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Old Dec 6, 2010, 9:38 AM   #1
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Default Nikon D5000 help

I have a Nikon D5000 with a Nikkor 18-55mm 3.5-5.6 as well as a Nikkor 70-300mm 4.5-5.6 with a Nikon SB600 flash and I have many questions. I find myself in so many different scenarios; it does get confusing at times, and I still don't have a solid grasp of aperture and Fstop. It seems that I have stumbled into one of the photographer positions at my sons' school, so I am taking pictures of every athletic event (day and night), social calendar event, portraits, and newsworthy events. All of these, along with pics of my grandchildren, weddings, landscapes, vacation, etc., etc., etc. You get the picture. I can't seem to keep it all straight. Right now is basketball season (poor flourescent lighting in the gym and lots of rapid movement-already know it's one of the most difficult). I've been using S priority ISO 1600 1/160 fine image quality (not equipped to deal with RAW photos yet) and the auto focus that looks like a rectangle or the 3D at times. Are these the best settings for this scenario? I am attaching a few recent images for your review. Thanks so much!
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 11:16 AM   #2
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First, none of your lenses are really up to the task of shooting indoor sports like basketball. You'll need either constant aperture zooms (i have a sigma 50-150 f2.8) or primes. Lighting is just too poor and I'm not a big fan of using flash at sporting events indoors. Even at f2.8, you'll likely need an iso of 2000 or 3200 to get the fast enough shutter speeds, which in reality should be closer to 1/500....1/160th isn't fast enough to freeze motion. Also, I never shoot in Shutter priority...it too easily can result in underexposed photos (like the ones you've posted). I always shoot in A at the widest or nearly the widest aperture and adjust ISO up until I reach my desired shutter speeds. The good news is, the D5k can yield usable images at 3200. Make sure you are in continuous focus mode, and not in single shot mode to fire bursts.
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 11:53 AM   #3
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Is the Tamron AF 70-200mm f2.8 a good option for me considering the variety of shots I need?
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 12:47 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cablesforjesus View Post
Is the Tamron AF 70-200mm f2.8 a good option for me considering the variety of shots I need?
It probably would be...I'm not familiar with it. I went with the 50-150 because it's a touch wider without giving up a whole bunch on the long end (and I own a 70-300). 70-200 is a popular range for sports shooting.
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 1:02 PM   #5
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It probably would be...I'm not familiar with it. I went with the 50-150 because it's a touch wider without giving up a whole bunch on the long end (and I own a 70-300). 70-200 is a popular range for sports shooting.
But good luck finding a Sigma 50-150 any more.
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 1:51 PM   #6
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I just have 2 ideas for you.

First, RAW is a good answer for your skin tone problems. It took me a while to bang my way thru, but here's my bottom line. Buy Adobe Lightroom. Find someone who knows how to use it. Spend 30 minutes with them and 95% of the learning curve is over.

Lightroom is really simple to use.

You shoot in RAW, load the images to your computer. Import them into LightRoom. Then you fix the white balance in just one photo taken in the gym. Then Lightroom can make that adjustment to every photo. It's like mass production of all your photos! Now, export them at .jpeg files and make any other changes you want to.

Of course, LR, does so much more. But to get the training-wheels off the bike, you can start with just white balance and mass production.

There are a bunch of smarter people than me on this website and different experts have better programs than LR. But for me, LR was the simplest to use and I love the mass processing.

Second, Sigma makes a 70-200 2.8F lens that is really good. Some test show in some situations it comes out ahead of the Canon 70-200 2.8f. I have not heard that of the Tamron 70-200. The Sigma is also a rather fast focusing lens. I don't think it has image stabilization or vibration reduction. But if you're shooting at 1/200 or higher in order to stop action, you should be in good shape.

So, sit close, use a 70-200 at about a 3.5, shoot in RAW and use LR and have fun.

Faithfully yours,
FP
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 5:39 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tclune View Post
But good luck finding a Sigma 50-150 any more.

I guess I'm lucky

http://www.keh.com/camera/Nikon-Digi...99090104R?r=FE
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Old Dec 6, 2010, 5:47 PM   #8
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[QUOTE]
Quote:
Originally Posted by FaithfulPastor View Post
I just have 2 ideas for you.

First, RAW is a good answer for your skin tone problems. It took me a while to bang my way thru, but here's my bottom line. Buy Adobe Lightroom. Find someone who knows how to use it. Spend 30 minutes with them and 95% of the learning curve is over.
Due to the volume of shots many sports shooters take, many don't shoot RAW (myself included), because of processing time. RAW also tends to slow down your shooting and buffer, so you don't get as many FPS. Just set a custom white balance and you shouldn't have any white balance issues.

Quote:
But if you're shooting at 1/200 or higher in order to stop action, you should be in good shape.
1/200 isn't going to be good enough in many situations to freeze action. If you can manage to time stops in the action (the peak of a jump, etc) it may work. You really need to be closer to 1/500th.

Quote:
So, sit close, use a 70-200 at about a 3.5
Again, even at ISO 3200, f3.5 may not be enough to get the shutter speeds you need.
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Old Dec 7, 2010, 9:20 AM   #9
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Thank you so much! That was very helpful!
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