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Old Nov 8, 2012, 11:12 AM   #1
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Default The new Nikon D5200.

I see that Nikon just released the new D5200 DSLR. This is a direct replacement for the D5100. Nikon raised the megapixel count from 16.2 MP that was on the D5100 to a whopping 24 MP on the new D5200 !!!! I am not really sure that this was a good thing due to the fact that they crammed 8 million more pixels all on the same size image sensor. That is a whopping 50% increase in megapixels but no increase in image sensor size. This could actually result is poorer overall image quality than that of the D5100. What do you think ?
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Old Nov 8, 2012, 11:51 AM   #2
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All other things being equal, increased resolution only increases image quality.
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Old Nov 8, 2012, 3:50 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by surplusshooter View Post
I see that Nikon just released the new D5200 DSLR. This is a direct replacement for the D5100. Nikon raised the megapixel count from 16.2 MP that was on the D5100 to a whopping 24 MP on the new D5200 !!!! I am not really sure that this was a good thing due to the fact that they crammed 8 million more pixels all on the same size image sensor. That is a whopping 50% increase in megapixels but no increase in image sensor size. This could actually result is poorer overall image quality than that of the D5100. What do you think ?
I'm no expert but it stands to reason that there must eventually be a point when pixel count will reverse image quality. I read somewhere that with too many pixels on a sensor they overlap causing image problems, not long ago the wise men were saying that 10 mill pixels was the optimum for the consumer DSLR size sensor??.
Eventually the pixel race will stop, after all how big do you want to print(I've only got an A4 printer) and why would we need to crop so severely ,I just zoom in or move nearer and rarely crop for anything other a slight composition improvement, after all were not using film so click away.
It would be interesting to know how many amatures print poster size, professionals would use full frame anyway I would imagine.
Interestingly a friend of mine is a portrait photographer and prints beautiful portraits A4 size and uses a 2 mill pixel Nikon that he loves and has had for years.
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Old Nov 8, 2012, 4:49 PM   #4
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When you print a 4x6 photo at 1440 dpi, that's a 50MP image. In order to do that with an image from an 18MP camera, the printer driver has to make stuff up. Even at 600 dpi, the printer driver has to make stuff up in order to print an 8x10.

Maybe someday, when you're tired of having the printer driver make stuff up for you, you'll be standing in line to buy one of those 36MP cameras.
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Old Nov 9, 2012, 8:23 AM   #5
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Yeah, there probably is a point were the return in image quality from increase in pixels diminishes. Then you switch to full-frame.

But the way I look at this many pixels in an enthusiast camera is that you can get 2 shots at once!

Here's what I've come across.

I have a habit of turning my camera sideways, because I want to get a vertical format shot. I end up loving the shot. But when I try to include it into a video, because it is a vertical shot, it doesn't cover the enter tv screen (which is horizontal format). I get black dead space on either side. And I'm getting tired of seeing that.

I'm thinking that when I know there is a good chance I will want to use the shot in a video (and don't want the black dead space on either side in the video) but know that I would prefer the shot as a vertical shot when printing it out, if I've got lots of pixels to play with, I'll just shoot horizontal. That way I've got the horizontal shot for the video and I've got enough pixels to crop out that vertical shot I originally saw and wanted.

It's sorta how my sister's friend that shot weddings did with his square format Bronica. He never turned his camera on its side (because it was pointless with square format), but also, he knew that he could crop out whatever picture he wanted out of that square image because the image quality was going to be there for him.

To me, that is the real magic of 24 megapixels in an enthusiast camera.

Shoot horizontal for the video. Crop vertical for the print.

Last edited by tacticdesigns; Nov 9, 2012 at 8:26 AM.
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Old Nov 9, 2012, 8:41 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by deadshot View Post
I'm no expert but it stands to reason that there must eventually be a point when pixel count will reverse image quality.
We already know that is not the case with this sensor (it's the same sensor from the D3200). It tested very highly in the DxO mark tests and camera reviews/field tests have been very positive overall. It's a killer low-cost consumer camera.

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Old Nov 9, 2012, 11:05 AM   #7
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Apparently the new Nikon D5200 has the same Sony 24MP sensor that is in the D3200. I read the Dx OMark labs camera sensor comparison test between the Nikon 16MP D5100 and the 24MP D3200. The comparison test showed that they are both almost identical in overall image quality. The 24MP sensor tested slightly better in color depth. However, the 16MP sensor in the D5100 tested slightly better in two areas, it had slightly better dynamic range and it was also slightly better in low light ISO. This may or may not be due to the fact that the D5100 has a slightly larger physical size of sensor than that of the Sony 24MP sensor in the D3200. The D5100 has the same size sensor that is installed in the D7000. The D5100 and the D7000 have a sensor that measures 23.6X15.6 mm. The Sony 24MP sensor in the D3200 measures slightly smaller at 23.2X15.4 mm. Even though the larger sized 16MP sensor in the D5100 tested slightly better in these two areas as compaired to the D3200, I don't think that it would be possible for anyone to see any real difference in overall image quality between the two.
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Old Jan 12, 2013, 10:59 AM   #8
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Default Sensor Toshiba?

according to the link below the sensor is a toshiba

http://www.petapixel.com/2013/01/08/...ed-by-toshiba/
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Old Jan 12, 2013, 12:57 PM   #9
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Sony and Toshiba have been juggling CMOS production facilities for years. Toshiba makes the image sensor in the PS3. No doubt the 24MP chip in that particular D5200 was made by Toshiba under license to Sony.
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Old Jan 12, 2013, 7:23 PM   #10
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When you print a 4x6 photo at 1440 dpi, that's a 50MP image.
This is a misunderstanding of what "1440 dpi" in a printer means. A printer prints a dot or it doesn't (let's stick to black & white for this. Color is a slightly more complicated version of the same thing.) So, if you have an 8-bit grayscale image, it takes clumps of printer dots to create a grayscale value. The process of creating these clumps is called "half-toning." Color creates clumps called "rosettes" to reproduce color gradients. Very high-resolution (as in National Geographic) printing can go up to 300 rosettes per inch, which would require about 2MP in a 4x6 image without having to manufacture data.

Last edited by tclune; Jan 12, 2013 at 7:27 PM.
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