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Old Feb 19, 2014, 10:40 AM   #1
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Just to get going with a sorta all purpose lens, rather than 2 kit type lenses I was looking at this:
Nikon Nikkor AF-S Zoom lens - 18 mm - 300 mm - F/3.5-5.6 - Nikon
F
Does anyone have any experiences they'd like to share, good or bad?
They boast or should I say their copy writers say...:
"If you want a single lens that can cover every imaginable shooting situation, from wide-angle groups to ultra-high-power zoom shots, look no further than the AF-S DX NIKKOR 18 mm - 300 mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED VR. Boasting the longest reach of any NIKKOR all-in-one zoom lens, it delivers the equivalent of 450 mm - enough reach to bring the most distant action up close. Nikon's second generation VR II technology ensures every photo and HD video is razor-sharp, and Nikon's advancements in lens design deliver consistent, exceptional performance in any setting. It's also great for close-up shooting. Even more amazing, the AF-S NIKKOR 18 mm - 300 mm f/3.5-5.6 G ED VR does all this in a surprisingly compact, lightweight lens."
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Old Feb 19, 2014, 10:58 AM   #2
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That is a jack-of-all-trades-and-master-of-none lens. It's got a lot of chromatic aberration and distortion, and it isn't very sharp anywhere in it's zoom range. (See SLRGear.com Test Results.) The Tamron 18-270 is about as good at half the price, though Nikon's optical image stabilization is a lot better than Tamron's.

But neither will outperform multiple lenses of less ambitious zoom ranges for the same price.

Superzoom lenses are convenient, but that's all they are.
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Old Feb 19, 2014, 5:08 PM   #3
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The only "all in one" lens I've had experience with was Tamron's older 18-270 VR (non PZD) and the only real weakness I found was shots at wide angle- namely distortion.
I didn't have a CA issue on my example worth talking about and the stabilizer was very good- and the focus was pretty brisk too..!
By all accounts the Nikon lens has distortion issues also- but most of the modern Nikon DX bodies can correct this "in camera"- again though,the weak area seems to be at wide angle...
Here's what Mr Rockwell thinks...
http://www.kenrockwell.com/nikon/18-300mm.htm#perf

These kind of lenses are indeed very convenient- though in the case of the Nikon variant, the price less so...!
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Old Feb 20, 2014, 6:42 PM   #4
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Thanks guys. I'm reading the same things . Gotta take the plunge next week with the D600 and I am looking for an all purpose lens. And still looking.
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Old Feb 20, 2014, 7:37 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scouse View Post
Gotta take the plunge next week with the D600 and I am looking for an all purpose lens.
Bad idea. The D600 is an 'FX' ('Full Frame') camera, meaning it has an image sensor that's the same size as a 35mm film negative. The 18-300 is a 'DX' ('APS-C only') lens that projects a smaller image. Mounting that lens (or any 'APS-C only' lens) on that body means you'll only get a 3936x2624 (10MP) image from that 6016x4016 (24MP) sensor.

The only lenses that have a similar zoom range and project a 'Full Frame' image are the Nikon AF-S NIKKOR 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6G ED VR and the Tamron 28-300MM F/3.5-6.3 Di VC, neither of which are sharp enough to do justice to the D600's 24MP sensor.

If you really need a superzoom lens, I suggest you stick with an 'APS-C' body like Nikon's D3300, D5300 or D7100.
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Old Feb 23, 2014, 6:40 PM   #6
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Hi Ken,

I agree with TCav, if you are looking for a set up to photograph birds with a nice zoom the D7100 make more sense, but I think you are confused with the 28-300mm f3.5-5,6 this lens is a FX model.

I have both cameras Ken, the D600 and D7100 and for birding and wildlife I use the D7100 with a Nikon 300mm f4 and a Sigma 120-300mm with 1.4, 1.7 and 2.0 TC's.

But I assuming your are looking for a camera for your real state pictures so I think if this is the case the D600 is a great option but the most expensive also.

If you need a versatile set up for all your needs provably the D7100 is a great solution for you with the Tokina 11-16mm for your Real State shots and the 18-300mm you cover all the focal distances.

Good luck Ken and let me know if you have questions.

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Old Feb 23, 2014, 7:44 PM   #7
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Re: D600 v. D7100

There are very few situations where 'Full Frame' has any real advantage over 'APS-C'. The primary advantages are a more shallow depth of field and better sensor performance (dynamic range and image noise), though the difference is slight, and neither of which would apply to either birding or real estate. Therefore, you'd be better off with an 'APS-C' body either way. Perhaps there are other considerations, but this response is based on what MarceloLI posted.
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Old Mar 20, 2014, 9:26 PM   #8
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"They boast or should I say their copy writers say...:
"If you want a single lens that can cover every imaginable shooting situation"

Real Estate being the 'every imaginable shooting situation' that doesn't apply. 18 (or 28FF) just is not wide enough. I just upgraded last week to the D610 and rather than suffer the loss with the DX lens, I purchased the 16-35. I upgraded from D7000 with the Sigma 10-20, which I have retained as backup and special situations. The sale that Nikon has going on right now not requiring a camera purchase with the 16-35 is really what pushed me as I intended to go FF this year anyway. With it, I also purchased the 24-85 as a walkaround and already had the 70-300 (as well as the 50 and 85 primes)

Strongly consider the multi-lens setup over the all in one, and in the case of ultrawide angle, it will be a multi lens setup. If staying with DX, that Sigma 10-20 is a very good lens, however, expect to practice with any UWA lens to get it right inside the camera. In that respect, it is one of the hardest lens to use.
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