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Old Nov 2, 2011, 6:53 AM   #11
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Originally Posted by boBBrennan View Post
Greg....... Wonderfully done!

I enjoy your 'field' images so much. I appreciate your skills as a photographer and recognize the passion for the dogs and the work they do....... it all easily comes across.

thanks, Bob
Thanks much. I do appreciate the comments.
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Old Nov 2, 2011, 6:56 AM   #12
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Greg. I'm with Zig, Wizzard and Bob, and that last shot is on the money!
Thanks Robert. Sometimes you need a little luck. I'm glad I caught that one.
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Old Nov 2, 2011, 7:01 AM   #13
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That about sums it up for me.

Well said, Hawgwild.
Thanks for the support, Zig.
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Old Nov 2, 2011, 5:14 PM   #14
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I slept on my response to your post. How could I reply in a way that was keeping with the photographic theme of this forum. After thinking it though it, this is what I came up with. Pardon me, but these are not all Nikon pics.

I decided to concentrate on something we have in common, some bird pics.

A chickadee



A bobolink



Tree swallow



Green Heron



Barn Swallow



Field Sparrow



I lugged some very heavy camera equipment more than two miles on more than one occasion to try to get a decent pic of thei blue-gray gnatcatcher, this is the best I could do.



Eastern Wood Peewee



Ruby Crowned Kinglet



The Purple Martins



See, something in common.

The last pic shows something that becomes more and more clear as time is spent in nature. It is a very brutal place. From bugs eating bugs in macro to the martins feeding the kids above, something must die for something else to live. Eagles eat fish, the fox seeks the mouse, the owl, the vole, it is all part of the grand scheme. Brutal in its implementation.

One more pic. The robber fly and the wasp.
I'm sorry.

I just saw the picture of the dog with the blood, and over reacted.

I don't even like killing bugs (unless their trying to bite me), and I don't believe in killing just for the sport of it.

Sorry.
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Old Nov 3, 2011, 8:04 PM   #15
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I'm glad this has not spiraled out of control.

Now that I have tried to remove the horns from my head, I will say something about the sportsman in general.

Many of the wildlife areas across the U.S. are funded, in part by the license fee for hunting and fishing licenses. The goods we buy also have additional taxes and fees added to support the public areas. Federal and state duck and pheasant stamps add to this funding. In at least some measure, you have the sportsman to thank for the wildlife areas you enjoy.

In addition to the financial, there are non-profits such as Ducks Unlimited and Pheasants Forever that concentrate on habitat restoration so these and other wildlife can thrive. These programs have been hugely successful.

I'm not sure, as I'm not a member of either of the clubs whos trials I recently photographed, but I'm fairly certain the meat from the birds went to homeless shelters or feed the poor.

I, for one, spend time in Fedral and state grounds and refuges for use other than hunting and fishing. I've seen some habitat dammaged by greedy photographers removing branches, brush and ground cover to get clear shots at wildlife. They sometimes pester the wildlife until they leave their nests/dens.

Bottom line is both the sportsman, and non-sportsman need to respect the wildlife.

Happy shooting (the shutter kind).
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Old Nov 3, 2011, 8:43 PM   #16
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I'm glad this has not spiraled out of control.

Now that I have tried to remove the horns from my head, I will say something about the sportsman in general.

Many of the wildlife areas across the U.S. are funded, in part by the license fee for hunting and fishing licenses. The goods we buy also have additional taxes and fees added to support the public areas. Federal and state duck and pheasant stamps add to this funding. In at least some measure, you have the sportsman to thank for the wildlife areas you enjoy.

In addition to the financial, there are non-profits such as Ducks Unlimited and Pheasants Forever that concentrate on habitat restoration so these and other wildlife can thrive. These programs have been hugely successful.

I'm not sure, as I'm not a member of either of the clubs whos trials I recently photographed, but I'm fairly certain the meat from the birds went to homeless shelters or feed the poor.

I, for one, spend time in Fedral and state grounds and refuges for use other than hunting and fishing. I've seen some habitat dammaged by greedy photographers removing branches, brush and ground cover to get clear shots at wildlife. They sometimes pester the wildlife until they leave their nests/dens.

Bottom line is both the sportsman, and non-sportsman need to respect the wildlife.

Happy shooting (the shutter kind).
You make some good points.

When I go out to shoot nature, I don't disturb anything, don't throw butts on the ground, don't litter, and don't traumatize the animals.

I bring a coffee can of black seed, and sprinkle it around on stumps, logs, and such; in area's that would be natural looking to get a good shot. Then I'll sit close enough to get close enough with my 55-300mm lense and hope they will come and pose for me.

And I am sorry for being to harsh.

peace
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