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Old May 12, 2004, 7:21 AM   #11
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Only reason I want to get a second battery is because I have noticed that my camera tends to give me what I consider a relatively short notice when the battery is weak. I wasout shooting once and had to stop because my battery went dead .... I knew it was low, but I was surprised it was that low ... so anyway, with a second battery which I'll not need much I'll have the peace of mind that I'll have battery power when I need it.
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Old May 12, 2004, 9:46 AM   #12
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I've experienced the same thing. The battery indicator shows fairly high, then all of a sudden it's dead. Apparently these batteries hold their voltage up pretty well until nearly exhausted. The downside of that is that sunset happens fast.

Deane
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Old May 12, 2004, 3:01 PM   #13
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Yeap, it last forever than goes out as fast as the sun. That's when the second battery is useful or for those cold winter day.
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Old May 12, 2004, 5:35 PM   #14
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This is the response I got from a Nikon Tech;

Li-ion batteries do not work like regular batteries, meaning it provides 100% from begining to end, therefore they're either charged or dead, unlike regular batteries in any device, performance degrades as charge drops, not the case with Li-ion batteries!
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Old May 13, 2004, 11:16 AM   #15
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private wrote:
Quote:
This is the response I got from a Nikon Tech;

Li-ion batteries do not work like regular batteries, meaning it provides 100% from begining to end, therefore they're either charged or dead, unlike regular batteries in any device, performance degrades as charge drops, not the case with Li-ion batteries!

Does this provide anyinsight to the question of whether charging a D70 battery when it is not fully discharged is harmful? Or is that just to do with the quick fall from full to no-charge ?

It would be good to know really, I'mkinda scared of charging it now unless its fully discharged!
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Old May 13, 2004, 1:38 PM   #16
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from what I've understood, the battery will last longer if you charge it only when it is completely dead. the same goes for any Li-Ion battery.I just found the manual for my cell phone this morning, my phone came with a Li-Ion battery, and the manual clearly states; Battery Charge: Re-Charge battery with included charger and power adapter. Use only original (manufacturer's name) batteries. All Li-Ion batteries should be charged prior to use and re-charged only when power meter displays 0% battery life remaining... I guess all Li-Ions are the same then! :idea:
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Old May 13, 2004, 3:25 PM   #17
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jimbojetset wrote:
[quote]private wrote:
Quote:
This is the response I got from a Nikon Tech;

Li-ion batteries do not work like regular batteries, meaning it provides 100% from begining to end, therefore they're either charged or dead, unlike regular batteries in any device, performance degrades as charge drops, not the case with Li-ion batteries!

Basically this means that they beat you out of a good meter. The D1x has a lousy meter and it uses NIMH's. I have no idea why they do this - Every other componenet seems quite good. Before you disagree - Why bother having a meter at all? Might as well have an idiot light.

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Old May 13, 2004, 9:35 PM   #18
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All rechargeables, regardless of nicad, NiMH, Lion, etc. have a very flat discharge curve when compared to alkalines. The nature of them is to provide a constant voltage for as long as possible and then just give up.

It's this "just give up" at the end that you are seeing in the battery meter; all of a sudden it reads from full to empty. All battery meters on these devices measure voltages and because the discharge curve is so flat, it's hard to give any gradual warning.

Yes, an idiot light is what the meter is doing. There's nothing they can do about it. It's nature of the technology.

As for charging Lion before they are 100% discharged, it doesn't matter if they are 10% discharged or 100% discharged. Lion has no memory effects and the charger will know when to cut the charge cycle.

Yes, discharging 100% and then recharging will give you a longer life but it's neglegible. I rather have convenience and loose a few charge cycles in the life of the pack. This way I don't have to keep tabs on how much is left in the pack.
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Old May 14, 2004, 1:21 AM   #19
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MK wrote:
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Lion has no memory effects and the charger will know when to cut the charge cycle.
From my experience (see my prev post above), I've found the MH-18 charger not to conform to that assumption of knowing when to terminate.

Nikonians.org have a very comprehensive battery guide, which some may be interested in reading though. It covers all battery chemistries and offers tips on how to care for the cells, not from the traditional electonics point of view but from a photographer's point.

http://www.nikonians.org/html/resour...ery-guide.html
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Old May 14, 2004, 7:32 AM   #20
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Lion batteries can not be charged with a timed charger. You will get a nasty explosion. No manufacturer in their right mind would supply a timed charger for Lion. Talk about a law suit waiting to happen. As a matter of fact, they are the most senstive to charge out of the three technologies.

The charging process of Lion is very sensitive to voltave and current. Both must be monitored very carefully. During the charge cycle, the current is varied. It gets ramped up quickly in the beginning and at a certain voltage it is tapered off. No timed charger has the smarts to do this kind of control.

For nicad and NiMH, they are charged using a constant current. The voltage is unimportant as long as it's above the pack voltage.
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