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Old Sep 25, 2011, 12:33 PM   #1
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Default A77 vs D7000 Sensor Performance

Just wanted to put this info out there. DXO graded the sensor of the A77, and I wanted to do a comparison to the long awaited A700 replacement. Nikon sure seems to get the most form a sensor. I included the D3s because that's what I'm invested in.

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Cam...(brand3)/Nikon





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Old Sep 25, 2011, 1:25 PM   #2
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Different sensors. Different camera types. The A77 is using a new 24MP APS-C design with a translucent mirror in the light path (that allows Sony to do things like keep the AF sensors on target all the time without any mirror blackout getting in the way to improve AF tracking, frame rate, etc.).

I've been spending some time comparing images from the A580 (which is using a Sony 16MP CMOS APS-C size sensor like the D7000 uses with a traditional body design), and I'm impressed with what I see so far when viewing images at the same viewing sizes from the A580 and A77. For example, when I use the Comparometer at Imaging Resource.com and look at ISO 6400 images sized to my display from both the A580 and A77 (using the test charts in simulated daylight lighting, as well as the mannequin in tungsten lighting), the A77 images appear to have better sharpness, saturation and contrast (perhaps even a bit too much for my tastes by default) without any noticeable increase in noise levels when you view them at the same size (versus viewing them at 100%, where the 24MP image is going to be larger). They're using prerelease firmware (version 0.58), so it will be interesting to see what Sony comes up for when they release the production firmware for the A77.

Those DxOMark tests don't take things like retained detail for a given viewing/print size into consideration. So, even though the RAW test may show slightly higher noise levels with the 24MP Sensor in the A77 versus the 16MP Sensor in the A580 (about 4/10 of a stop difference), if you consider the extra pixels you're putting on subject and look at retained detail from both at the same viewing sizes, you can end up with more detail from the camera that tests with a slightly higher S/N ratio.

The A580 in the Sony lineup is going to test closer to the D7000 for S/N ratio, as both cameras are using a traditional dSLR design and a Sony 16MP APS-C size CMOS Sensor. Here's there comparison showing the A77, D7000 and A580:

http://www.dxomark.com/index.php/Cameras/Compare-Camera-Sensors/Compare-cameras-side-by-side/%28appareil1%29/734|0/%28brand%29/Sony/%28appareil2%29/680|0/%28brand2%29/Nikon/%28appareil3%29/685|0/%28brand3%29/Sony
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Old Sep 25, 2011, 1:46 PM   #3
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I agree totally with you analysis.

DXO is nothing but numbers. The real measure is how the camera performs for YOUR photography.

The only resaon I posted the thread is there were so many that assumed that the new Sony outperformed the D7000, and I'm not so certain. The A77 will need time in the field to see how it does in reality.

I'm waiting to see the D300s replacement. I'm in hopes there will be a higher pixel density (aka reach) for my long lenses. The truth be told, how the competitors new camera body performs makes little difference to me unless someone finds out how to mount them to my lenses and retain functionality.
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Old Sep 25, 2011, 2:40 PM   #4
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I'm curious if Nikon will end up using the newer Sony 24MP Sensor in any newer models. If they do, then they'll probably squeeze a lot out of it, especially with a more traditional body design without a mirror in the light path like the A77 has.

But, Nikon does seem to be going their own way with more sensors now. The sensor in your D3s is a good example of that, as is the 14MP sensor used in the D3100, and the new 10MP "CX" Format sensor used in the just announced Nikon 1 System camera models.

So, only time will tell what we can expect from future Nikon dSLR offerings.
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Old Sep 25, 2011, 2:52 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fldspringer View Post
I'm waiting to see the D300s replacement. I'm in hopes there will be a higher pixel density (aka reach) for my long lenses.
Well, one problem with higher pixel density in an APS-C size sensor is that you might need very good glass to take advantage of it.

I've already seen examples in the past where some lenses didn't show any improvement in detail captured when Sony went from 10MP to 14MP sensors. For example, you were basically just enlarging the same detail you got from the lower resolution sensor trying to use the older KM 18-70mm f/3.5-5.6 AF lens with a higher resolution camera than the 10MP Sony A100 or A200, since the line pairs/mm the lens was capable of capturing fell short of what you'd need to take advantage of the higher pixel density of the newer sensors (which is probably one reason Sony scrapped that lens design and went to an 18-55mm kit lens that performed better instead when reviews started pointing out the limitations with the old lens design).

Of course, that kind of problem probably helps to sell high end lenses to users that want to get the most out of the latest and greatest high resolution sensors (and 24MP with this new Sony sensor is probably going to end up being a good example of that kind of thing). LOL
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Old Oct 1, 2011, 10:51 AM   #6
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According to Dxomark, it seems the nikon d 7000 shines on my d300s a bit, even when matching the lenses i have with the 7000 the resolution goes up a bit.
Christmas coming up, should i get the d7000 or wait a year for the d400

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Old Oct 1, 2011, 1:08 PM   #7
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I'd say there isn't enough in the D7000 that would make it much of an upgrade from the D300s.

Is there something you'd like to do that your D300s can't but the D7000 can?
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Old Oct 1, 2011, 7:57 PM   #8
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Higher iso usage
Higher resolution figures with same lenses
So far these caught my attencion

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Old Oct 1, 2011, 8:50 PM   #9
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Yes, while the D300s can do ISOs from 100-6400, the D7000 can do from 100-25600.

But the higher resolution is just higher resolution. Your files will be 50% larger and take 50% longer to download, and your rate of continuous shooting will be slower.
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Old Oct 1, 2011, 11:46 PM   #10
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Quote:
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Yes, while the D300s can do ISOs from 100-6400, the D7000 can do from 100-25600.

But the higher resolution is just higher resolution. Your files will be 50% larger and take 50% longer to download, and your rate of continuous shooting will be slower.
What i ment by higher iso is the 7000 can take cleaner pics at higher iso than the 300, with which i can crank up the iso higher for more speed at low light levels which is a big plus for me as i will never be seen with a tripod.
Higher resolutions = cleaner pics,
File size means nothing to me, just buy more cards.
Continous shooting, no bigie, never did sports.


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