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Old Aug 3, 2013, 10:36 PM   #1
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Default high speed flash on D600

My D600 is in for under warranty servicing at present, but one of the last shots I took before it went in was at a vegetable stand. Just for the heck of it, I decided to test out the high speed flash sync limits.

D600, Sigma 17-50 2.8 lens, SB800 flash

1/4000 sec, f4, ISO 280




So am curious if others have used high speed flash settings, maybe tested it out under more challenging conditions. I know my flash will lose reach by using high speed shutter, but may be able to say, use 1/1,000th second flash on indoor basketball this fall, so planning to see how it works out.
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Old Aug 6, 2013, 10:41 AM   #2
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I wonder just how much reach you will really lose. The flash duration is really short anyway. I suggest you do a few high-speed flash tests yourself. I'm also curious, although I only have a D90, and it really wouldn't matter anyway.
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Old Aug 7, 2013, 12:32 AM   #3
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I plan on testing it this winter with some indoor sports photos at 1/500 sec. or faster, and see if other scenarios would warrant using it.

It's a feature that I've not heard much about as far as other photographers who use it. Guess I'll do a google search and see what comes up.

EDIT:

the flash 'pulses' in high speed sync.

for reference -

http://darrellyoung.blogspot.com/201...lash-sync.html
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Old Sep 30, 2013, 1:37 AM   #4
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paradecheershot

About 20% of image cropped off, at 165mm, f5.6 at ISO500; Nikkor 55-300 f4/5.6 and D600 with SB700 flash at 1/500th sec.
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Old Sep 30, 2013, 8:25 AM   #5
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When using flash, what determines the exposure is not the shutter speed but the duration of the flash. If you'll be shooting basketball, stick with the conventional flash sync speed and use a powerful flash so the flash will be short.

dSLRs and mirrorless cameras use focal plane shutters to expose the image sensor. Depending on the power of the flash and the ambient light, a flash could last as long as 1/300 second or as short as 1/80,000 second. The conventional flash sync speed is to give the shutter enough time to expose the entire sensor for the duration of the flash.



If you used a shutter speed any faster, there would be a good chance that the top curtain would be on its way down before the top portion of the sensor was properly exposed.

High Speed Shutter gets around this by, instead of making one powerful flash, making multiple, much less powerful flashes, each timed such that each portion of the sensor will be properly exposed, since often, the top curtain has started coming down before the bottom curtain has uncovered the bottom of the sensor.

You can use HSS for sports/action shooting, but a subject moving quickly across the frame would appear at one side at the top of the image, but at the other side at the bottom of the image. Also, if you're panning to follow the action, the same will happen to the stationary objects in the frame.
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Old Sep 30, 2013, 2:23 PM   #6
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TCav - thanks for the graph; will play with it to check the effects once basketball season begins.
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Old Sep 30, 2013, 4:31 PM   #7
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Remember that, instead of one long flash, during HHS the flash gives 5 much less powerful flashes in order to cover the entire sensor. If the subject is distant, it's not going to work unless your flash is really powerful.
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Old Sep 30, 2013, 8:32 PM   #8
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I understood what you said, I'm going to personally try it and see the effects.

I have an SB800 but the lcd just went bad so picked up an SB700.

It seems mainly useful for opening up apertures to get shallow depth of field in bright sunlight. But I'm trying to find the balance/distance to not make the flash too noticeable (parade photo) but putting just a hint of light in the eyes/skin. I saw a video on line that was using it with pocket wizards for portraits, I'm exploring what I can do with it 'on the fly.'
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Last edited by Franko170; Sep 30, 2013 at 8:35 PM.
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