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Old Jun 28, 2010, 1:48 AM   #1
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Default More d50 photos.

Posting in here because It's new and they don't all fit into the same category.
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Old Jun 28, 2010, 6:41 AM   #2
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It looks like you're having fun right out of the starting gate! Good luck!

Your images don't have any EXIF data in them. However you reduced the images also stripped out any info that could be used to see your camera settings.
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Old Jun 28, 2010, 2:04 PM   #3
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It looks like you're having fun right out of the starting gate! Good luck!

Your images don't have any EXIF data in them. However you reduced the images also stripped out any info that could be used to see your camera settings.
Sorry I didn't quite follow all of that. I'm not sure what "stripping out any info that could be used to see your camera settings" means. Please explain.
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Old Jun 28, 2010, 2:29 PM   #4
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The image files that come out of your camera have a lot of information about how the photo was taken. This includes the camera used, the lens used, focal distance, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, focus and metering modes, etc. This information can be read in various ways. One handy thing to use when browsing Steve's or a similar site is an "EXIF reader." You can install such a program (many are available for free. I use Opanda, FWIW) and then right-click on a photo and see the EXIF information. This is really helpful when someone says that they want help getting better photos -- you can analyze how they set their camera and see if that was the right thing for the shot they wanted to take. Or, if you see a photo that you really like, you can see how the photographer took the shot.

Anyway, this information is removed from the photo files sometimes. Free versions of noise reduction software will commonly strip the EXIF info as one of the ways they encourage you to buy the full version of the program. Apparently, as TCav suggested, the program that you used to resize your photos for upload to this site also removed that information in the process. It's always preferable to keep that info if you can -- it gives a more complete understanding of what you were doing when you took the photo.

ETA: I just realized that Opanda, in the advanced mode, will show the total number of shutter releases on your camera. The question was asked on another thread how somebody could determine that. Apparently, it is accessible from the extended EXIF data. Who knew?

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Old Jun 28, 2010, 2:48 PM   #5
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The image files that come out of your camera have a lot of information about how the photo was taken. This includes the camera used, the lens used, focal distance, aperture, shutter speed, ISO, focus and metering modes, etc. This information can be read in various ways. One handy thing to use when browsing Steve's or a similar site is an "EXIF reader." You can install such a program (many are available for free. I use Opanda, FWIW) and then right-click on a photo and see the EXIF information. This is really helpful when someone says that they want help getting better photos -- you can analyze how they set their camera and see if that was the right thing for the shot they wanted to take. Or, if you see a photo that you really like, you can see how the photographer took the shot.

Anyway, this information is removed from the photo files sometimes. Free versions of noise reduction software will commonly strip the EXIF info as one of the ways they encourage you to buy the full version of the program. Apparently, as TCav suggested, the program that you used to resize your photos for upload to this site also removed that information in the process. It's always preferable to keep that info if you can -- it gives a more complete understanding of what you were doing when you took the photo.

ETA: I just realized that Opanda, in the advanced mode, will show the total number of shutter releases on your camera. The question was asked on another thread how somebody could determine that. Apparently, it is accessible from the extended EXIF data. Who knew?
Oooh I didn't include the what I shot in. All the night photos were shot with ISO 1600, 1/125th, f3.5, flash.

The one with the light was all the same except I think it was at 1/2 shutter.
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Old Jun 28, 2010, 5:10 PM   #6
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Default Some more...

Some More Photos...
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