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Old Nov 27, 2012, 10:50 AM   #1
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Default D7000 noise testing

A lot has been written about how the Nikon D7000 camera bodies provide cleaner images at higher ISO settings than previous DX bodies. My personal feeling has been that, while the low light performance is certainly a big
improvement of what I had prior, I still see noise in my images. It isn't the nasty kind, but rather, a finer grain. BUT, it is still present.

While reading an article written by Thom Hogan on his findings when comparing noise across three different full frame models, I came upon a statement of his that said, that he always had his cameras set at base ISO and only in rare occasions did he stray above ISO 400.

Well, that made sense to me. So, I set up my camera on a tripod this morning. The lens used was the 70-200mm f2.8. I was bound and determined to see if I could get reasonably good images of birds in lousy light.

The following 2 images are good examples of what I got this morning. The photos were pp in CS6. I did not adjust noise in any way. I did adjust the sharpness and clarity sliders up a tweak.






The following images is offered for comparison. Taken at ISO800.
You can see, that while the noise is not generally offensive, it is nonetheless present:



So what did I learn this morning? Since these are some of the cleanest bird images I've ever seen come out of the D7000, I think I'm not going to go above ISO400, use the tripod, and slow the shutter down to the slowest possible speed to get the shot.

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Old Nov 27, 2012, 10:58 AM   #2
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I'll go along with that.
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Old Nov 29, 2012, 12:51 AM   #3
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That's a beautiful shot of the titmouse.
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Old Dec 12, 2012, 5:51 PM   #4
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being new and trying to learn, point out what is noise in the photo.
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Old Dec 12, 2012, 7:43 PM   #5
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Actually, those photos are poor examples of noise, which is the point.
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Old Jan 9, 2013, 7:54 AM   #6
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What ISO were the first 2 shots? Where they RAW? or JPG with Noise Reduction on or off?

I just picked up a new D3200, and I'm at a similar point trying to get a handle on what to expect under different circumstances. I've found, for instance, that if I shoot JPG's at iso3200 there isn't much noise, but the images are a little soft, so the NR is probably a bit overzealous.
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Old Jan 9, 2013, 8:26 AM   #7
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One of the consequences of noise reduction is a loss of detail, because the noise reduction algorithms can't distinguish between noise and detail.

But keep in mind that resolution has a way of reducing the impact of noise all by itself. You may experience noise in those 24MP images while pixel peeping, but taken as a whole, the image will appear quite good.
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Old Jan 9, 2013, 10:29 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmokinJoe View Post
What ISO were the first 2 shots? Where they RAW? or JPG with Noise Reduction on or off?

I just picked up a new D3200, and I'm at a similar point trying to get a handle on what to expect under different circumstances. I've found, for instance, that if I shoot JPG's at iso3200 there isn't much noise, but the images are a little soft, so the NR is probably a bit overzealous.
1st shot: ISO 320, f2.8, exposure 1/200
2nd shot: ISO400, f5, exposure 1/80

I shoot RAW only manual mode, for this set of images, I set the AUTO ISO setting to a minimum of 100, with a max of 400, Then set the minimum shot to 1/80.


You can customize the sharpness settings in your camera to better suit your needs- if you wish.

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Old Jan 9, 2013, 12:18 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zig-123 View Post
You can customize the sharpness settings in your camera to better suit your needs- if you wish.
The "Sharpness" setting in your camera doesn't actually affect the sharpness, which is determined by the resolution of the image sensor and the resolving power of the lens. What the "Sharpness" setting does is play with the image to increase the edge contrast on areas that already have high contrast. This is known as Acutance. In images without high contrast areas, the "Sharpness" setting doesn't actually do anything.

Quote:
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I shoot RAW only ...
... and if you shoot RAW, you can set the "Sharpness", as well as a number of other settings, to anything you want and they won't do anything, because RAW files are not affected by in-camera post processing.
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Old Jan 9, 2013, 2:10 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCav View Post
The "Sharpness" setting in your camera doesn't actually affect the sharpness, which is determined by the resolution of the image sensor and the resolving power of the lens. What the "Sharpness" setting does is play with the image to increase the edge contrast on areas that already have high contrast. This is known as Acutance. In images without high contrast areas, the "Sharpness" setting doesn't actually do anything.



... and if you shoot RAW, you can set the "Sharpness", as well as a number of other settings, to anything you want and they won't do anything, because RAW files are not affected by in-camera post processing.

That's why I'm glad I know Steve's You learn something here everyday...

The RAW part I knew- Just had one of my many senior moments.....
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