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Old Jun 29, 2011, 9:05 PM   #1
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Default Nikon D90 E message in display window

Hi, My Nikon D90, won't shoot pictures, was working fine last weekend. There is an "E" showing in the display window, not sure what it means. The sd card is fine, lens attached properly, battery charged, not sure what is going on. I tried different lens to shoot with, same E in the display. Not sure if that means error or what. Help. I can't take pictures. Company coming for the Fourth! Thanks. Love my camera.
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Old Jun 29, 2011, 9:13 PM   #2
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I may have found the problem. "No memory card"message appeared, when I have a 4gb card in the camera, the sd card is not locked. This concerns me. I put a different card in, and I think it might be alright. Still concerned about the images on that other sd card and what is going on??? Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks.
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Old Jun 29, 2011, 9:22 PM   #3
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Back again, when I put the second sd card in the camera, it said "no images". I put the sd card in the pc, and it was full of images! So glad I didn't format and lose my Las Vegas memories. Confused!
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Old Jun 29, 2011, 10:01 PM   #4
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I'd format the card in your PC (copy off any images first, of course!) and then see if your camera can read it. If it can, then format it again in the camera. If it can't but the card works perfectly in the PC then you have a camera fault. I suppose there's no possibility of condensation - the camera hasn't been taken from a cool to a warm place? If neither your PC nor your camera will recognise the card all may not be lost - try it in a Mac (see below).

Memory cards can do strange things. I have a 32gb card that my camera wouldn't recognise, and neither would my PC. On a whim I tried it in a Mac and it worked perfectly. So I copied off the pictures and went through the formatting sequence, on the Mac then in the camera. Works perfectly now!

If you don't have the manual that came with the camera (which should list all the memory codes with meanings) then check online at the Nikon site. I don't have a Nikon, but I've found the Canon site has all the information I might want.
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Old Jun 30, 2011, 12:10 PM   #5
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i just checked the manual and [-E-] does mean the camera cannot detect the memory card, the soloution it says, is to turn the camera off and confirm the card is inserted correctly
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Old Jun 30, 2011, 12:33 PM   #6
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If a flash memory card is improperly ejected from a computer (Windows or Mac) it can corrupt the Table of Contents and render the card unreadable. I've had to throw cards away for this. It's vital always to follow the computer's instructions for ejecting the card, and never just to pull it out.

That said, I did find recently, as I said above, that a card that had become unreadable on both my camera and a Windows computer WAS readable on a Mac, and I was able to resurrect it that route. It's now back in the camera working properly. So if you can get hold of a Mac you can perhaps try some options to resurrect the card.
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Old Jun 30, 2011, 2:14 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by leonidas80 View Post
Back again, when I put the second sd card in the camera, it said "no images". I put the sd card in the pc, and it was full of images! So glad I didn't format and lose my Las Vegas memories. Confused!
It sounds like you may have a bit of oxidation in the card slot where the contacts on the card come in contact with the contacts in the camera.

i'd try removing an inserting the card a half a dozen times or so and see if that helps it (as friction from removing and inserting one can help to clean the card contacts).

As for formatting a card with a corrupted file system (after you get your photos from it), try this utility:

http://www.sdcard.org/consumers/formatter_3/

Are the photos on the card as taken by the camera? IOW, they're not photos you copied to the card from another source or anything, are they?

If so, then it's normal for a camera not to recognize and display them, as cameras are a bit picky about photos you can display. They'll usually want the identical directory structure, file names, sizes, etc., as created by the camera when it saved them; with no modifications to the images (as any modification to the metadata in the image header can prevent most cameras from displaying images on a card).

Also, I've seen some users format cards using file systems that a camera is unable to recognize, because they were not paying attention and used their operating system defaults, which may not have been a FAT or FAT32 File System.

For example, if you formatted a card using NTFS from Windows, or Ext3 from Linux, or HFS+ from a Mac, etc., your computer may be able to use the card just fine, but the camera can't, because it only understands how to interpret a standard 12, 16 or 32 bit FAT (File Allocation table); and is unable to use other file system types. So, if you're formatting an SDHC Card using a computer for some reason, make sure you select the correct file system type. With Windows, select FAT32 from the drop down list of file system types for a 4GB or larger card. If it's a 2GB or smaller card, select FAT from the drop down list (and Windows will use FAT16 for it then).

I'd format the card using the utility I linked to above. Then, make sure to use your Operating System's "Safely Remove" or "Eject" function to unmount the card before you remove it from a card reader. Otherwise, you can corrupt the file system (because you may have writes in the operating system memory that are cached and haven't been written to the card yet). Make sure you always do that if you write to a card (and a delete is a write, too). With Windows, you can just "right click" on the icon for a card under My Computer and select "Eject" to safely remove one.

Then, format the card again using the camera's menu choice for format before using it again. Personally, I do that *every* time I reuse a card (format it using a camera's menu choice for format, not a PC). No exceptions.

That way, I always insure that I start out with a fresh FAT (File Allocation Table), just the way the camera expects it (since it's performing the format). Besides, formatting it using the camera's menu choice for format is usually just as fast or faster than deleting the images anyway (since in most cases, you're just recreating the FAT, not overwriting the entire card).
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Old Jun 30, 2011, 10:52 PM   #8
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As others have said, just pulling the card out of the card reader without using the
"Safely Remove" function can and will corrupt the file system on the card...

Get your pic's off the card and then format the card in the camera...

Good luck...!
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Old Jul 1, 2011, 10:56 AM   #9
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As others have said, just pulling the card out of the card reader without using the "Safely Remove" function can and will corrupt the file system on the card...
... and can permanently destroy the card. It's amazing how few people know this - it's clearly written in any Windows or Mac OS-X manual.
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Old Jul 1, 2011, 7:29 PM   #10
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I have a flash drive I accidentally put through the washer and dryer without loosing one bit of data. But pulling it out of the PC without using the "safely remove" feature will wipe it clean every time.
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