Go Back   Steve's Digicams Forums > Digital SLR and Interchangeable Lens Cameras > Nikon dSLR

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old Mar 23, 2012, 9:23 PM   #1
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 1
Default Planning on getting d5100

Hello everyone,

I plan on purchsing my first slr camera, and would like to ask some questions before I do. I have always used a point and shoot camera and wanted too ask.

1) Would this be a good camera to learn with and start photography?

2) I like to take pictures of my friends when we go out to the city/on the train or out at the bar; in order to take a lot of shots do I have to do a lot of adjusting or would automatic settings work well or could I do a set manual setting that would be good for all of these occasions?

3) I will be doing sight seeing as well in europe in July and August so I will have to do some adjusting, where would be my best start to learn how to do adjusting? I do learn quick but I'm sure it will take me a bit

Thank You
unknown user is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Old Mar 24, 2012, 5:05 AM   #2
Senior Member
 
zig-123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Cape Cod, Massachusetts
Posts: 5,145
Default

Hi,

Most any of the entry level dslr cameras made by Nikon, Canon, Sony, or Pentax are all good cameras and will produce great results provided you take the time to learn how to use them properly. The Nikon 5100 is a great starting point.

If this is your 1st dslr camera, it would be prudent if you were to go to a camera store and personally handle the cameras before you buy. Size ergonomics, user interface, button locations are all important aspects of the camera that go a long way towards how much you will enjoy using it. If the camera is too small or big in your hands - or the controls are confusing to you you may end up being dissatisfied.

Once you decide on a camera, your next step would be to read the user's manual thoroughly as well as buying a 'how to book'. A good starting point would be Scott Kelby's Modern Digital Photography Books 1 thru 4.
They are packed with good information and will shorten the learning curve.

Zig
__________________
http://scortoncreekgallery.smugmug.com/

So you want to be a better photographer? Open your eyes and take a look at what is all around you.
zig-123 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 24, 2012, 8:03 AM   #3
Senior Member
 
TCav's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Washington, DC, Metro Area, Maryland
Posts: 13,544
Default

In addition to the excellent info that Zig has provided, I will add that the manufacturers all have free on-line tutorials for some of the more basic stuff, so you can hit the ground running, so to speak. Also, the best thing you can do is take a lot of photos, and look at them critically, thinking about what went wrong and what you could have bone better. In order to learn from your mistakes, you need to make some mistakes, so do it.

Good luck and have fun.
__________________
  • The lens is the thing.
  • 'Full Frame' is the new 'Medium Format'.
  • "One good test is worth a thousand expert opinions." - Tex Johnston, Boeing 707 test pilot.
TCav is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 26, 2012, 11:20 AM   #4
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 226
Default

I think the D5100 would be a good choice. It gives good results and has enough potential to allow you to 'grow' into it.

The sensor is the same as used in the D7000 and one of its strong points is good high ISO value, which will help your low light shooting.

There is a D5100 based book for 15 (in the UK) at the camera chain that I use - here is a link http://www.wilkinson.co.uk/books/boo...kon-d5100.html
norm smith is offline   Reply With Quote
Old Mar 26, 2012, 11:40 AM   #5
Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 8,529
Default

Let me add to the advice above. Specifically, let me address the following:
Quote:
2) I like to take pictures of my friends when we go out to the city/on the train or out at the bar; in order to take a lot of shots do I have to do a lot of adjusting or would automatic settings work well or could I do a set manual setting that would be good for all of these occasions?
First, you need to appreciate the size of any DSLR. It's not going to slip into a pocket or purse. So, taking your DSLR to the bar or out on the city can be a pain-in-the-butt. So much so, in fact, that many DSLR owners still resort to digicams when they go on social outings.

Next, the DSLR in auto mode will do just as well as any digicam out there. But there are limits to what auto mode can accomplish. There are going to be times where the camera just isn't going to get the shot because it's not smart enough. Those situations are varied - that's where YOUR brain comes in. Can't give you a magic "cheat sheet" to use as it doesn't exist.
In addition to tutorials and such, online forums like this are a great place to get specific advice. For example, when you take a photo and it didn't come out the way you wanted, posting the photo and asking "why" on forums is a great way to learn. But I warn you, you really want to do tutorials and books first - so you have a basic understanding of the principles of photography: metering, exposure, f-stop / aperture, ISO, shutter speed, focus modes, etc.
JohnG is offline   Reply With Quote
 
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 9:32 PM.