos inside the house and I'm happy with the quality of the photos.

I'm going to a friendís wedding next weekend 26th June so it will be a great opportunity to really try my D5000. I could do with some help with taking shots inside the church during the ceremony, I canít really use flash so I was wondering what ISO to use. I was going to use ISO 800 but not sure if this would be too high or go for a lower setting. Itís too far to drive to the church to have a practice.

Also during the evening reception I will have to use my speedlight and although you gave me the settings to use before Iím wondering if I need the same settings even though the room will be darker and low light.

I know it will be trial and error on the day but I find because the 5000 has a small display screen you canít tell what the photos will be until you view it on a pc.

Appreciate any help

Johnmac
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Old Jun 20, 2010, 3:20 PM   #12
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What lenses do you have?

You really need to see what kind of shutter speeds you're getting, which will depend on how much light is there and the widest available aperture of your lenses.

You may need ISO 3200 just to get your shutter speeds up to something that would work OK, provided there isn't much movement. You may also need to time your shots carefully for the least amount of movement if you're using dimmer lenses (half press to lock focus and wait for pauses in movement before squeezing the shutter button the rest of the way down to take the shots). Lenses with a widest available aperture of f/5.6 when zoomed in much like the typical kit lenses, are not suitable for indoor use without a flash for moving subjects, unless you've got a lot of ambient light (because shutter speeds will be too slow for moving subjects, even at higher ISO speeds). I'd suggest shooting RAW for more flexibility in Post Processing.
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Old Jun 20, 2010, 3:26 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mtclimber View Post
And finally there are 8 battery contacts, 5 channels, plus the camera, your flash, and the Flash Adapter. As you can easily see there are too many connections to fail. So this set-up in my personal trials with it using a Nikon SB-20 flash only works at best 20% of the time.

My suggestion is to forget the possibility of using the Nikon SB-28 flash, the chances of circuit failure is too high to be practical.

Sarah Joyce
Hi mtclimber
I heard this speedlight can cause circuit problems so I emailed Nikon Support and they sent this reply.

Speedlight SB-28DX and D5000

Reference # 100508-000055
Recently you requested personal assistance from our on-line support centre. Below is a summary of your request and our response.


Nikon Europe Support
10/05/2010 | 02:30 PM

Dear John,

Thank you for contacting Nikon regarding your D5000 camera.

The SB-28DX Speedlight can be used with the D5000 camera, however only in Non-TTL Auto and Manual modes. The Manual mode in this case means manual setting of the flash output power on the Speedlight itself. Please click on the link below for further information:

Answer Title: Nikon Speedlight compatibility chart
Answer Link: http://nikoneurope-en.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/6513

If you have any further queries regarding this matter, please click the link above to update your question.

Kind Regards
Nikon Support
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Old Jun 20, 2010, 3:39 PM   #14
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Hi and thanks for getting back to me. I always shoot in raw, in the church I was going to use P mode and a 55-200mm vr and swap between the 18-55 & 55-200 outside the church. I will try and sit at the end of the aisle so I can rotate the display screen so I can catch the bride entering and bride & groom leaving. I'm not experienced or confident to use manual mode.

johnmac
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Old Jun 20, 2010, 3:50 PM   #15
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I'd see what kind of shutter speeds you get (ahead of time if possible). But, my guess is that lighting inside the church is going to be such that you probably won't be able to freeze any subject movement, even at ISO 3200, when shooting with something like that 55-200mm VR.

That lens is just too dim for moving subjects in most indoor conditions (with a widest available aperture of f/4.5 at it's shortest focal length setting, dropping off to f/5.6 as you zoom in).

Unless lighting is much better than I'd expect (lots of ambient light coming in through windows, which I doubt if they're using the typical stained glass windows you see in most churches), you'll probably need to time your shots for the least amount of subject movement to get any keepers without motion blur. So, I'd take lots of photos.

Unless light is better than I'd expect, in that type of environment shooting without a flash, you'd usually want a bright prime shooting at ISO 1600 or so. Or, at a minimum in a zoom, one that can maintain f/2.8 throughout it's zoom range (note that f2/8 is 4 times as bright as f/5.6) shooting at ISO 3200 (or sometimes even higher if you need to freeze movement)

With your existing lenses, I would not expect to get a lot of keepers indoors without a flash unless you can take the shots when the subjects are relatively motionless. I'd see what you get at around ISO 3200. But, if shutter speeds are relatively slow (slower than around 1/200 second, which is still on the slow side for freezing any movement), don't expect many photos that are not blurry if the subjects are moving any.
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Old Jun 20, 2010, 4:02 PM   #16
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Thanks JimC. As a beginner I need as much help as possible, I'll take your advice and get there early and take a few shots and then as many as possible.

