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Old Jan 21, 2014, 6:34 AM   #1
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Default Panorama device??

I have a Nikon 7100 dslr and would like to take Panoramic photos. A while ago the salesman told me about "Panorama head" for the camera. At that time I did not record the name of the device. I think it goes on the tripod and use the camera to shoot Panoramic photos. Could someone here please let me know what this devices is really called?

Thank you in advance.
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Old Jan 21, 2014, 9:26 AM   #2
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They go by a variety of names, but all perform similar functions.

http://www.adorama.com/searchsite/de...hinfo=panorama

In general, they mount between the camera body and the Tripod head, and allow you to rotate the camera by a consistent amount so you can assemble the collection of photos into a single panoramic view.
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Old Jan 22, 2014, 11:38 AM   #3
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OR! You can try the simple and FREE Microsoft ICE. (Image Composite Editor) As long as your series of shots have overlap, same size and same level they come out virtually seamless. Vertical and horizontal.

There are about 6 shots here I took for a home sale. I did see a demo shot for ICE with about 200 photos of a bridge, it was impressive.

http://microsoft-image-composite-edi....softonic.com/

BUT! If I'm talking something different than what you want....Then just ignore me.
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Old Jan 22, 2014, 12:36 PM   #4
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The software that Scouse mentioned is one of many that allows you to use your shots to construct a panoramic image. The devices I mentioned help you take shots that those programs can use.
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Old Jan 22, 2014, 8:51 PM   #5
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I take panos frequently but have never broken down and gotten a pano head.

1. Before taking the photos, use the level bubble on your tripod (or purchase on if you tripod/head doesn't have one - they're cheap)

2. Take a series of shots with about a 20% overlap along the level horizontal plane. I use one of the focus markers in the viewfinder as my 20% marker...then rotate to where it is on the previous photo's edge.

3. Exposure - while some pano softwares have fusion to blend exposure differences, try to have exposure consistency in the rotation...switching to manual if necessary. I shoot in RAW so tweeking the exposure in post is simple. Typically in Lightroom will reserve 4 star for intended Pano shots, filter to just 4 star in the Develop module and can see which ones, if any need a little exposure tweeking - and that is the only adjustment you should make prior to stitching. Export to jpg for stitching. Reserve additional processing (contrast, leveling, verticals, removing objects, etc) to the final stitched product.
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Old Jan 22, 2014, 11:34 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tizeye View Post
I take panos frequently but have never broken down and gotten a pano head.

1. Before taking the photos, use the level bubble on your tripod (or purchase on if you tripod/head doesn't have one - they're cheap)

2. Take a series of shots with about a 20% overlap along the level horizontal plane. I use one of the focus markers in the viewfinder as my 20% marker...then rotate to where it is on the previous photo's edge.

3. Exposure - while some pano softwares have fusion to blend exposure differences, try to have exposure consistency in the rotation...switching to manual if necessary. I shoot in RAW so tweeking the exposure in post is simple. Typically in Lightroom will reserve 4 star for intended Pano shots, filter to just 4 star in the Develop module and can see which ones, if any need a little exposure tweeking - and that is the only adjustment you should make prior to stitching. Export to jpg for stitching. Reserve additional processing (contrast, leveling, verticals, removing objects, etc) to the final stitched product.
So you've done it a couple of times.

My biggest mistake was to shoot with the White Balance at Auto. Each shot had it's own white alliance sweet spot.
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