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Old Mar 17, 2004, 1:11 PM   #1
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Default D100 Underexposures?

I've now had my D100 for about 2 months and I love it. The shots I'm getting at my sons lacrosse games (middle school and varsity) are great.

I've noticed, however, that the shots are all underexposed, and to correct that I need to increase exposure 2 stops, or +1. Everything then looks great except for the whites which get blown out. Next game I'll try increasing 1 stop, or +.5.

Anyone have any thoughts?

Thanks,

Jeff
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Old Mar 17, 2004, 1:42 PM   #2
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Underexposure is a very well known issue with the D100 and IMO it's strengh.

By underexposing the shots like D100 does, you will have less blown highlights. When I shoot in sunshine, I use the Sunshine whitebalance setting, but also add -1 EV. This way I will get lots and lots of details as it is much easier to get details from darker areas than blown out hightlight.

This is something that Nikon did by purpose.
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Old Mar 17, 2004, 3:57 PM   #3
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Thanks Klaus,

I guess that means that all photos need some kind of post-processing. What do you suggest, a simple brightness/contrast, levels or curves. I read inone of the forums that someone likes the following: first, auto contract, next a midtone adjustment in levels, and lastly a punch up of color in hue/saturation. I'm fairly new to photoshop (6.0) and could use some input.

Jeff
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Old Mar 17, 2004, 5:41 PM   #4
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I agree with klaus, When you learn how, and when... After you have mastered it. I noticed I was getting it right when I processed with nikon View and when you hit auto contrast, Not much changes...
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Old Mar 17, 2004, 11:25 PM   #5
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I would recommend Nikon Capture 4.1 - a great program. You can edit in 16 bit mode and in very small and precise steps. However if you haven't got this program (you can get a trial version at www.nikon.com) it could be a good idea to at least use the curves function. Be careful to use any autosettings. This will only provide you with settings, that someone else has made for you. Not you own taste! Well, that's just my idea. Nikon View is also a very good option for editing (trial also available at nikon.com), like Dale stated.
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Old Mar 18, 2004, 10:13 AM   #6
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Default Photoshop adjustments

I also am new to the D100, and here is what I do. I use Photoshop CS.
1) Levels (not auto) Bring the right slider down a bit.
2) Highligh/midtone adjustment - The default is usually fine (best feature of the new CS)
3) Any color correction needed (Photo Filters) If the WB is set properly, this usually does not need to be done.
4) Unsharp mask - I use this at a low setting (30%) and apply several times.
Thes order of levels-Shadow adjustments I am not sure is "right" Seems better sometimes to reverse the order...

Depending on the type of shots... I do events and have actions for the different scenerios. Then batch process them. 98% are just fine done like that. PS 8 (CS) is a great thing

Won't get into the RAW vs JPG thing, but I always shoot jpg.
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Old Mar 18, 2004, 12:09 PM   #7
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I usually don't use the brightness/contrast in PS. Levels does the same thing but more accurate. Adjust the right and left sliders to make your whites white and blacks black, but be careful not to clip too much. I'm not sure about PS 6, but in PS 7 & CS, you can hold down Alt (Or option for you mac people) while moving the slider and it'll show you what, if anything, is being clipped. Then, adjust the midtone slider until the overall brightness is to your liking.
You can do a color adjustment in cureves or levels that also takes care of most of the brightness broblems. Click on the white eyedropper in the dialog box, then click on something in the picture that should be pure white (255,255,255) and presto - instant white balance. You can do pretty close to the same thing with the gray and black eyedroppers. Not a perfect solution for everything, but it's darn close. Then saturation adjustment then sharpening.
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Old Mar 22, 2004, 8:34 PM   #8
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Just set it to +.7 and forget the other stuff.
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Old Mar 23, 2004, 12:08 PM   #9
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Red.

You seems to have missed the point. If you shoot at +.7 you will get those burned out hightlights, that Nikon try to save us from. I often shoot -1 with sunny whitebalance setting. This way I can use Capture (which edits in smaller and more precise steps than PS) to get the best out of the scene.

I've also used PS CS for some time. It is indeed a fine program, but the RAW conversion for Nikon is not good enough IMO. There really is a difference in the final results. I would recommend Capture anytime for RAW files. PS is good, but you can be a world champ in all diciplines, right!
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