Thanks again
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Old Jun 20, 2010, 4:19 PM   #17
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Well, hopefully I'm just being a pessimist and lots of ambient light will be coming in through windows, etc.

But, I doubt it. ;-)

So, I'd take lots of photos. For the ceremony itself, you should be able to take enough photos to get some keepers when there are pauses in any movement if you're holding the camera steady enough and smoothly squeezing the shutter button (to reduce blur from camera shake). But, when they're walking, you're probably going to have a problem getting anything that doesn't have a lot of motion blur if you can't use a flash.

Try to carefully pan with any movement when possible when you're taking shots of the wedding party walking up and down the isle (so that the subjects are not moving across the frame as much, reducing the amount of blur you'll get in the photos). I'd use Aperture Priority with the aperture wide open (lowest f/stop number), and set your focus to AF-C (Continuous) for those.

You may want to take photos in short bursts (setting your drive mode to Continuous) for those types of shots. But, the problem is that you may fill up your buffer too quickly if you take too many photos that way shooting RAW. So, I'd limit bursts to a few shots at a time if you try doing it that way.
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Old Jun 21, 2010, 2:26 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimC View Post
Well, hopefully I'm just being a pessimist and lots of ambient light will be coming in through windows, etc.

But, I doubt it. ;-)

So, I'd take lots of photos. For the ceremony itself, you should be able to take enough photos to get some keepers when there are pauses in any movement if you're holding the camera steady enough and smoothly squeezing the shutter button (to reduce blur from camera shake). But, when they're walking, you're probably going to have a problem getting anything that doesn't have a lot of motion blur if you can't use a flash.

Try to carefully pan with any movement when possible when you're taking shots of the wedding party walking up and down the isle (so that the subjects are not moving across the frame as much, reducing the amount of blur you'll get in the photos). I'd use Aperture Priority with the aperture wide open (lowest f/stop number), and set your focus to AF-C (Continuous) for those.

You may want to take photos in short bursts (setting your drive mode to Continuous) for those types of shots. But, the problem is that you may fill up your buffer too quickly if you take too many photos that way shooting RAW. So, I'd limit bursts to a few shots at a time if you try doing it that way.
How can I check if my buffer is full and how do I free up space? This is on my D5000
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Old Jun 21, 2010, 2:35 PM   #19
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A camera like your D5000 has very fast internal memory (it has an 11 shot buffer for RAW files).

It's writing to the memory card at the same time you're taking photos (but, the speed writing to a memory card is slower than the internal buffer memory). So, once the internal memory becomes full (because it can't write to a memory card as fast as you're taking photos), your frame rate will slow down to the speed it can write to the card you're using. If you're taking short bursts with pauses between them, you may not fill up the internal buffer (and I think it takes something like 13 seconds to flush a full internal buffer to a 30MB/Second Sandisk Class 10 Card from tests I've seen).

But, if you're taking a lot of consecutive bursts shooting in RAW, then, you may end up with much slower performance until you pause long enough for the internal memory to finish writing to the memory card (and that process will be faster with faster cards, and slower with slower cards). If you have a really fast card (e.g., a Sandisk 30MB/Second Class 10 SDHC Card), then full buffer frame rates may not be too bad. But, with slower cards, your frames per second will decrease considerably.

It probably has a counter visible in the viewfinder for shots left in the internal buffer (some cameras do, some cameras don't, and I haven't researched the D5000 in that area). But, you'll want to be careful not to take too many consecutive bursts in continuous drive mode shooting RAW without pauses between bursts to give it time to write the contents of the internal buffer memory to the memory card. Otherwise, your camera may slow down considerably, depending on the speed of the card you're using.
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Old Jun 21, 2010, 2:52 PM   #20
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IOW, it works like this:

Camera's processing > Fast Internal Memory (11 shots with D5000 when shooting RAW)> Slower SDHC Card.

It's writing the contents of the fast internal memory (a.k.a., the camera's buffer) to your SDHC card at the same time you're filling up the internal memory. But, the speed it can write to the SDHC card will be slower than it can write to internal memory. Once the fast internal memory becomes full, your camera will slow down to the speed it can write to the SDHC card. So, if you take too many photos in a row shooting in RAW without a pause, your camera will slow down.
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