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Old Feb 10, 2013, 8:29 AM   #1
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Hello,

I got Nikon D7000 couple of months ago. Can any body tell me what settings we should follow to get beach water picture as blur with facing towards sun in Nikon D7000 ?
Yesterday i visited beach & i tried to take photos in manual mode but pix were coming complete white with full of brightness.
I setup my cam on ISO value 100 (lowest), shutter speed 10" & exposure 22 (max) but i was not able to see the water. Then I tried with P Mode i was able to get the beach in pictures but water was not blurry.

Can any body advise tip please ?
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Old Feb 10, 2013, 9:16 AM   #2
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You want a long exposure time with the Sun in the frame.

In P (Program Auto) Mode, you can use the Main Command Dial to adjust the exposure settings. The camera will select the aperture and shutter speed, but you can rotate teh main command dial to adjust the selected settings. If you rotate it one way, the apertue will increase and the shutter speed will decrease, and if you rotate it the other way, the aperture will decrease and the shutter speed will decrease. The settings can not be adjusted past what teh lens and/or camera are capable of, so if you can't get long enough shutter speeds for the amount of blur you want, you'll probably need to use a neutral density filter or two.

Alternatively, you can just recompose so the Sun isn't in the frame.



There are two things you should remember:
  • With the Sun in the frame, the extreme brightness will dilute whatever dynamic range is left for the rest of the image.
  • Exposing the image sensor to direct sunlight (or any very bright light) for a significant length of time, can damage the camera, not to mention your eye when looking through the viewfinder.
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Old Feb 10, 2013, 2:11 PM   #3
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G'day 493
You say ...

Quote:
Originally Posted by anis493 View Post
... Can anybody tell me what settings we should follow to get beach water picture as blur with facing towards sun ... Yesterday i visited beach & i tried to take photos in manual mode but pix were coming complete white with full of brightness. I setup my cam on ISO value 100 (lowest), shutter speed 10" & exposure 22 (max) but i was not able to see the water. ...
You don't tell us what time of day it was, except that you are shooting for 10 seconds at f22
10 seconds exposure while the sun is still visible "does not compute" as the old saying goes ~ unless you get some additional assistance

As TC says - a very dark Neutral Density filter will help to erase 90% of the sunlight leaving just a small amount of light coming thru the lens and then allowing you to get the images you want

These ND filters are sold as "ND400" or "ND1000" filters and will cost you about $100

If these are not an option, then your only other option - at $0, is to visit the ocean after dark or well before sunrise when the camera 'needs' 10 sec to 30 seconds to complete the exposure - and along with a good tripod you can get your long exposure images showing the moving water as a nice blur. Remember tho that seawater & cameras do not mix very well, and any sea water inside the camera will permanently ruin it

Regards, Phil
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Old Feb 11, 2013, 10:41 AM   #4
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I would recommend that you either use manual exposure or aperture preferred exposure mode, and overexpose by one F-stop. The sun in the picture will confuse the exposure meter, and it will assume that the entire photo is brighter. This picture is NOT being shared because I think it is a good photo. It isn't, I know. But I had to increase exposure one full F-stop in Lightroom to get it to look even close to the correct exposure.

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