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Old May 3, 2004, 9:49 AM   #1
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Hi guys, another D70 question... when and why would you play with the aperture ring on the D70's lens? (the one that comes with the kit...) I read somewhere that you must set it to highest F#, smallest aperture before installing it, true? What is the difference between a type G lens and any other? Thanks!
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Old May 3, 2004, 10:20 PM   #2
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You have to set it at the highest number with any non-G Type lens. I have no idea why, I was actually thinking about this exact same question 30seconds before I saw your post, so I'm interested in why as well...
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Old May 3, 2004, 11:20 PM   #3
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It has something to do with the automation in thelens/body combination. I don't know the specifics, but in a lot of the newer (last couple years) Nikon SLR bodies, any lens with an apeture ring needs to be set at the 'auto' number to work properly.
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Old May 4, 2004, 1:19 AM   #4
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I read this as well - regarding the need to stop down any non G lenses. I believe Gandalf is correct, the way the lens mounts onto the body, there are guides that enable depth of field preview and indeed the aperture diaphrams themselves to work correctly when taking a picture (just as there's the mini torque screw that controlls Auto Focusing).

With G lenses, aperture is controlled by the body. With non G lenses, it's presumably controlled by the CPU on the lens, which needs to communicate this to the CPU on the body, which in turn relays to the image processing chip, etc.
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Old May 4, 2004, 7:56 AM   #5
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With "none G" lenses the aperture is still controlled from the camera body. There's a little lever inside that moves the aperture back to maximum and then controls it for subsequent preview/shooting. I believe that the dialogue with the lens chip provides information on the available f stops for the lens, as well as focusing distance information (where supported).

The big issue with G type lenses tends to be backward compatibility, by which I mean building on previous functionality. You can use a G type lens on an F5 but I don't think that it would work on an F4. OK, maybe not an issue for most of us, but in 5 years time we may have equivalent problems with our D70's and D100's when/if Nikon come up with the next design break.

Regards, Graham.


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Old May 4, 2004, 10:06 AM   #6
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OK, so the kit lens that comes with the D70 is a type G right? If anyone in here has the D70, can you confirm? Therefore I shouldn't have to adjust anything on the lens before insatlling it, am I correct?

Thanks for all the help everyone!
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Old May 4, 2004, 5:49 PM   #7
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G lens does not have the aperture ring, so you don't need to do anything. AF-D lens has the aperture ring, with Nikon cameras, the ring need to set and lock in at the smallest aperture value (larger number such as 16, 22 or 32) so all of the auto shooting modes will work probably (most lenses also have the lock swicth so that you don't accidentlly turn the ring),except in A mode, on some cameras, you have to turn the ring to set the aperture, and the camera will set the shutter speed. Newer camera you just turn the thumb wheel to change both F/stop and shutter speed.

The lens comes with the kit is the new G lens type, most pro-phtographer, they prefer the D lens type, as they can change the aperture setting using A mode on the F5 and the F100 film cameras.

Cheers




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Old May 4, 2004, 7:42 PM   #8
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[email protected] wrote:
Quote:
G lens does not have the aperture ring, so you don't need to do anything. AF-D lens has the aperture ring, with Nikon cameras, the ring need to set and lock in at the smallest aperture value (larger number such as 16, 22 or 32) so all of the auto shooting modes will work probably (most lenses also have the lock swicth so that you don't accidentlly turn the ring),except in A mode, on some cameras, you have to turn the ring to set the aperture, and the camera will set the shutter speed. Newer camera you just turn the thumb wheel to change both F/stop and shutter speed.

The lens comes with the kit is the new G lens type, most pro-phtographer, they prefer the D lens type, as they can change the aperture setting using A mode on the F5 and the F100 film cameras.

Cheers



So what is the last ring (with numbers/values) on my lens, closest to camera?


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Old May 5, 2004, 1:32 AM   #9
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private wrote:
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So what is the last ring (with numbers/values) on my lens, closest to camera?


If the numbers are a sequence similar to:

22 16 11 8 5.6 4 2.8

That is the aperture ring. If it's a sequence similar to:

70 50 35 24 18

That is the zoom ring.

If you're referring to the numbers as can be seen throughthe little window - measurements in 'ft' and 'm', that's the focal length indicator. It tells you approximately how far away the lens is focusing on.When you're using auto focus, it matters not what setting it's at. This is one useful featurethat Nikon has included in their kit lens that Canon's 300D did not - a clutch that the user can manually override the focus setting even when you've got auto focus engaged.


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Old May 5, 2004, 8:31 AM   #10
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Sounds like you refer the the aperture ring....The Nikon AF-S DX Zoom 18-70mm F/3.5-4.5G IF ED is a G lens that came with the D70 kit doesn't have a apeture ring, in fact all of the new G lenses were designed that way. You need to check and verify your lens, if it does have the aperture ring, it's not the above mentioned lens, period....
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