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Old Aug 1, 2010, 1:29 PM   #1
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Default Nikon D5000 football shots

Hi I am new to the nikon d5000. I have 4 boys who all play football. What is the best setting so they are not blurry? We play in the morning and at 1pm.


Also we do bmx racing what would be the best setting for that? They seemed to be very bright but not blurry.

Thank you

I have a 70-300 lens that I used for both of these.
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Old Aug 1, 2010, 2:00 PM   #2
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You can shot in aparteure mode with the largest aparteure possible. In daylight it should give you enough shutter speed. Wit a wide aparteure you also get a nice DOF. (Background out of focus/blurry).

I donīt know wich 70-300 lens you have but if you have the Nikon 70-300VR, the widest aparteure is f4,5.

The shutter speed should be at least 500 but you should get up to 1000 or more. If not, shot with higher ISO.

Hope that helps a bit.

Good luck.

Best regards/Daniel
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Old Aug 1, 2010, 5:34 PM   #3
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In addition to the advice that DSProtection has given, you should also set the Focus Mode to AF-C (Continuous), set the AF-Area to Dynamic, and chose the center Focus Point. You may also want to set the Release Mode to Continuous, so you can take multiple photos in sequence as the action occurs.

You might also turn off the flash and the AF Illuminator. You can also turn on Active D-Lighting, to help with the faces.
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Old Aug 1, 2010, 7:07 PM   #4
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Thanks Tcav. I missed those.

Best regards/Daniel
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Old Aug 1, 2010, 9:25 PM   #5
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Okay thank you. I do have the Nikon 70- 300 vr. How do I get it on the release mode to continuous? I had another camera and I did awesome shot's with but this one I am struggling to learn!
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Old Aug 1, 2010, 9:32 PM   #6
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All the options DSProtection and I mentioned are settings for the camera, not the lens.
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Old Aug 2, 2010, 9:50 AM   #7
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Have you set the iso to it's highest setting?

And are you allowed to use flash? If you're allowed to use flash, that can help to freeze motion as well.
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Old Aug 2, 2010, 10:18 AM   #8
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Keeping the aperture at its largest (numerically smallest) setting, when shooting outdoors, will usually permit fast shutter speeds without requiring too high an ISO setting. Also, in general, flash is not permitted at sporting events, and for football, the subject is usually too far away for flash to make much difference anyway.
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Old Aug 2, 2010, 11:10 AM   #9
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Originally Posted by TCav View Post
Also, in general, flash is not permitted at sporting events, and for football, the subject is usually too far away for flash to make much difference anyway.
Actually that's not very accurate. Flash is permitted at more sporting events than it is restricted. It's typically restricted for equestrian, gymnastics and volleyball.

Football, soccer, basketball, wrestling, motocross and a host of other sports allow it. And, distance isn't necessarily an issue - but it depends on the flash. More importantly it depends on the lens. The biggest mistake people make when shooting sports is to try and shoot action too far away for the lens they're using. I use a canon 580exII to shoot football and it has no problems reaching the same distance as my 300mm lens. Another pro who shoots games in my area uses a 400mm lens and his 550/580 flashes have no issue.

You'll also find that a lot of motocross photogs use flash extensively to reduce shadow and make the colors pop. There are some shooters at fred-miranda.com and dgrin.com that shoot MX they can give you some pointers that I'm sure will apply to BMX.

Now back to football - we're talking day games so flash isn't necessary. BUT, be prepared to use ISO 800/1600 unless it's bright sunlight. As mentioned, set your aperture to it's widest setting and keep bumping up the ISO. 1/500 is the bare minimum goal for football but you want to be closer to 1/1000. So, keep bumping up ISO till you get to 1/1000 or ISO800. If you're at ISO 800 stop if you get 1/500 consistently. If not, go to 1600. That will get you started.

When you're ready for the next step, post some of your photos in the sports section and the sports photographers here can help you improve. There's a lot to learn about sports shooting and each sport has it's challenges.

By the way - make sure you're close enough. 300mm is good for about 40 yards of coverage from YOU to your subject. For football that means you need to be on the sidelines, not the stands.
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Old Aug 2, 2010, 12:27 PM   #10
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Great post by JohnG as always. He knows a lot about sports. As he said, raise the ISO till you get to about 1/1000 shutterspeed. Donīt be afraid of the noise you get. Itīs easy to reduce with a noice reduction program. I use Noiseware Community Edition which is great and free. I have shot with ISO 2000 with my D5000 and have no problem with that.

Best regards/Daniel
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